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Archer carried my mare down to M r Strange’s to-day, and will get to Bremo to-night on his way home. I have taken the liberty to desire M r Strange whom I saw yesterday to send the mare over to Bremo when he thinks it will be proper to do so , and I will send down for her as soon as you will be good enough to inform me of it, when I hope you will do when she gets to Bremo. I believe M r...
I reached this late last evening & fell over one of the banks and got much injured in several parts of my frame, insomuch that I can scarcely write. I have just seen my brother, who has received a reply from M r Wirt, from which it appears conclusively that he would not accept the law chair. M r Lomax therefore is the Professor, & the system will remain as you desired. Privately owned.
I have got thus far on my way home & to the meeting of the Visitors, with the further view of returning afterwards on business to the lower country, & of coming up again with my family early in May. Events crouded so rapidly in the latter part of the session as to deprive me of the power of writing you an account of our proceedings on the subject of the College Bill. I will now give you a...
On the next page you will find the vote of the Senate on the passage of your bill. Of the four senators who voted against it, two were carried off by their aversion to Lotteries. The Bill was committed at 12. I asked leave for the committee to sit during the session of the house. We reported at 1— & passed the Bill instanter. If the House of Delegates had not adjourned on account of the death...
The publication of the Extract from your last letter to me was made with the approbation of Judge Carr and I hope will not be disagreeable to you, as I am sure it will produce a very good effect. The Lottery Bill was not taken up to-day. It has gained ground for some days past, & I have no doubt will pass, but not without a large minority. We have a wayward house to deal with, but I hope you...
Your favor of 7 th inst has this moment been received. I was already sitting down to add to my last letter. I am distressed to inform you that leave was given on yesterday to bring in your bill by a majority of only 4. I was out among my friends last evening, and I learn from them that there is no doubt of its passage, but that the majority will be considerably less then as lately expected. I...
Your favor of 4th ins t has arrived, and has been read with the greatest interest by myself & the friends to whom I have shewn it. M r Garland’s scheme of 24 Colleges in my view is pregnant with mischief. The only way to defeat it, is to present to the house a better plan in lieu of it. My mind has been on the wing for some days, and a view of this most important subject has occurred to me,...
Your intended application to the Legislature has excited much discussion in private circles in Richmond. Your Grandson will doubtless give you a full account of passing occurrences. A second conference was held at M r Baker’s last evening, at which were four of the Judges of the Court of Appeals, & several members of the Legislature. Finding considerable opposition in some of your political...
Your circular to M r Johnson, M r Loyall & myself relative to the appointment of a successor to M r Gilmer, and your favor of 20th inst by your Grandson respecting the sale of your property, have both come safely to hand & both commanded much of my attention. M r Johnson was requested to write a reply in conformity to the results of a conference between himself, M r Loyall, Gen l Cocke, &...
Your circular, on the subject of the law professor has been received, and we have had a meeting to consider what ought to be done. The continued ill health of M r Gilmer is very much to be lamented, and we deeply deplore the prospect of his loss, in the University and his country— We are very sensible of the importance of filling the vacant chair, as soon as possible, but think that a meeting...