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On my coming from England in 1793 I brought with me a very good collection of minerals: the principal part of which were in some manner or other lost at the Custom house so that I never recovered them. The few remaining ores I possessed, I gave to M r Tho s Smith when he and M r Maclure paid me a visit here many years ago. M r Smith , a young man of much promise whom I dare say you knew...
I acknowledge with many thanks your kind letter giving me an account of your application to Mr Cabell . I shall be able in a year or two to form a very interesting collection of American ores and minerals, which I shall so form and arrange as to be an elementary collection for the use of Tyro’s in my part of the back Country, rather than a curious collection for the amusements amusement of...
I return you many thanks for your package . Particularly for your Statement of the Batture case, which has settled my Opinion. I understood the question but imperfectly without the assistance of your account of it. Du Ponceau sent me his Argument and Livingston’s virulent pamphlet, which however he by no means approved. I have written to him that you have converted me. I am the more interested...
I sent you about a twelve month ago, a copy of my edition of Justinian’s institutes , and another copy of my introductory lecture ; I presume you received them as I sent them if I do not mistake under M r Madison’s care. I write at present to say that I have at my disposal D r Priestley’s library and apparatus. The library consists of about 4400 Volumes of all descriptions, some of them very...
I am much obliged by your two Letters , and instructed by the legal suggestions they contain. I never knew the origin of Christianity becoming parcel of the Laws of England before. I see the Judges of New York state are determined to engraft the Christian code with their State Code; but I hope some event will take place to bring this imposition into discussion. There is in America a strange...
I say nothing about the affairs of Europe , for they are so clouded that no reasonable conjecture can be afforded by present facts. I am most willing to believe that the progress of knowledge cannot be stopt, and the dark ages renewed, even should the Bourbons again ascend the throne, but there is nothing to be expressed but hope and good wishes. Yet from the beginning of history, it appears...
I am here on business for a few days with more leisure than I usually have, and sitting down to write a few lines to you, my pen begins at once on politics, and the rather perhaps because it is a subject the more irritating as it is the more unpleasant. I brood over the events of Europe , with melancholy forebodings of what may be the case here, and with no violent predilection in favour of...
Some time ago I promised the Editor of the Port folio a paper on education, but I neglected it till your letter came. If the inclosed sh d be worth publication, I will send it for that work. Pray oblige me by any remarks that occur to you, so that I may make it as useful as I can; and return it to me. I presume your purpose will be answered by that mode of communication. RC ( MHi ); undated;...
I reply to your queries, as to the branches of science expedient to be taught in a university. The great difficulties in the outset, are, at what age and with what qualifications should a young man enter a university? How long should he continue in such an institution before he be permitted to take a degree? As to the first question—I would state it as a position which to my mind is supported...
I send you remarks on your letter to Mr Carr: not much differing from the spirit and substance of my former letter . I do not disagree with you in the least as to the measure of national happiness in the two countries, but the worst government in other respects is certainly the most powerful. Your plan of a Militia, I and Gen l John Steele took pains to recommend about the year 1802–3 but he...