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    • Carrington, Edward
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Carrington, Edward" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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Being cut off from the occurrences in the Assembly I have nothing to write you upon, but the prospect as to my reelection. The Apostacy of one of our Delegates in the Convention, and the wavering conduct of the other, have re-animated the Spirit of Anti-federalism in the County to such a degree that much work is to be done before my object will be secured —the issue of the ten days for which...
§ From Edward Carrington. 25 November 1805, Canton. “I have the honor to inclose you, a Duplicate of the Deposition of John Gardnier, first Officer of the Ship New Jersey of Philadelphia, stating the outrage committed onboard that Ship, by the Officers of His Britanic Majesty’s Brig, Harier, commanded by Captain Ratsey, and Duplicates of two Letters, address’d to Captain Ratsey on the subject...
I am just favored with yours of the 2d. Ult: also with that covering the report of the Attorney Genl. Accept my thanks for both. The subject of an Excise did sometime ago excite much apprehension here owing to its being contemplated, and industriously represented by some, with all the horrible circumstances said to attend that of England: much conversation has been held upon it through the...
My going to Virginia this winter is indispensible. It is probable, from the state in which events has placed the delegation, that I shall not have an opportunity of going after the session commences without leaving the state unrepresented. Upon these considerations I have determined to seize the present moment and shall set out early in the next week. In the mean time I think it proper to give...
I have seen the decision of the House of R. upon the Quaker Memorial, nearly I suppose as the Committee reported. From the lengthy debates however and the Matter of these debates, I had been led to suppose it possible at least that the report was a different one asserting something like a power in Congress to meddle with emancipation. The very circumstance of such a subject being taken up in...
It was my intention to have committed to Mr. Giles the successor of Colo. Bland for the district in which I reside, a letter of introduction to you, but his recovering from a spell of Sickness and setting out for Phila. earlier than I expected prevented my doing so. You must before this have formed some acquaintance with him yet I cannot forbear to recommend him as my valuable Freind to your...
The Election for Senators came on yesterday and terminated as I gave you some reason to apprehend in my last—the Ballots were as follow: for R. H. Lee 98, for Wm. Grayson 86, for Jas. Madison 77 the whole number of Voters was 162, 62 whereof were given singly to you, of those Cast away Mr. H. got 26, and the remainder were distributed to many others. I am confident that two thirds of the...
The Gentlemen who have arrived from the Convention inform us that you are on the way to join us—least, however, you may, under a supposition that the State of the delegation is such as to admit of your absence, indulge yourself in leisurely movements, after the fatiguing time you have had, I take this precaution to apprise you that the same schism which unfortunately happened in our State in...
With great pleasure I received your favor of the 20th. Ult, but being distant from Town it did not reach me until about two days ago—the bad weather and other circumstances prevented my being in Richmond at the time of the meeting of the Electors—you have doubtless learned e’er this, that it was not my duty to be there—the antifederalism of my district would have kept out any person whatever...
I arrived here on Wednesday night last, and have as yet had but little opportunity to sound the people in any part of the Country upon the constitution. The leaders of the opposition appear generally to be preparing for a decent Submission—the language amongst them is, that amendments must be tried if there should, at the setting of the convention, be a prospect of carrying them down in a...