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Many besides my self partake with you in the Sollicitude you express respecting our dear Friend; for no Man could carry with him more of the ardent good Wishes of his Country than Mr. Adams did. His Merit is great in denying himself so much for the Service of his Country, and your’s not a little in giving up so much domestic Happiness for the Sake of this Service. Heaven, I trust, will protect...
Having just been informed that Mr. Tudor is going to Philadelphia, I take this opportunity to thank you for the obliging favor of your letter of 29th September. The struggle, as you justly observe, between fleets and armies and commercial regulations, must be very unequal: We hope, however, the congress will carry this mode of defence as far as it will go, and endeavor to render it as early...
In Obedience to the above Order of Congress, this Committee have enquired into the Premises, and, upon the best Information obtained, find, that the Commanders of the New England Army about the 14th. ultimo received Advice that Genl. Gage had issued Orders for a Party of Troops under his Command, to post themselves on Bunkers Hill, a Promontory just at the Entrance of the Peninsula of...
I take the first Opportunity to acknowledg the Honor I receiv’d in a Letter sign’d by you as Chairman of a Committee of the Honorable Congress for obtaining a just and well authenticated account of the Hostilities committed by the Ministerial Troops and Navy &c., and desiring me to take some Part in this Business. You will be so good as to present my Compliments to the other Gentlemen of the...
I wrote last Thursday Morning by the Post to our Friend Mr. S. Adams—to which I refer you on some Things of a public Nature. After so many Weeks Possession of this Town you would be surpriz’d to see in what a defenceless State we still remain. The Business of Fortifying has lain between Genl. Ward and a Committee of the General Court: Between them both, little or nothing has yet been done. We...
By the last Post I received your’s of May 6th. and am not troubled at your Acceptance of the Resignation of G. W. He is, indeed, a cool prudent Man, and accepted the Post of Danger for his Country at a critical Time, when others seem’d to decline it. He is a through New England Man in his Principles and Inclinations, but not made for an high Command in the Field. I cannot wholly excuse any...
I find by your Letter of 16th. Instant that you had no Expectation of the disagreable News from Canada. Our Accounts from thence are not very perfect. According to these, A Reinforcement for Quebec came up the River before the City on 6th. of this Month. Our Army suddenly retir’d, leaving good Part at least, of Cannon Baggage, and their sick. They had determin’d it is said, in a Council of...
We are full of anxious Expectation here. Howe has sail’d from Hallifax, it is suppos’d for N. York, and is probably there before this Time, for he left the former place on 10th June as we have been inform’d by several Masters of Vessels arriv’d here. Just after receiving this Advice we were alarm’d with an Account of the Plot at N. York. The Discovery seems very fortunate, and the whole may...
It gives me high Pleasure, if my Narration of Nantasket was acceptable to you. I did not lay the least Imputation upon your Neighbors. They did all that Circumstances would allow. Canada, you know, lay much upon my Mind. I was long ago apprehensive. There was too much Neglect on all Sides of that important Quarter, and, without doubt, great Misconduct there. Pray let it be strictly examin’d,...
Your Letter of June 10, in Answer to mine on the Continental Currency, I have now to thank you for. Who brought it I know not, but it was never deliver’d to me till four days ago. A Number of the most sensible Gentlemen among us, with whom I have convers’d upon the Subject are fully of opinion that there is no Way they can at present think of, so effectual to promote public Credit in the...
I scratch a Line in utmost Hast—Your kind Letter I receiv’d by Mr Jackson the Day after sending one to you. Your Tickets sell rapidly. Your Loan Office will fill apace. I wrote to you, or Mr Adams on the American Navy. Manly’s Character rises here. He has sail’d to Cape Ann for some Men there and has press’d thro great Difficulties to get out—something must be done to expedit Matters in that...
I wish, with you, that N. England may not fail to furnish their Quota of the Continental Army even to a single man; but am afraid we shall not be able to accomplish it soon. Some Towns have already rais’d and sent forward their full Proportion. This has done much more, besides Manning the State Vessels and Privateers: but others are yet greatly deficient; and yet all Circum­ stances...
I have lately wrote you more than one Letter which I hope you have receiv’d. Howe has confess’d his Inferiority in the Field by retreating from the Jerseys, but I am sorry He has escap’d so whole. I have been in Hopes that our Army would have been strong enough to have taken some Station between Brunswick and Amboy, and to have cripled Him in his Retreat if not totally cut it off. I long for...
No Event since the Commencement of the War has excited such Indignation and Astonishment as the Evacuation of Tyconderoga in so disgraceful a Manner! General Washington’s Idea of the State of that Garrison answers to all the Accounts we have receiv’d here. There were 4000 Troops in the Place well arm’d, and well supplied with ev’ry Thing. Two of the fullest Regiments of this State were at...
I write to you in Hast and Confidence—and beg you to conceal me when I speak with Freedom of Men and Things. After many Reports that Burgoyne and his Army were Prisoners of War, we have this Day receiv’d the Articles agreed on between him and our General. Perhaps I may be mistaken, but my Joy is damp’d by the Concessions G ates has made, considering how totally Burgoyne was in our Power. He...
