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Whereas since the Accession of the present King, Parliament has claimed a Power of Right to bind the People of the Colonies in North America by Statutes in all Cases whatsoever: And for carrying the said Power into Execution, has by some Statutes expressly taxed the People of the said Colonies, and by divers other Statutes under various Pretences, but in Fact, for the Purpose of raising a...
Resolved That the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and the Town of Boston are now nobly Suffering and Struggling in the common Cause of American Freedom and therefore that it is the indispensible Duty of all the Colonies, to Support them by every necessary Means, and to the last Extremity. Resolved That Should Whereas Hostilities have been already been commenced against the Province of...
The Delegates from the Several Provinces in North America, now assembled in Congress, beg Leave to address your Excellency upon Subjects of very great Importance, to your own Character to your own Happiness and Peace of Mind, as well to his Majestys Service, and to the Welfare of the Province over which you preside, and of all North America, perhaps of the whole British Empire. Your Situation...
Whereas, since the close of the last war, the British parliament claiming a power of right to bind the people of America by statutes in all cases whatsoever, hath in some acts expressly imposed taxes on them, and in others, under various pretences, but in fact for the purpose of raising a revenue, hath imposed rates and duties payable in these colonies, established a board of commissioners...
We his Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Delegates of the several Colonies of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Three Lower Counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, deputed to represent them in a Continental Congress, held in the City of...
LS : Library of Congress This letter from the Congress over the signature of its president carried to England the official news, so long awaited, of what had happened in Philadelphia. The letter was drafted at the end of the session by a committee of two and approved on the last day, October 26. Charles Thomson, the Secretary of the Congress, enclosed it in a covering letter of the same date...
I n C ongress T he delegates of the United Colonies of New-hampshire, Massachusetts bay, Rhode-island, Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, New Castle Kent & Sussex on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina T o G eorge W ashington Esquire W e reposing especial trust and confidence in your patriotism, conduct and fidelity Do by these presents constitute and...
In Congress This Congress having appointed you to be General & Commander in chief of the army of the United Colonies and of all the forces raised or to be raised by them and of all others who shall voluntarily offer their service and join the said army for the defence of American liberty and for repelling every hostile invasion thereof, you are to repair with all expedition to the colony of...
A Declaration by the Reprensentatives of the United Colonies of North-America, now met in Congress at Philadelphia, setting forth the Causes and Necessity of their taking up Arms. if it was possible for Men, who exercise their Reason to believe, that the Divine Author of our Existence intended a Part of the human Race to hold an absolute Property in, and an unbounded Power over others, marked...
We your Majesty’s faithful subjects of the colonies of Newhampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode island and Providence plantations, Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the counties of New Castle Kent and Sussex on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, in behalf of ourselves and the inhabitants of these colonies, who have deputed us to represent them in...
THE several Assemblies of New Jersey , Pennsylvania and Virginia , having refered to the Congress a resolution of the House of Commons of Great Britain , which resolution is in these words, viz. Lunae , 20° die Feb. 1775. The House in a Committee on the American papers. Motion made, and question proposed . That
Resolved , That a letter be sent by Express to Genl Washington, to inform him, that they Congress having received certain intelligence of the sailing of two north country built Brigs, of no force, from England, on the 11 of August last, loaded with arms, powder, and other stores, for Quebec, without a convoy, which it being of importance to intercept, that he apply to the council of...
The Committee appointed to enquire, what Powder has been Sent to the Army in the Northern Department, have attended that service and beg Leave to report That five Thousand Weight of Powder, sent from South Carolina, has been forwarded to the said Army. 5000 wt. That Two Thousand one hundred and thirty six Pounds Weight have been forwarded to the Same Army from the City of Philadelphia. 2136...
The continental congress having been pleased to appoint us a committe for collecting an account of the hostilities committed by the ministerial troops and navy in America, since last March, with proper evidence of the truth of the facts related, the number and value of the buildings destroyed, and of the vessels inward and outward bound seised, by them as nearly as can be ascertained, and also...
3 November 1775. Dft not found. printed : JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress , 1774–1789, Washington, 1904–1937; 34 vols. , 3:319. Based on a report (not found) from a committee appointed 26 October composed of John Rutledge, JA , Samuel Ward, Richard Henry Lee, and Roger Sherman, which reported on 3 November ( same Worthington C. Ford and others,...
