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Major General St Clair Lt Col Carrington and Lt. Col Hamilton give it as their opinion as the result of the conversation held upon the subject that the most likely plan for effecting the exchange in contemplation is to confine it to the unexceptionable characters on both sides first exchanging all the prisoners of war and then the troops of convention for the balance, according to the...
To His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of The United States of America. We The Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency “to treat, confer, determine and conclude upon a General Cartel for the exchange and accommodation of prisoners of war including the troops of The Convention of Saratoga and all matters whatsoever which might be properly...
In addition to the official report of our proceedings at Amboy, which your Excellency will perceive have terminated in the manner you expected, we have the honor to give you an account of the steps we took, in consequence of the second part of your instructions, relative to a private conversation. But before we enter upon this, we think it our duty to inform you, that we have every reason to...
We beg leave to inform Your Excellency, that in the private report of our proceedings at Amboy dated the 26th. March, we omitted mentioning, (though it is to be inferred) that in the conversation which passed on the subject of accounts, it was explicitly declared by us, that if any particular sum should be accepted agreeable to the ideas of The British Gentlemen, it was not in any manner to be...
The private letter which you was so good as to accompany your Official communication with, calls for and has my warmest acknowledgements. The point which I have mentioned in my Official letter, as determining my acceptance of the Office of Supervisor, would have produced that issue, had the measure been less eligible in other respects than it really is, but had I upon any consideration been...
The enclosed papers contain parts of the information which I expect to furnish upon the subject of Manufactures in Virginia, and are transmitted agreeably to your request. These papers have come from the two lower Surveys of the District; the information they contain as to the particular Neighbourhoods from which they are drawn, may be applied, with propriety to the whole of those Surveys:...
Since mine of the 4th. Instant, covering some information upon Manufactures, I have received an additional report from General Stevens, Inspector of Survey No. 2, which, together with his letter, and a Copy of one he received from one of his Collectors I now do myself the pleasure to enclose. It was my intention, at first, to have obtained the Reports of all the Inspectors, and then have made...
The pressing necessities of the army, the late season of the year, and the difficulty of conveying information through the country, in it’s present situation, have prevented that extensive notice of contracts for the subsistence of the troops, which could be wished. General Greene, very early after the contracts were directed to be made, wrote to every character, whose circumstances and views...
I do myself the honor to hand you herewith, a Contract entered into by Mr. John Banks, for the subsistence of the troops in the service of the United States, in the States of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, for the present year. I am really concerned, that we have been obliged to close this contract, on the execessive high terms agreed to, but the circumstances, under which we had...
Towards the latter end of the year 1782, when the engagement of the State of South Carolina, to supply the southern army with provisions, was to expire, the honorable Robert Morris, Superintendant of Finance, wrote to General Greene, to have a contract formed for supporting the army, from the first of January 1783. General Greene requested my assistance in the business, and public notice, as...
Sometime in the early part of the year 1783, during General Greene’s residence in Charleston, I received a message from him, requesting my attendance at his quarters. Upon my coming there, I met with General Wayne. General Greene told us, he had desired our attendance, in order that we might be present at an interview, he was about to have with Mr. John Banks, whom he had sent for—that he had...
[ Richmond, May 17, 1792 . On July 11, 1792, Tench Coxe wrote to Carrington: “In your letter of the 17th. of May last, addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury, you acquaint him of the Resignation of Mr. James Wells … I presumed you are informed, that Mr. Cowpland Parker has been appointed surveyor and consequently Inspector for that port.” Letter not found. ] See Josiah Parker to H, May 11,...
By last post I received an Answer from Colo. Newton to my enquiries concerning a successor to Mr. Wells at Smithfield. He says that Mr. Copeland Parker is under the Character of an industrious attentive Man, and he thinks as proper a person for the Offices of Inspector & Surveyor as any to be engaged there. He also informs me that Colo. Lindsay has appointed him to Act during the vacancy. I...
[ Richmond, July 11, 1792. On July 25, 1792, Hamilton wrote to Carrington : “I have received … your two letters of the 11 instant.” Letters not found. ]
I have been favored with a packet from you containing several Copies of your letter of the 4th. Instant to the Speaker of the House of Representatives. I had fully anticipated the decided contradictions contained in this letter, to the suggestions which gave rise to it, having seen the Resolutions alluded to. The Copies of the letter are circulated as far as the Numbers would admit, and I...
With very great pleasure I have complied with your request in getting the final proceedings of the House of Representatives inserted in the most public and generally circulating paper of this place, and sent them to Norfolk Petersburg Alexandria & Winchester with a request through my friends at these places, that they be inserted in their papers, which will certainly be done. The votes of Colo...
I am favored with your[s] of the 10th. Instant. Your determination to persevere with patience in your labors to establish a permanent and successful system of Revenue & credit for the United States, must give satisfaction to all who feel that these are the only supports of public safety and private prosperity. I am well assured that, in private life, you experienced pecuniary advantages, and...
