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Cherishing an anxious sollicitude that the welfare of our country, and your reputation should rest on the same permanent basis I take the liberty of submitting a few observations to your consideration. Communications from members of the state legislature of Penna. and information variously derived elsewhere compells me to believe that any peace concluded with Britain short of the cession of...
Much uncertainty respecting the propriety of the step I am now about to take, has agitated my mind, since the rising of the court appointed to try Genl. Wilkinson which ceased on information received yesterday—that upon Saturday last their proceedings had not been laid before you. Duty to the public—Justice to Genl. Wilkinson & respect for you prevail, & impell me to lay one fact, among many...
I hope you will pardon this intrusion in the midst of those momentuous affairs which must now press upon your attention. At the request of Mr. Lloyd I now address you in his behalf. I have witnessed some experiments on his late discovery. I presume not on being competent to decide its merit. But it appears to me worthy of a full & fair trial. As, either in the army or navy, it might be...
Your customary card has renewed an embarrassment under which I have labored since the first & only time I attended your table as a guest. Living recluse from intercourse with polished society—unacquainted with the regulations of their ceremonial—and diffident of the conduct I ought to observe—I at that time committed a blunder—which may have been construed into rudeness—where I could have no...
Disapproving of the selection for appointment to office from the members of the house of representatives in Congress, for reasons which have hitherto been satisfactory to my mind, the scenes I have witnessed here have not diminished the force of the objections which offer against that mode of selection. From a late application, made to me as a representative in that body, from Penna., in...
If the liberty so frequently taken in addressing you privately, on subjects of national concern, had proceeded from vanity or selfishness, I could not indulge a hope that they would meet with a favorable reception. But an earnest desire to promote the public welfare governing all my communications I am again encouraged to address a few observations to you on the subject of our present fiscal...
I have the honor to submit for your consideration, a draft of the instructions prepared to be sent to the Commissioners appointed to treat with the Chickasaw Indians. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, Sir, your Obt. Servant. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
Such frequent obtrusion, on your notice, may be deemed equally presuming & impertinent. Rectitude of intention towards you & the public can alone plead in my vindication. Your candor will induce you to meet that motive with indulgence. On a former occasion I took the liberty of intimating that the responsibility, of any present adjournment of the two houses of Congress, should rest wholly on...
Where integrity of motive is apparent it merits indulgence; & will plead for any impropriety which anxiety to promote the public welfare may undesignedly occasion. In a government, with powers & interests so divided & blended frequent & candid communication of views & intentions becomes indispensable, to the exercise of these with unity & efficacy. Where a great national crisis calls for...
Permit me to apologize for the liberty thus taken in addressing you on a subject of considerable importance—which requires a prompt decision provided you feel duly authorized to apply the remedy. Great abuses exist in the management of the militia of Penna. Whether these arise from defects in the laws—in the orders given for their execution, or, in the improper construction of either—must be...