Resolved That every member of this Congress considers himself under the ties of virtue, honor and love of his Country not to divulge directly or indirectly any matter or thing agitated or debated in Congress before the same shall have been determined, without leave of the Congress; nor any matter or thing determined in Congress which a majority of the Congress shall order to be kept secret,...
A Declaration by the Representatives of the United colonies in Congress. When necessity compelled us to take arms against Great Britain in defence of our just rights, we thought it a circumstance of comfort that our enemy was brave and civilized. It is the happiness of modern times that the evils of necessary war are softened by refinement of manners and sentiment, and that an enemy is an...
Resolved , That it be recommended to the several Assemblies, Conventions, Councils or Committees of Safety, and Committees of Correspondence and Inspection in the United Colonies, to exert themselves in devising farther ways and means of promoting and encouraging the manufacture of Salt-petre, and of introducing that manufacture into private families. Resolved , That it be recommended to the...
Resolved , That the gentlemen who are appointed to go into Canada, be desired to enquire into the cause of the imprisonment of the officers of Militia, in that country and others, and take such measures in concert with the commanding officer of the continental forces there, for their enlargement or confinement, as are consistent with the principles of justice, and the safety of the United...
You are, with all convenient despatch, to repair to Canada, and make known to the people of that country, the wishes and intentions of the Congress with respect to them. Represent to them, that the arms of the United Colonies, having been carried into that province for the purpose of frustrating the designs of the British court against our common liberties, we expect not only to defeat the...
It gives me the most sensible Pleasure to convey to you, by Order of Congress, the only Tribute, which a free People will ever consent to Pay; the Tribute of Thanks and Gratitude to their Friends and Benefactors. The disinterested and patriotic Principles which led you to the Field, have also led you to Glory: and it affords no little Consolation to your Countrymen to reflect, that, as a...
Whereas his Britannic Majesty, in conjunction with the lords and commons of Great Britain, has, by a late act of Parliament, excluded the inhabitants of these United Colonies from the protection of his crown; And whereas, no answer, whatever, to the humble petitions of the colonies for redress of grievances and reconciliation with Great Britain, has been or is likely to be given; but, the...
13. Resolved that the Commissioners in Canada and General Schuyler be informed that We cannot give them any positive assurance of maintaining our Army there by hard Money, but that We are this might not check discourage our Operations, Congress being determined to send from these Colonies, the necessary Supplies of Provisions and all other Necessaries if hard Money cannot be obtained, and that...
The Committee to whom was referred the Letter from Eseck Hopkins Commodore of the Continental Fleet dated Providence May 22 1776, have taken the same into Consideration and come to the following Resolutions. Resolved that Mr. Charles Walker of N. Providence ought to be paid the Value of the Sloop Endeavour, together with four Tons of Lignum Vita and one hundred Cedar Posts taken by the said...
[ Ed. Note: This document is TJ’s text of the Declaration as copied into his Notes of Proceedings in the Continental Congress, 7 June to 1 Aug. 1776 (which was eventually incorporated in his Autobiography) and is printed above as part of these Notes (q.v., p. 315), above; a facsimile text is available in Boyd, Declaration of Independence , 1945, pl. viii . This copy (actually there are two,...
IN CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1776. THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION OF THE THIRTEEN UNITED STATES OF AMERICA , When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect...
The Committee to whom were referred, the Letter from William Palfrey Esqr. Paymaster General, dated New York 19 May, in closing his Weekly Account ending 18 May 1776, and another Letter from the said Paymaster General dated at N. York 3 June 1776 inclosing his Weekly interest Return to May 31, have considered the same and come to the following Resolutions, vizt. Resolved, as the opinion of...
There Shall be a firm, inviolable, and universal Peace, and a true and Sincere Friendship between the most Serene and mighty Prince, Lewis the Sixteenth, the most Christian King his Heirs and Successors, and the united States of America; and the Subjects of the most Christian King, and of the Said States; and between the Countries, Islands, Cities, and Towns Situate under the Jurisdiction of...
The Committee appointed to consider what Harbours are proper to be fortified, have attended that Service, and come to the following Resolutions. vizt Resolved as the opinion of this Committee, that the Harbour of Cape Ann, in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, ought to be fortified, and to this End that Twenty Pieces of large Cannon, with Ten Eighteen Pounders and Ten Twenty four Pounders, be...
When in the Course of human Events it becomes necessary for a People to advance from that Subordination, in which they have hitherto remained and to assume among the Powers of the Earth, the equal and independent Station to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitle them, a decent Respect to the Opinions of Man­ kind requires that they Should declare the Causes, which impell them to...