I am favored with yours of the 15th June, with a Copy of the Account which accompanied your report, of the same date, to the President. It is true that suggestions such as you have heard have been thrown out here, and, according to the disposition of the hearers, have been credited and discredited. This you must expect will be the case, until time or events, shall take from your Persecutors...
[ Richmond, December 19, 1793. On June 24, 1794, Hamilton wrote to George Washington and referred to “Another letter from mr Carrington of 19th. of December last.” Letter not found. ]
[ Richmond, March 18, 1794. On May 18 19 , 1794, Carrington wrote to Hamilton and referred to “mine of the 18th of March.” Letter not found. ]
Yours of the 8th. Instant covering a letter for Mr. Augustine Davis the post Master at this place was recd. two posts ago, and was instantly delivered to himself by my own hands. Yours of the same date directing that the Expences incurred in forwarding your letters of the 26th March & 18th April to sundry Collectors of the Customs in this district, are to constitute charges against the public...
I do not write this letter as congratulatory upon the final issue of the enquiry into the Treasury department, as I never conceived you exposed to receive injury therefrom. I write to express my most sincere wishes that you will not suffer the illiberality with which you have been treated, to deprive the public of your services, at least until the Storm which hangs over us, and is to be...
You have upon sundry occasions done me the favor to request my opinions upon the public Sentiment in Virginia. Conceiving that there can never have been an occurrence giving you greater anxiety than the present Insurgency in the Western parts of Pensylvania, or upon which a knowledge of the public opinions and dispositions here could be more interesting, I anticipate your request, and proceed...
[ Richmond, November 23, 1794. On December 2, 1794, Hamilton wrote to Carrington : “Your letter of the 23rd of November is this moment received.” Letter not found. ]
I have been favored with yours of the 1st Instant. All accounts from the scene of the late insurrection agree that the measures which have been pursued have been as successful in their issue, as they were wise in their commencement. I have also the satisfaction of finding that our returned Troops pretty generally agree, that a less force than was called forth would have been opposed, and that...
I have been favored with yours of the 19th. Instant covering your private letter of the same date to Governor Lee. I hear he has left Winchester, & will probably be here tomorrow or next day, and have thought it best to keep his letter until his arrival. The explanations contained in this letter to him, are such as I had anticipated, as you might have perceived from mine to you of the 11th....
By the last Mail I had the Honor to receive yours of the 29th. Ult. communicating the Presidents offer of the place of Comptroller of the Treasury. Calls to public Office from that source can never be received by me but with immotions of the highest reverence and gratification, dictated as they uniformly are by motives of public good, they constitute the most flattering evidences of merit,...
The absence of the Clerk of our House of Delegates where I believe are lodged the authenticated reports of the debt redeemed from year to year has prevented my complying with your request, in the manner, and so early, as I wished. He is at the Springs for his Health, & no person is authorised to shew his records. He has not yet returned, & having lately learned that his health continues bad, I...
In mine of sometime in June I promised you, by this date, a more full communication on the subject of State debt redeemed by Virginia from the end of the War with great Britain, to the end of the year 1789. Having made the best inquiry this subject will admit of, I am Satisfied that the following Statement is pretty right, that is to say Redeemed by Taxes, Sales of Land &c 2,613,692 dols....
Richmond, January 3, 1797. “I have just now seen Mr Wade Mosby of my Neighbourhood in the Country, whose Agent … has just returned from N. York where he has employed you in a Suit to which Mr Mosby is a party. He wishes me to say to you what his Character & circumstances are. I have known him from his Childhood to this day, and can with confidence say he is a man who has supported the...
I have received your friendly and confidential letter of the 7th. Inst. and am much obliged by your information as to the state of public opinion in the Eastern & Middle states in regard to the approaching presidential election. In return I will give you such as I possess Southwardly; yours however must be far the most perfect, as to particular circumstances, from your late tour through the...
Plan of exchange for the Troops of Convention, in three Divisions to be formed as equally, as the exchanging by Corps will allow, from the Strength of the Rank & file, each of the two first Divisions to have a Major General and a Brigadier General, and the third The Lieutenant General and a Brigadier General exchanged with them. The Regiments to which the Brigadier Generals belong to be...
[ Richmond, July 5, 1799. The description of this letter in the dealer’s catalogue reads: “… about the appointment of an aide-de-camp. ‘… Contracts are now in operation at every place assigned as recruiting stations … and at them such temporary arrangements are made as enable the Officers to be proceeding.’” Letter not found. ] The Collector: A Magazine for Autograph and Historical Collectors...
I received your letter of the 3d. Instant inclosing two plans which have been in contemplation for a division of the State of Virginia into districts for the Recruiting Service, and mentioning that it was probable I had before recd. from the Secretary of War one of the plans, A, as a guide in forming Contracts. I have never recd. from the Secretary of War either of those plans. In a letter...