Two days agoe I wrote you an hasty Script. Perhaps I express’d myself too suddenly and strongly upon an important Subject. The Terms which Gates has given Burgoyne might be as well for the States as Circumstances would allow; tho I own, from what Glover, and ev’ry Officer on the Spot had written, I concluded the Enemy must have been totally in our Power. But if we have not all we could wish,...
After various Reports of the Capture of the Boston by a British Cruizer, and of her being struck with Lightning at Sea, it was with peculiar Pleasure I lately receiv’d an Assurance Of your Safe Arrival in France. Not long after you sail’d, Mrs. Adams wrote me a Letter upon a Report of Dr. Franklin’s having been assassinated, full of the tenderest Anxiety, and the most amiable Sentiments,...
Four days ago I received the Favor of your Letter of Aug: 12th., and it gave me the highest Pleasure to hear you were well. The Marquiss de la Fayette will do me the Honour to take the Charge of this Letter who carries with him the Esteem and Affection of the Army and the States. His Intrepidity and Discretion, his Conduct in the Field, in Council, and in all private Circles have gained him an...
The very kind Readiness which you express’d to me, to allow my Grandson to be a Companion to your Sons in the Voyage to France has laid me under an Obligation that I can never forget: Accordingly I now commit him to you happy in the Perswasion that he will pursue his Studies with them under your Eye, and Direction. His Father who accompanies him to the Ship will most gratefully acknowledge...
The Marquiss de la Fayette did me the Honour to deliver me the Letter you kindly wrote by Him. As his arrival diffused a general Joy, every Expression of it was given here that circumstances would allow, and particular Respects were paid by the Government as well as the People at large to this prudent and gallant young Nobleman who keeps the Cause of America so warm at his Heart. In these...
I have but a Moment to write by the Mars, a Vessel belonging to this State, the Voyage having been kept secret upon political Accounts. I congratulate you on the Arrival of the Fleet from Brest at Newport, commanded by the Chevalier de Ternay, after a Passage of about 10 Weeks: not a single Vessel of the whole Fleet missing. You will hear before this reaches you of the Loss of Charlestown, in...
Being Just inform’d of an opportunity of writing to you by the Way of Bilboa, I snatch my Pen, to give you a laconic Account of Things here. Last Monday all the Towns in this State assembled for Choice of a Governor, Lt. Governor, and Senators, according to the New Constitution, of the peaceable Establishment of which, I gave you some Account in my last. In this Town, for Governor Mr. S. Adams...
Colonel Johonnot who sails in the Frigate Alliance, I expected would have tarried with us a day or two longer. His sudden and unexpected Call to go on Board this Ship which now lies at some Distance from the Town allows me but a Moment to write you. The Colonel can give you all the News. Colonel Laurens who goes in the same Vessel upon some secret and important Errand of Congress is capable of...
We have received here with uncommon Pleasure the Accounts of the Success of your important Negotiations in Holland notwithstanding the Opposition and Traversings of a pow’rful British Party in that Country. By the last Vessel from France, which left Nants the Beginning of June, we are told, that the Independence of these States has been acknowledged by all the States of Holland, and your...
I find that Mr. Lovell is the only Man in Boston capable of decyphering intricate papers. I have conversed with him upon the subject & shown him the method in which the figures are placed. He despairs of being able to find a Key to the papers, but will nevertheless wait upon your Excellency to see if there is a possibility of obtaining a Key by which he can decypher them. I am with great...
AL (draft): British Museum I am now to acknowledg the repeated Favor of your Letters, with the Notes of Mr. P.’ Speech in Parliament, the arguments on the Dissenting Cause; and the Political Pamphlets, in which you have given me no small Entertainment. I could not forbear communicating what you wrote to some particular Friends, to whom I knew it would give great Pleasure, and to allow some...
ALS (draft): British Museum My State of Health, and Excursions upon that Account into the Country must be my Excuse for not taking an earlier Notice of your very obliging Packet of 8th June, for which I return you my particular Thanks. Your Letter and Replies to Mr. Strahan’s Questions gave me great Pleasure, tho the closing and prophetic Part coming from one so capable of discerning amidst...
ALS (draft): British Museum I wrote you the 6. Inst. acknowledging the Receit. of your very obliging Packet of June 8th. and mentioning the Use I have made of your Letter &c among some of the leading Men in our H. of Represent. in whom I could confide. They agreed with me that your Principles were incontestible, your reasoning clear and conclusive, and supported by History and Fact. The King...
ALS (draft): British Museum In my last of Novr [15] I mention’d the Uses I had made of the Sentiments you were pleas’d to communicate to me, and the Effect they had upon the leading Men of our House of Commons. I did this with much Caution as that no Disadvantage can acrue to you from any Quarter. The same Caution I shall ever use respecting my Friends on your Side the Water who are so good as...
ALS (draft): British Museum I should sooner have acknowledg’d the Receit of your Favors of Decemr 30. and Feby 5. had not the State of my Health call’d me out of Town, and oblig’d me to be sparing in Writing. My Thanks are due to you for writing me with so much Freedom and I endeavor to make the best Use of what you communicate to me. Your Interposition in Favor of the Charter was kind, and...