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We the Subscribers, beg leave to assure Your Excellency that, we profess the greatest deference and respect, for the honorable Board of General Officers which on the 15th Instant, settled the Rank of the Regiments of Artillery; and we hereby declare our full conviction, that no partiality influenced them, in making the arrangement. But as the Board inadvertently proceeded to make the...
I have the pleasure to acquaint your Excellency, that twelve Justices, & several, Active, Militia Officers, met at this place last night, & have decisively taken on them the business of collecting & delivering the grain & cattle required from this County, agreable, in point of time, & every other respect, to the address with which I had the Honor to be sent them. those Gentlemen are so...
Minutes of the proceedings of the Commissioners, on the part of His Excellency General Washington and of His Excellency General sir Henry Clinton. The Commissioners being met, agree to the following preliminaries. That copies of the powers should be interchanged, and they were interchanged accordingly. That the limits of the neutral ground should extend three miles round Amboy, that Town being...
Major General St Clair Lt Col Carrington and Lt. Col Hamilton give it as their opinion as the result of the conversation held upon the subject that the most likely plan for effecting the exchange in contemplation is to confine it to the unexceptionable characters on both sides first exchanging all the prisoners of war and then the troops of convention for the balance, according to the...
Plan of exchange for the Troops of Convention, in three Divisions to be formed as equally, as the exchanging by Corps will allow, from the Strength of the Rank & file, each of the two first Divisions to have a Major General and a Brigadier General, and the third The Lieutenant General and a Brigadier General exchanged with them. The Regiments to which the Brigadier Generals belong to be...
To His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of The United States of America. We The Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency “to treat, confer, determine and conclude upon a General Cartel for the exchange and accommodation of prisoners of war including the troops of The Convention of Saratoga and all matters whatsoever which might be properly...
In addition to the official report of our proceedings at Amboy, which your Excellency will perceive have terminated in the manner you expected, we have the honor to give you an account of the steps we took, in consequence of the second part of your instructions, relative to a private conversation. But before we enter upon this, we think it our duty to inform you, that we have every reason to...
We beg leave to inform Your Excellency, that in the private report of our proceedings at Amboy dated the 26th. March, we omitted mentioning, (though it is to be inferred) that in the conversation which passed on the subject of accounts, it was explicitly declared by us, that if any particular sum should be accepted agreeable to the ideas of The British Gentlemen, it was not in any manner to be...
Richmond, 25 June 1780 . Encloses “separate returns of the Officers of the Virginia, part of the first Regt. of Artillery, who are to be Actually in the Field the present Campaign—and of those who are to be otherwise situated, with notes signifying where they will be.” TJ may now distribute them according to the plan mentioned by him to Carrington a few days ago. RC ( Vi ); 3 p.; signed “Ed....
Whereas the irregular manner in which the Quarter Masters Department for the State of Virginia has hitherto been conducted, has been attended with many delays and inconveniencies both to the people and to the public service; and it being expedient that a new disposition should be made to remove those difficulties agreable to the late System for the Quarter Masters department, established by...
Col: David Meade just from logans point informs us that he saw the Enemy land in Force at Westover about 3 or 4 Hours ago, and take up their March towards Richmond. I am with respect Yr. Excellencies Mo Obt RC ( NHi ); addressed.
The Baron Steuben directs that I shall apply to your Excellency for one Hundred and fifty Tents, and two hundred Camp kettles, for the use of the Militia, to be sent to this place immediately. Should your Excellency find it difficult for the State Quarter Masters to dispatch them, those of the Continental Service at Richmond will be ready to lend their Aid. Your Excellency has wrote the Baron,...
I do myself the Honor to inclose you a return from Colo. Gibson for a Number of Articles wanted for the Accommodation of the Militia under his Command. Those are Articles of equipment which these Troops should have been furnished with before they were put into the Feild, which plainly determines that the Continental Staff are not the proper Officers for furnishing them. If your Excellency can...
