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Being always anxious to support the honor and fair fame of the Republican cause, to the utmost efforts of my feeble abilities, may I beg permission to lay before the President and Father of our Nation, some facts relative to the Office of Collector of the Revenue for the Port of Salem and to make a few observations on the appointmt of another Officer should a vacancy happen,—at a time almost...
22 July 1802, Salem. Acknowledges JM’s letter of 12 July [not found] enclosing a commission for him as a commissioner of bankruptcy for the district of Massachusetts. Regrets he cannot accept the office owing to pressing commercial business that would make it “ extremely inconvenient .” RC ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , 1801–9, filed under “Crowninshield”). 1 p.; docketed by Jefferson.
Remarks on the American flag & seamen. The writer of the anonymous communication enclosed to the President, has stated “that America lost immense sums in the course of the late war by spoliations,” and there can be no question about it, but he certainly attributes these losses to a wrong cause. I would ask if the 400 American vessels captured by Great Brittain previous to the ratification of...
I have the honor to inclose you some ill-digested remarks on the anonymous communication which you sent me yesterday.— I acknowledge the practice alluded to is supposed to exist among our merchants, but I assure you it is more a subject of clamour with some interested people than any thing else. If it were really carried on to the extent, and in the manner described by the writer, and had...
Should you think it necessary to remove Mr. Hodge the surveyor for Newbury port Massachusetts, we beg leave to recommend Francis Carr Esqe as his successor.— We have reason to believe, from the best information we have been able to collect, that Mr. Hodge does not conduct himself in the most prudent manner. We have understood from good authority that he is a high party man, generally very...
2 boxes. containing the dried parts of Halibut 2 Kegs. of Cod sounds & tongues, each separate, and in pickle, only one has a few fins of the Halibut packed in it, no more of the last could be procured as the fishermen are not in the habit of curing it. It will be necessary to let the sounds & tongues remain in water at least a day before eating to take off the salt, but those not intended for...
Agreeably to my promise just before I left Washington, I lately sent you the articles mentioned in the enclosed memorandum, which I procured about six weeks past immediately on the return of our fishing vessels from the Banks. It was some time before any good opportunity offered to forward them, and the vessel by which I was finally obliged to send them will proceed no further than Baltimore,...
Mr. Crowninshield presents his compliments to Mr. Jefferson and begs leave to inform him that the cost of the Fish was so trifling it hardly need be estimated as any thing, and Mr. C has made no memodm. of it. at the farthest it could not have exceeded 4 Dollars. Mr. Crowninshield felt much gratified in having it in his power to procure it, but regrets that it was not of so good a quality as...
14 January 1805, Washington. “I have been requested to transmit the enclosed Protest [not found] to your Department. I am well acquainted with Willm Pittman who has signed that instrument. He is a native of Salem in Massachusetts where his family & friends reside, and many of them are personally known to me. Mr. Pittman’s case appears to have been an extremely hard one and it would give me...
I received late in the evening of yesterday the letter which I beg leave to enclose for your perusal & I have only delayed till this morning to come to a determination on the subject to which it refers; as it would have been improper in me to postpone my final answer a single day after I had obtained what your goodness permitted me to wait for. You will in a moment perceive the delicate...
This mornings mail brought me the two letters which I beg leave to enclose for your perusal. I have sent both letters, that you may be the better judge of the feelings & wishes of the writer. Their contents must have great weight with me in making up my decision on the subject, which your extreme goodness has so long permitted me to have under my consideration, and after mature reflection I...
Jacob Crowninshield presents his respects to Mr. Jefferson and will wait upon him at any hour when he could know Mr. Jefferson might be at leisure, he will certainly call at 10 O’Clock monday forenoon, or to morrow at the same hour if it is wished and Mr. Jefferson will be so good as to inform him that this will be more convenient or agreeable. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Having received from you far greater attentions than I was any way intitled to, and having a sincere disposition to give my best services in support of your Administration I had determined previous to leaving Washington to accept the appointment with which I had been honored, almost at every sacrifice, and I then flattered myself I should be able to surmount all the obstacles which seemed...
Jacob Crowninshield presents his respects to Mr. Jefferson & has the honor of informing him that he has received his note of the 11th inst and will with great pleasure procure the quintal of dumb-fish and send it by the first vessel as directed or to the nearest port in Virginia. J.C regrets that he has been obliged to come to the resolution expressed in his letter of this days date, but he...
§ From Jacob Crowninshield. 9 July 1805, Salem. “You will oblige me very much by informing me whether the Island of Curacoa in the West Indies is in a state of actual blockade, or considered so by the Government. Several recent captures of vessels belonging to this quarter of the Union, under the charge of being bound to Curacoa, has caused much sensation among our Merchts and I have been...
