You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Butler, Pierce

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 6

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Butler, Pierce"
Results 1-40 of 40 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
On my return to Town last night I found on my Desk the inclosed letter, Covered by a Note from Mr Cutting to me—As I shall not Sail for New York for some days I take the first opportunity of forwarding it to You— I have the honor to be / sir / Yr Excellencys Most Obedt. Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. Butler returns His thanks to the V President for His Defence of the American Constitutions—Mr. B. had by him the 2d. and 3d. Vols., but in the too frequent moving, had lost the 1st. He wished to have the Whole Complete, to form a Valuable part of His Library; and to put into the hand of His Son MHi : Adams Papers.
I had the honor on my arrival in this City the 22d. Inst, to receive Your letter, Covering a desire of a Number of Gentlemen of Senate. The great respect I bear these Gentlemen woud induce a prompt compliance with their requisition, if my state of health, and the inclement season woud Admit of my traveling to Philadelphia—I observe by the Public Print’s that there is a Quorum—I can not then be...
I feel very sensibly the impropriety of Your Address to me in Senate yesterday. As it was a very indellicate departure from the line of Your Official duty, I did expect that You woud, while in the Chair, have made at least the same Apology You did out of it. Namely, that You meant me no offence. The strong desire I have of promoting and preserving harmony in that branch of the Legislature...
However inconsistant it may appear I am under a necessity of recalling what I wrote on the subject of General Huger. Judge Burke has Calld on me to Say that on reflection He is of opinion that the Sallery woud be no object to General Huger and therefore woud not wish to name Him. I write in a Debate. You will Excuse the inaccuracy. I am   Dear sir   sincerely Yrs. Mr Coxe’s affair is settled...
I come, said Arius Antonius to the Emperor Nerva, with others, to Congrat[ulate] not Your good fortune, but that of the Roman Empire. — Not in the habit of aiming at a Correspondence with any person in an elevated situation; as You are at present; yet I am prompted by a wish to see Your Administration easy and honorable to Yourself; and still more, by Attachment to the honor and interests of...
The inclosed letter must plead my apology for troubling you—I know Mr. Fitzpatrick to be a good, and prudent Man, who may be made useful in a Young Country—He is possessed of good property— I have the honor to be with great Consideration Yr Most Obedt RC ( DNA : RG 59, LAR ); endorsed by TJ as received 3 June and “Fitzpatrick Thos. to office in Missipi” and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure not...
The inclosed letter was put into my hand to deliver in person , which I intended doing; but learning that an application wou’d be made to You by a second person for the same post; sooner than I may reach the Federal City, I have preferd sending by Post— I have been so unsuccessful in two or three recommendations I offerd to Yourself and the Secretay of State, that I shall limit myself on the...
A Committee of Senate to whom the petition of Charles Colvill was refered; together with sundry papers on the subject of a Treaty with the Alegerines, and the redemption of the American Citizens in Captivity at Algiers, have directed me to ask You to Draft a Bill, Authorising the President of the United states, by and with the advice and Consent of senate, to appoint a proper person to treat...
I am solicited by Mrs Mead, a realy amiable, good Lady, to bring to Your view, the only Son She has left, Mr Richard Meade, whose character is unexceptionably good—I will in as few words as possible state to You his Situation—By prudence and industry he acquired a considerable property in the West Indies, with which he returnd to his own Country to alleviate the sufferings of his Parents—Under...
I am just now favourd with Your letter of the 26th of August—Whatever removal I might recommend in So. Carolina can never have in view the strengthening of any personal Interest; yet If I was guided by such considerations the encrease of personal Interest woud be used only in support of the present State of things as regards the General Governmt. The truth is I have no personal object in So....
It is said here that you purpose to remove the Naval Agent or Purveyor of this City. Should the report be correct I recommend to you Doctor James Mease to succeed the Naval Agent. I do believe that Doctor Mease is equal to discharge the duties of the office. If any Security is required he can give it. I have the honor to be with great consideration Dear Sir yr. Most Obedt. Servt. FC in Lb (...
It will not be amiss for You to read the inclosed, which I recd yesterday. please to destroy it when read—It was not very prudent, nor very dignified in Mr. P. to assail You through another person. If he felt true independence of mind he woud unreservedly have stated to You any measure that he consider’d adviseable to be adopted in the State he represented. It might be well for himself if he...
Permitt me to ask You to run Your Eye over the enclosed; and to tell me if the Post mention’d therein is likely to be Establishd. Tho’ the present are not the times for me, or a person of my political sentiments, to be under personal Obligations, Yet it is a duty I owe to the State I represent not to let the Applications of any of it’s Citizens sink with me. I shall make them known, whenever...
I trouble You with the inclosed letter from Mr. Dominick Hall, a Gentleman of the Bar in So. Carolina. I know very little of him; but under existing Circumstances I dont know that You can do better. He is a steady Republican. Pray has anything been done for poor Freneau? I feel solicitous to see him out of the reach of want. I am persuaded You have not less friendly feelings towards him. It is...
I recd. the favour of Your letter a few days before my departure from Charleston. The person in question I find proved unworthy of the introduction, and of Your acquaintance. He begd hard for the letter. I at first declined giving it; He renewd his solicitation: I thought it might be the means of keeping Him in the right path; under this consideration I took a freedom that I have now to...
Mr. Harper, a Delligate from this State, desirous of the honor of Your acquaintance, so very earnestly entreated me to give Him a letter to You that I coud not parry it. You will receive at his hand a few lines from me. If it is the means of keeping Him right, it may, in a degree, Apologise for the liberty I took. It is necessary however, that I shoud frankly give to You my opinion of Him. My...