I did myself the Honor to attend at the Door of the Council Chamber yesterday with a view of Conferring with the Executive on the subject of purchasing the necessary Horses wanted from this State for the southern Army, but as I could not gain Admittance immediately, my business in other respects would not admit of my waiting. I now take the liberty of troubling your Excellency with my thoughts...
Major Claiborne has inclosed me a Copy of your Excellencies Letter on the Subject of the Estimate I left with him to be complied with in Virginia. I find the Executive have estimated the Amount of the Sum which will be requisite to comply with my Claims, and that the Greatness of it fixes the Impossibility even of an Attempt. It is true, in forming the Estimates , I did not consult the...
Your Excellencies letter I had the Honor to receive, and with great pleasure acknowledge the impropriety of mine which gave occasion to it. I find the Error in my Estimate on the Article of grain happened through the Clerk who copied it in my Office. On seeing your State to Genl. Greene I naturally recurred to the original paper in my own possession and there found it stood in these figures...
Upon receiving the Honor of an appointment of Deputy Quarter Master General to the Southern Army from General Greene, dated the fifth of December last, I, immediately, according to the Generals Orders, repaired to Richmond in Virginia to Arrange the business in that State, as the principal support of the service under the present circumstances of the Carolina’s must be drawn therefrom....
I do myself the Honor to inform Yr Excellency that the business of the Merchant’s account & the sales of Hoaksley’s store are brought to a final close. The multiplicity of the Merchant’s accounts rendered the business more tedious than I apprehended. I am now on my way to Richmond, & will from thence transmit all the papers relative to either affair. I left the transmission till I shall arrive...
From Williamsburg the 15th November, I did myself the Honour of informing Your Excellency of the respective Amounts of Mr Ross’s Debt against the United States, for the purchases made of the British Merchants in York, and of the sum resulting from the Sales of Hoaksley (or Robinsons) Store to be set against it. Two Bonds were taken for the latter, one from Braxton & Parker, with a Mr Howey as...
The pressing necessities of the army, the late season of the year, and the difficulty of conveying information through the country, in it’s present situation, have prevented that extensive notice of contracts for the subsistence of the troops, which could be wished. General Greene, very early after the contracts were directed to be made, wrote to every character, whose circumstances and views...
I do myself the honor to hand you herewith, a Contract entered into by Mr. John Banks, for the subsistence of the troops in the service of the United States, in the States of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, for the present year. I am really concerned, that we have been obliged to close this contract, on the execessive high terms agreed to, but the circumstances, under which we had...
Permit me to offer you my most sincere congratulations on your return from the Feild to those pleasing scenes of domestic life which you left with regret. In contemplating the great event which has closed your Military life, be assured that no Fellow Citizen is inspired with more gratitude towards you than myself—but to the Common feelings of my Countrymen, I have to add, as an individual, my...
Your favor of the 4th. Instant was received by the last post. It was fortunate that the same causes of the delay of the Mail, operated also to prevent the sailing of the Packet. With very little trouble I placed your letter in the hands of Mr. Chavalier. The re-election of Colo Lee has afforded me the highest pleasure, as it undoubtedly relieves his feelings, but I am at the same time deeply...
My going to Virginia this winter is indispensible. It is probable, from the state in which events has placed the delegation, that I shall not have an opportunity of going after the session commences without leaving the state unrepresented. Upon these considerations I have determined to seize the present moment and shall set out early in the next week. In the mean time I think it proper to give...
I had the honor to receive your favor of the 16th. of Jan. by Colo. Franks, and thank you sincerely as well for the confidence with which you claim my services, as for your friendly communications . The former you may at all times command: the latter will not only be gratefully received, but repaid as far as my attempts to do so can go. The letters to your freinds were immediately forwarded...
I did myself the honor to address you by favor of Mr. Payne, in answer to yours of the 16th. January. The proposed scheme of a convention has taken more general effect, and promises more solid advantages than was at first hoped for. All the States have elected representatives except Rhode Island, whose apostasy from every moral, as well as political, obligation, has placed her perfectly...