Our worthy friend the Revd Wm. Bentley of this town has requested me to transmit the enclosed letter to you, and I assure you I comply with the greatest pleasure, it has some relation to the brave Genl. Starks, who gained the battle of Bennington, this hero of the North, who has now passed his 75th year, possesses all the fire of youth, he is the firm republican and the warm friend of your...
It is with the greatest pleasure I announce to you an honorable peace with Tripoli. The Brigt Belle-Isle Capt Leach is this moment arrived in this port from the Meditn. & brings the important accot that Genl Eaton fought the Tripolitan army about 100 leagues from Tripoli on the 10th June & gained a great victory the conquered agreed to immediate peace. The prisoners are all released. a Treaty...
I hasten to correct a mistake into which I had fallen in my letter of this morning respecting some particulars of the peace with Tripoli. I had not then seen the Capt’ of the vessel from the Mediterranean. the person who came direct from the vessel, as she was entering the harbour, was misinformed in some of the details & of course led me into error. Capt Leach now informs me in substance,...
I beg leave to present you with my sincere thanks for your highly obliging communication of the 26th August. From the well known & established character of Mr. Kittredge I have no doubt he will give entire satisfaction in, and faithfully perform all the duties of the office to which you have seen fit to appoint him. his commission I believe has not yet reached here but I presume it may be...
I beg your acceptance of a head of Egyptan wheat, in high preservation, which was produced the last Season at Portsmouth New Hampshire. It is said to be very prolific, & to produce whiter flour than our common wheat. I am solicitous it should be distributed in the southern state & particularly in Virginia, & if none of it has already fallen into your hands I am sure you will give it a fair...
§ From Jacob Crowninshield. 3 January 1806, Washington. “I beg leave to transmit to you several documents in the case of the Schooner Rover of Boston, Reuban Carver Master, captured by an English private armed vessel, and condemned at Burmuda in April 1796. The decree of condemnation appears to have been reversed in ’99 with costs & damages. The award exceeded fifteen hundred pounds sterling,...
Jacob Crowninshield has had the honor to receive Mr. Jefferson’s note of yesterday. he has no exact account of the fish to which Mr. Jefferson alludes but supposes the cost was somewhere about five dollars. Jacob Crowninshield embraces this opportunity to enform Mr. Jefferson that he is not unmindful of the subject referred to Mr. Gillman & himself some time since, and as soon as the situation...
At the request of Captn. Willm. Silsbee of Salem Masstts. I enclose you the letter, addressed to you, of an Arabian merchant of distinction, residing in Moka in which you are informed that he had sent you two Camels, which I am sorry to add have both died on the passage, at least I presume, that on board the Ship Mary & Eliza has met with some accident, as no mention is made of it, altho’ the...
It is with great pleasure I comply with the request of a respectable Committee of the town of Salem Masstts in delivering you the enclosed Memorial, on the late violation of our neutral rights by the British Government. A copy has been addressed to the Senate & House of Representatives. In my own opinion the Memorial is one of the best state papers which has been presented to Congress on this...
§ From Jacob Crowninshield. 14 March 1806, Washington. “I have received the enclosed documents relating to the capture and condemnation in the Island of Jamaica, of the Ship Hazard Benjn. Bullock master, belonging to the port of Salem Masstts, and agreeably to the request of Messrs. John & Richard Gardner, the owners of the Ship and Cargo, I beg leave to transmit them to you, accompanied by...
In common cases and with ordinary men, I should not expect to be forgiven had I neglected their communications so long as I have yours. I am indeed quite mortified in finding your highly obliging letter dated as far back as the 13th of May. and I can only rest my claim for pardon on your goodness, a bank on which I have drawn in times past. it was not my intention to omit acknowledging my...
It is only lately I recollected the promise I made to you at the moment of leaving Washington to hand you some remarks on the American trade to the British West Indies, and generally in relation to our commerce with England & her possessions. Most certainly I did not intend to postpone the sketch I might make to the present late period. My neglect is quite unpardonable. The subject occurring...
I enclose Mr Garland’s letter just rec’d from Baltimore. I regret extremely to find you have never rec’d the fish. it was sent in the middle of the summer from Salem, & the Captain is now upon his second voyage. from what is mentioned in the letter I can not but expect you’ll soon hear of it. With the highest respect I am your obedt servt DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I highly estimate, as I ought, the confidence reposed in me by your communications of the 26th. of March, which I had the honor to receive yesterday, and in a few days will, with pleasure proceed to give my opinion at large, on such commercial arti cles of the new Treaty with England, as have been submitted to me, but it having ocourred to me that on points so important as seem to be embraced...
In compliance with your request of the 26th. March, I have the pleasure to send you the commercial statements which I promised in my letter of the 7th. inst. You will find ten sheets, numbered regularly. The important subjects presented to me demanded my immediate attention, but I have been most unfortunately situated from sickness in my family, and could not comply with the promise I had made...