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The Heads of departments, to whom, by an act of Congress of last Session the furnishing of the President’s house was enjoined , finding it difficult to get an agent to act in that business, prevailed on me, about six or seven weeks ago, to undertake it.—Many difficulties which I had not foreseen, as well as some which I was then acquainted with, shortly presented themselves—Amongst the most...
I have thought it my duty to inform you, that at four oClock this morning the late president left this house, which, by order of the Secretary of the Treasury , I took possession of immediately— I have the honor to be with the most sincere Respect & esteem, Your most obt. Hble. Svt. RC ( MHi ); endorsed by TJ as received 4 Mch. and so recorded in SJL . Thomas Claxton (d. 1821), the doorkeeper...
I am preparing to Start from this place for Philadelphia on Thursday next, and beg leave to lay before you a view of such Articles as appear to me to be necessary for the further completion of the furnishing of the Presidents House—Nothing Sir, would trouble my mind more than, (by progressing according to my own ideas, without your concurrence) to derange any plan which you may have formed...
I this day purchased your copying press —it is made on an entire new construction, being worked on the same principle of common printing presses with a screw and lever—it is the first that has been purchased in this city, and on that account I had it conveyed to my friend Mr M. Carey, who made an experiment on it in my presence, and pronounced it far superior to the old kind—any number of...
I yesterday received from Philadelphia a Bill of Lading for your chairs , which I have this day forwarded to Messrs Gibson & Jefferson at Richmond—I have thought it proper to forward this information, in order that the first opportunity of getting them to Monticello may be embraced I have the honor to be with the greatest esteem Sir Your Hble Svt RC ( MHi ); endorsed by TJ as received 13 Aug....
Some time prior to your departure from this place, I think you informed me that your return would take place about the first of October, which is about a month hence—a space of time not sufficient to have the six Sophas made and forwarded to Monticello before you leave it—As I have concluded they could be of no service during your present visit, and knowing the difficulty of explaining to many...
It gives me great mortification to be obliged to inform you that there is no prospect of being furnished with the grates I ordered in June—not even one is yet done, and I have stopped any farther progress being made by a man who has not only deceived me by repeated promises, but also falsely told half a dozen people who I had occasionally requested to call on him, that they were nearly...
If, in your judgement, I should appear to be as well qualified to take the charge of the Congressional Library, as any other person who might be willing to accept of that appointment—and if there should be no infringment of the constitution, by my holding the Station which I now possess, as well as the other ,—I should be happy to be considered as a candidate for that office—Having the honor...
A few days ago , I took the liberty of offering myself as a candidate for the office of Librarian, under certain conditions which I mentioned—At the time I wrote the letter I was much hurried with business, and was perhaps rather short in giving the reasons why I had not furnished myself with recommendations, which I perceive some of the applicants very industriously procuring at this period—I...
Before I left the City of Washington you mentioned a floor Cloth which you wished to have painted on Canvass—Since I have been here, I have seen a kind of grass matting which is used by the genteelest people,—it is, in my estimation very handsom and comes cheaper even than the common painted cloths of this country—Inclosed, Sir, you have a specimen of the stuff—it is a yard and a half wide and...