Since I enclosed you, on the 31st. Instant the plan which I had formed for Recruiting divisions of Virginia, I have seen Lt Colo. Bentley who satisfies me that Abingdon which I arranged as in Colo. Parkers circle, more properly applies to the other. I have therefore written to Colo. Parker that this Station is to be considered as arranged in Colo. Bentleys circle, and that this plan is so far...
I beg you to be assured that I have not been inattentive to your request in regard to an Aid de Camp—From my more early enquiries I was apprehensive that the appointments in Virginia would not afford you a choice to your satisfaction; But finding that Colo. Bentley was about, from time to time, to have meetings with his officers at this place, I thought it best to wait until that better means...
The following are the Contracts which have been entered into for Supplies to the Recruiting Stations in Virginia vz Charles M. Thruston for the Stations of Winchester, Leesburg, Fauquier Court House Culpeper Court House, Moorfield & Morgan Town & their vicinities. date 9th. May 1799 Godlove Heiskel for Fredericksburg and the Counties annexed to it—date June 21. 1799 Alexander Humphreys for...
We the Subscribers, beg leave to assure Your Excellency that, we profess the greatest deference and respect, for the honorable Board of General Officers which on the 15th Instant, settled the Rank of the Regiments of Artillery; and we hereby declare our full conviction, that no partiality influenced them, in making the arrangement. But as the Board inadvertently proceeded to make the...
I have the pleasure to acquaint your Excellency, that twelve Justices, & several, Active, Militia Officers, met at this place last night, & have decisively taken on them the business of collecting & delivering the grain & cattle required from this County, agreable, in point of time, & every other respect, to the address with which I had the Honor to be sent them. those Gentlemen are so...
Permit me to offer you my most sincere congratulations on your return from the Feild to those pleasing scenes of domestic life which you left with regret. In contemplating the great event which has closed your Military life, be assured that no Fellow Citizen is inspired with more gratitude towards you than myself—but to the Common feelings of my Countrymen, I have to add, as an individual, my...
At the same moment that I am assured your Excellencies own inclinations would have been infinitely more gratified in domestic than in public life, I must beg leave to offer my sincere congratulations upon the unanimity with which your Country men, divided as they have been in every other political act, have called you to the highest and most important Trust in the Republic, as it evidences the...
I had the honor a few days ago to receive your Letter of the 30th Ult. enclosing a Commission for the Office of District Marshal for Virginia, together with sundry Acts upon the Judiciary system. The confidence you are pleased Sir, to repose in me, in confering this Commission, is an evidence of your good opinion exceedingly flattering and gratifying; and the terms in which you have thought...
Enclosed I have the Honor to transmit a Voucher for the Expence of forwarding your letter to the Secretary of State as requested in yours of the 11th Instant, being thirteen dollars & one third of a dollar. the milage is that which has been established by the Executive of the State, for such Service, & a faithful Express is not to be got lower. I have the Honor to be with the greatest respect...
I have been honored with yours of the 20th Instant, and have too lively a sensibility to the terms in which you are pleased to request my services as a commissioner of the federal City, not to consult your perfect satisfaction in the reasons for my declining the Offer. They are of both a public & private nature. The business to which my present Office relates, has, from its first...
I have been honored with yours of the 28th Ultimo—The enquiry which you have been pleased to Submit to Genl Marshall & myself demands & receives our most serious attention—on his aid I rely for giving you accurate information, & he wishes an opportunity of Conversing with Colo. Innes before he decides —this we are prevented from by his absence at the Williamsburg District Court, a circumstance...
I am extremely sorry that I have not yet been enabled to give any satisfactory answer to your enquiry relating to Colo. Innes. He has not yet returned to this place; and having stoped somewhere short of Williamsburg, has been out of the way of the enquiries we have made for the purpose of ascertaining the time of his return. under this circumstance it is impossible to give you any ground...
I have been honored with yours of the 9th Instant, and immediately consulted Genl Marshall thereon. As to a change in Mr Henrys opinions upon the Constitution, he has been so little within the circle of our movements that we must rather rely on the intelligence of Genl Lee, who has had much communication with him, than our own observations. Mr Henry has for several years been in a degree...
The Express returned yesterday from Mr Henry—He was at a plantation more distant from hence than his place of residence, which occasioned the delay. I do myself the Honor to enclose herewith his answer to your letter. the agency you had been pleased to give me in your communication with that Gentleman, however unlimitted, would not have led me to take the liberty of opening his letter, had not...
Colo. Innes has just returned to Town and Genl Marshall, on a conversation with him, has formed an opinion favorable to his appointment to the Office of Attorney General. judging that too much time would be lost in my waiting for your notification of our powers on this subject being still in existence, we thought it best to sound him on the score of his acceptance, apprising him of the...
I have been honored with yours of the 1st Instant covering Twenty five dollars, the expence of the Express to Mr Henry, and receive with great Satisfaction the entire approbation you are pleased to express of the manner in which your several late requisitions have been attended to. you must before this have received the result of that which related to Colo. Innes, & I wish it had issued...