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18 April 1809, Kentucky. Seeks the appointment as governor of the Illinois Territory, since “Mr. Boyle has declined accepting the office.” Says he is physically fit and his “mental faculties but little impaired.” The reason for “this abrupt overture” is that “the Illinois is an exposed frontier in the event of War” and a delay in appointing an executive “might be injurious to the public...
There are yet alive a few of the old Whigs in Kentucky, Tennessee, and the Western parts of Virginia. It would but faintly express their feelings, to say they were pleased with the event of the late Election of President of the United States. It is an all important triumph at this crisis of American affairs. When a People are so well united in political sentiments, there are no danger but they...
Having lately been a tour in Tennessee and Kentucky, I have information of The predominant sentiment of The respectable Citizens of Those States relating to The embargo. Most are steady to meet the deprivations, for the want of foreign luxuries, and even necessaries, but it was frequently remarked: "Why did not Congress embargo the Mony, as well as the Ships? The sending off that necessary...
About ten years ago I received from your hands a letter that might then be termed admonitory & prophetic. Now seems to be the time to lessen British influence so as to render American independence secure & permanent. “ British subjects , and American trading on English capitals ,” have rendered a large proportion of our fellow Citizens Tenants at Will; or mere peasants; a short War will revive...
My last, I believe, was dated in Agusta. Since I have returned to the Western Counties and have observed the effect of the hostile attack on our Atlantic Coast. It is a sublime spectacle to hear the people themselves proclaim a cause of War; and what is singular, the aggression by Humphries, seem not to be so sensibly felt, as the fact, that several thousand American Citizens, are withheld...
Among the schemes, I have heard spoken of, in order to counteract, the hostile disposition of the British government; is to set on foot, an expedition immediatly, against Canada, altogether by an Army of Militia. The main body to proceed by way of Lake Champlain, and possess themselves of Montreal, and menace Quebec. Another Corps proceed by way of Oswego, and take possession of all the...
In a late publication I have read with delight the following Sentiment of the President of the United States. “Sensible as we are of the superior advantages of civil life, of the nourishment which industry provides for the body, and Science for the mind and morals, it is our duty to associate our Indian neighbours in these blessings, and to teach them to become fit members of organized...
Since the acquisition of the Country West of the Missisippi I have often indulged myself in contemplations of the future greatness of the United States, different from any conceptions I had of the subject in former years. The thing is new in the annals of the World. The great matter now is, to make the wonderful event, a blessing to the human race. With this impression on my mind, I most...
I take the liberty to introduce to your notice, a Mr. Hargrove of the City of Baltimore, lately known as the Editor of a publication entitled the Temple of Truth . He is lately from misfortunes, become rathe⟨r⟩ straitned in his circumstances, and woul⟨d⟩ now be glad of accepting some public employment in the City he lives, that may be in the gift of the President or the heads of some of the...
It is difficult to remain silent amidst the general exultation on the Election of the present Chief Magistrate of the Union; I mean the joy is general among the Farmers and Labourers of all Classes. Some Merchants and the monied interest with the Bigots and fanatics in religious matters, may have their fears. But the old Tories, and new Gallants of the Whore of England can never be won, even...
Of all your old Friends, none can more sincerely rejoice than I, on your elevation to preside in the Councils of the American People. Not so much from personal feelings, or a local attachment; but from a confidence, that you will restore the administration of their government, to the original principles of the Revolution: to the dignity of the Rights of Man. Minute Philosophers, and...
Nothing can be more consolatory to the sober and reflecting past of the American People, than the peculiar marks of divine favour, that has blest your administration of the government of the United States. The present calamitous War in Europe was begun in the time of the administration of your renowned predecessor: He had the wisdom, amidst many alurements of false glory, to embrace an...
You have spoken, and your Words ought to be heard as the voice of a Father throughout the United States. Thinking in this manner and feeling how incumbent it is upon every person, of every description, to contribute at all times, to his Countrys welfare and especially in a moment like the present, when every thing we hold dear and sacred, is so seriously threatned. Happening to be the senior...
Your very friendly letter of September last aroused my watchfulness, and induced a recurrence to first principles and first practices I have now more than a suspicion that a Counter revolution is aimed at.—A judicious person lately said “that a certain Foreign Minister had a more regular intelligence by means of the post-offices than the President or Vice-President of the United States.”—I...
I take the liberty to send you some political items received from Correspondents that may amuse you in a leisure moment. They may only be the effusions of the writers on hearing of so important an event . May not all our fears of a war with France now evanish. Let republicans in America also take an erect attitude. Let them loudly proclaim their principles, and unite their voices with their...