I am favoured with yours of the 10th. Instant and thank you for it. Be good enough to pay Major George Turner, if he is still in the City, £4.5.6 Pensylvania Currency, and, at your leisure, send me the balance of the 100 dollars by some freind who may be coming here. It will, however, be unnecessary for you to put yourself to the least inconvenience to do so. Nothing yet of the remittance from...
I was favoured with yours inclosing a letter for Mr. Jefferson, which I delivered, agreably to your request, to Chevalier Jones—his business with Congress is not finished, and therefore he has not gone with the packet, which sailed this morning. No passenger was going whose personal delivery of the letter could be relied upon, and it seems the Capt. could not take it, otherwise than in the...
I am favored with yours of the 3d. & 8th. Instt. The whole delegation have received letters from Mr. Anderson similar to that which he wrote you. I beleive Mr. Maurey has been equally extensive in his applications. I will mention to our Colleagues your suggestion of giving the names and wishes of those Gentlemen to Mr. Jay. I return you Mr. Fitch’s letter with a note of the Secretary upon it,...
The Gentlemen who have arrived from the Convention inform us that you are on the way to join us—least, however, you may, under a supposition that the State of the delegation is such as to admit of your absence, indulge yourself in leisurely movements, after the fatiguing time you have had, I take this precaution to apprise you that the same schism which unfortunately happened in our State in...
New York, 23 Oct. 1787. Introduces Mr. Jarvis, a “Gentleman of New England” who brings this letter and a copy of the proposed plan of government; refers TJ to Jarvis for news on that subject. Is sending a full account of the convention in another letter of this day which is being carried by “the Chevalier Jones” who intended sailing on the packet but changed his passage to another ship because...
I have been honoured with your favor of the 4th. of August. Inclosed you will receive a Copy of the report of our late federal Convention, which presents, not amendments to the old Confederation, but an entire new Constitution. This work is short of the ideas I had the honor to communicate to you in June, in no other instance than an absolute negative upon the State laws. When the report was...
Mr. Madison and myself have done ourselves the honor to write you very fully as late as the 23d. Ult., but as the Chevalier Jones is but now about to sail in a Merchant Man for Holland, from whence he means to go directly to Paris, I just use this additional opportunity to inclose you the papers from the period of our former letters to this date. They contain sundry peices upon the subject of...
I arrived here on Wednesday night last, and have as yet had but little opportunity to sound the people in any part of the Country upon the constitution. The leaders of the opposition appear generally to be preparing for a decent Submission—the language amongst them is, that amendments must be tried if there should, at the setting of the convention, be a prospect of carrying them down in a...
Since my last from Richmond I have made a circuit, through Cumberland, Powhatan & Chesterfield, and taking Petersburg in my way arrived here last ev’ning. The state of the ice is such as renders the passage of the River unsafe. A Canoe with difficulty makes its way through the Falls and by that means my letters from the post Office have today got to me. Amongst them I am favoured with yours of...
Having an opportunity by Mr. Burnley I embrace it to acknowledge the Rect. of your favor of the 3d. Ult. from N. York, and also to congratulate you upon the success which attended your efforts to turn the Sinners of Orange from their wicked ways. The Rage in Powhatan was, a few days before the election, as high as where, but by the day of trial, the Town was so changed that Mr. Turpin who had...
I have the pleasure to forward herewith two packets which came by the last French Packet. The business of the constitution as referred to the Town meetings of Rhode Island, is over without producing any effect. Three of the Towns were decidedly for calling on the Legislature to appoint a convention according to the mode prescribed, and this it seems from freindly views to the measure. The...