You have spoken, and you have spoke it with dignity and truth.—That the rising generation of Americans, the most promising and perhaps the most important Youth, which the human species can boast, educated in the principles of religion and morality, and having before them the examples of the wise and good of all nations, cannot fail to answer the high expectations, which the World has formed of...
Your favour of the first instant came safe to hand, by last Post. I have read it over and again, and will treasure up the ideas. We have but little of the party spirit in the Western Country when compared with the great Towns, but we have seen and felt too much. A jealousy must be awakened, and a resistance to foreign influence formed, or we may ere long repent our torpid state as a People. We...
Peace being happily restored on the Western Frontier, I had form’d the design of living in quiet, the remainder of my days, that is to decline writing, or almost thinking, of politics. But again we see our Country verging to an eventful crisis. I am fill’d with anxiety respecting her liberty, and independence, lest they are lost, and with them the happiness of so many Millions of the human...
It would be doing violence to my feelings, did I omit the present opportunity to express at least some sentiments of affection some effusions of gratitude for your many and important services to the United States in general, but more especially for the share of attention you have paid to the safety and prosperity of the Western Country, and that not by slight and temporary measures but by the...
Bearing in mind your polite invitation that you would consider it as a mark of personal attention to continue my communications to the Executive of the United States on subjects relating to the Western Country. The proceedings of the Convention lately met at Knoxville will no doubt reach you in a short time.—And it will be found of moment to the interests of the Union that Congress take...
Allow me to give you the trouble to deliver the inclosed to the President of the U. States and I confide in you to give him such an explanation as may be necessary. The purport of the communication is that I have offered my services with a Corps of Voluntiers to aid in taking possession of the Western Posts next Summer. I know Regulars are usually prefer’d for such service, but why not...
The great figure our Allies the French Nation are like to make in Europe, ought to arouse the patriots of the United States, to every exertion. That altho we cannot keep pace with our Gallic friends, in military renown, yet we may acquire power and stability, by the mild arts of peace. That She in order to establish her Republic, necessarily lessened the number of the human race. Be it our...
If the sentiments of a Society of Whigs, who acted an uniform part in favour of the American Revolution, can be of any use to you, at this singular crisis of political events: I will with pleasure occasionally transmit them. They Say. 1. That the death of Louis of France, ought not to be a cause, of invasion, of that Country, from other nations, much more, it ought not to be ground of quarrel,...
Letter not found: from Arthur Campbell, 1 Jan. 1793. Tobias Lear wrote Henry Knox on 30 Jan. that he had “the honor to transmit . . . a letter from Arthur Campbell to the President, which was brought here this morning.” The entry for 30 Jan. 1793 in GW’s executive journal recorded the receipt of a letter “from Arthur Campbell, dated Washington Jany. 1st. 1793” ( JPP, Dorothy Twohig, ed. The...
An unexpected and important event has taken place, the late agression of the Creek and Cherokee Indians. Notwithstanding all that has happened, I cannot subscribe to the Plan, of immediately dispossessing them of their Country, and making sale of their lands. This may accord with the views of Georgia Purchasers; and their friends, but promises but little towards restoring peace, and a future...
By different communications particularly a letter from one of the Kentucky Delegates of which an extract is inclosed I am informed that the unfriendly Southren Indians have notice of the ammunition intended for the Chickasaws and are preparing a force to try to take it. Piamingo when he set out from Holstein for the Chickasaws Towns, assured us, he would if possible, be back by the first of...
The communications I formerly had the honor to transmit to your Excellency respecting the South-western parts of the United States, now appear to have more weight, than was then foreseen. Alexr McGillivray at times menacing the Southern States; at others soothing them with the appearance of a Treaty. At this time actively engaged in composing some differences, and forming a league among the...
Although I am not honored with a personal acquaintance; yet I can count myself among the number of your early and uniform admirers, and who can now rejoice in seeing the affairs of my Country administered successfully by your hand in preference to any other. I was among the first that embraced the principles of the American revolution, and was not merely an inactive wellwisher; what was then...
Being neither acquainted with your Secretary at War, nor Doctor White the Superintendant for the Southren Department, I have taken the liberty to request your notice to the affairs of the Southren Indians which are now in such a state, that the Spaniards on one hand and other improper intruders on the other, may excite them all to become our enemies; or at best useless friends, whereas a...
As few things in this life can go nearer my heart, than danger to the American Union. For some days past I have revolved in my mind the late intelligence from a Member of Congress, and some information, by another hand. I have also reflected on intimations I had from a friend in Ireland, which I think I give you a hint of last year: at times I conclude it the best policy that our leaders...