I was but a few days ago honoured with your favor of the 21. December. Having been absent on a trip to Virginia ever since the 1st. of Jany. I was alike cut off from it, and an opportunity of writing you. Massachusetts, Jersey, Pensylvania, Deleware, Connecticut and Georgia, have adopted the Constitution. New Hampshire has been in convention upon it, but finding that a Majority had assembled...
Mr. Barlow of Connecticut will have the Honor to call on you with this letter. I have not the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with him but his Literary Talents have considerably distinguished him as a poetical as well as prose writer, and he is introduced to me as a Gentleman deserving your countenance. Permit me to recommend him to your attention and civilities. He conducts to the Marquis...
My particular Friend Master George Washington Greene will have the Honor to deliver you this letter. Your acquaintance with his illustrious Father renders it unnecessary for me to solicit for him your attention and Countenance. He is sent to France at the age of about 12 years to be educated under the the direction of the Marquis De La Fayette. I have the Honor to be Dr. Sir Yr. Sincere Friend...
I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your several favors from Orange & am much obliged to you for them. Mr. Brown informs me that he has sent you full statements of the Foreign & domestic debts —should you find any additional papers useful, be good enough to inform me, and they shall be immediately forwarded. I can however now add to what you have received, some intelligence upon...
The inclosed papers contain some of the debates of the Convention of South Carolina, and a vote of a vast majority, which shews the dispositions of that Body upon the Constitution. These papers will be of use to you, and therefore I take this the last moment that Offers before the departure of the post to forward them. I am my dr sir yrs. sincerely RC ( DLC ). Mathematical calculations are...
I had the pleasure to inclose you by the last post the British Act of Parliament upon the subject of our Trade. You will now receive in one of the papers inclosed an ordinance of the Province of Quebec, for regulating the inland Commerce of that Province with the Neighbouring States, or in other words the U. S. The intention doubtless is, that these two Acts, shall co-operate to give that...
I had the honor to write you by the last packet by Mr. Barlow and Master G. W. Greene, since which South Carolina has acceded to the new Constitution by a great Majority. The inclosed papers contain the act, and some of the debates of the convention. Virginia is now sitting, having met last Monday, but we have not yet received any intelligence as to the probable turn the business will take...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 6th. of June—it gives great satisfaction not only to myself, but all the Freinds of Federalism to whom I have had an opportunity to commun[i]cate its contents. You very prudently hazard no decided opinions as to the event, but it appears to me that we may calculate with certainty upon a considerable Majority from the facts you communicate. It is...
I was honoured with your favor of the 13th. Instant. I hope the Kentucky Members must have seen that all the objections which have been brought forward by the Antifederalists, upon the ground of the Mississippi are fallacious. Mr. Brown, our Colleague from that Country, is fully convinced of this, and has written to that purpose, to some of the Gentlemen who are attending in convention. I...
Having but a few Minutes notice of this opportunity by Mr. Tillier I can make but little more use of it, than to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 27th. of May, and to send you the second Vol. of the Federalist. The first, I hope, you have received before this.—Virginia and New York have both adopted the Constitution, as you will be more particularly informed by Mr. Madison and Mr....
Having travelled leisurely I arrived here last ev’ning and shall proceed tomorrow morning for Richmond. I left Mount Vernon on friday: during my stay there I had much conversation with the General upon the probable politics of the Assembly with respect to the Constitution. He is fully persuaded that anti-federalism will be the actuating principle, and that great circumspection is necessary to...
Yesterday we had a full House. I am apprehensive from the complection of the Body that my predictions in my former letter, as to the dispositions of a Majority of the Members, will be verified—nothing of any kind has however yet been proposed, and therefore I am enabled to speak only from conjecture as drawn from a veiw of Characters. I am persuaded that an attempt will seriously be made for...
My Election has to day been decided upon as invalid, and I am to undergo another, which will probably keep me from the House ten or twelve days—such indeed is the malevolence of certain Anti’s, that I have reason to suspect that some now here, and not belonging to my County, will endeavour to inspire the people with dispositions against me. The case was decided Yesterday in the Committee of...