I am so much indisposed that I am not well able to write. Inclosed You have a few more Articles. I think the Treaty will pass. I will write You the result. Mr. K has moved to Advise the Presidt. to ratify all but the 12th. Article on which further Negociation is to be recommended. I remain with great Esteem Dear Sir Yr. Obedt. Servt RC ( ScU ); enclosure ( DLC ). Addressee not indicated....
I will thank you to forward the letter that you have been troubled with for me, to the Bowling Green, to the care of Col Hooms. I take the freedom of bringing to Your recol⟨lect⟩ion, once more, Freneau, who both you and myself know was sacrificed to the uncontrould pride of Others. I have not seen him for years neither has he ever applied to me, but I have long had him in remembrance his...
It is with reluctance I again intrude on You. By a letter I this day recd from the Island of Great St Simons in the State of Georgia, I learn that Your kind intention of affording protection to that Island has not been carried into execution —allow me to give you an extract from the letter, by which You may form an opinion—“I will first inform You respecting the Gun-boats and Barges—The kind...
I was this day favourd with Your letter of the 29th. of May Covering a Packet to me from Charleston. I am obliged by Your attention to it. You were not troubled with it by my direction. As it is an application for an Appointment I take leave to inclose it to You: Or rather the two letters—the Cover is from the Atty Genl. of So. Carolina —A Correct, modest Man—the Application is from Mr. Peters...
I have been favourd with two letters from You, the Dates I can not immediately refer to, not having the letters at hand. I shoud have written to You before this day had I been able to take a pen in my hand. I have been constantly indisposed since June. I wish now to write You a long letter, coud I be ascertained of it’s reaching Your hand unopend. Curiosity is so prevalent that I must desist...
Letter not found. Ca. 12 January 1795. Mentioned in Butler to JM, 23 Jan. 1795 . Introduces Robert Goodloe Harper.
Puting the true Construction on this short Epistle I persuade myself You will excuse the freedom I take. It will also claim indulgence on acct. of my indisposition—the Mind and body are too closely Connected not to influence each other. I heard with satisfaction the success of Your general proposition. I congratulate You on it. The Manly manner in which You came forward, at a time when the...
I am solicited by the Citizens of a considerable portion of the Sea Coast of Georgia, to request of you to permit them, at their own expence, to send Lumber to replace the Buildings in the Bahamas, destroy’d by Captain Thompson of the Privateer Midas. I do not feel myself at liberty to decline making known their request—they may be influenced by a two fold consideration—a desire for an...
Letter not found. 26 September 1812, Philadelphia. Offered for sale in the American Art Association Catalogue, Frederick B. McGuire Collection (1917), item 22, where it is described as a one-page letter giving “information regarding John Ryan, a British Spy under sentence of death.”
My letter of last week coverd a small part of the Treaty; I now inclose a few more of the Articles. Yesterday Mr. King, after a labourd Apology for the Conduct of the Envoy, with respect to the 12th. Article, proposed to leave that Article for future Negociation with Britain; hoping that Senate woud Agree to all the other Articles. He was seconded by Mr. Elsworth. For the first time that I...
The Treaty passd Senate, with the inclosed Amendment, on the 24th. You have the remainder of the Articles herewith. My first secretary has been Confined to Her Bed some days. I was therefore obliged to get a new One. Secrecy has been required. I protested I woud not adhere to it. Mr Mason made the same declaration. You may make any use You think proper of the Articles, except Printing them,...
I trouble You with reluctance, knowing how occupied You must be. I coud not promise myself attention from any other head of a Department. I had a letter on Saturday from the Man who has the Superintendance of my Estate; he informs that the Enemy are Committing great depredations near my property; that the formerly well and comfortably settled Island of Great St Simons, which produced so...
I yesterday received letters from the under named Gentlemen requesting me to mention them to You as Candidates for the Office, in the Customs at Charleston, lately occupied by Mr Weyman. I have the honor to be, with great Respect sir, Yr Most Obedt Servant ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , ScU . The letters from Edward Weyman, Jr., John Mayrant, and Joseph Bee to Butler, which do not appear to have been...
Charleston [S.C.J 3 August 1791. Encloses an application for a federal customs appointment from the lieutenant governor of this state and assures GW “that No Gentleman in Carolina can have a stronger Claim to Your Attention, or is better suited for the Station than Mr Holmes; And I am persuaded that His Appointment woud give general satisfaction.” ALS , DLC:GW . The enclosed letter of Lt. Gov....
soon after Your departure I received the inclosed letter from Genoa —it came under Cover of one to me that I send with it—If You shall at any time hereafter think proper to Nominate a Consul at Genoa I believe the person in question as elligible as any foreigner to be got. He is very strongly recommended to me by the first Banker in that City; and by other respectable persons. I beg leave to...
I feel it a duty incumbent on me, to inform You, that there is a defect in the Arrangement made fo⟨r⟩ geting Timber in this State, to build the Frigates with. I do not observe anything wrong in the Overlooker, Mr Morga⟨n⟩ but there is a deficiency some where; And unless it is timely Corrected, the Ships might as well, were it possible, be Built of Bars of Silver as of Live Oak. I have the...
I request Your Excellency’s indulgence for troubling You with the perusal of the enclosed Letters—two of them are of a publick Nature, and Contain much information respecting Indian Affairs in the Southern Country; they merit attention—the third is of a private Nature from Judge Drayton, who I believe is known to You; He is a Man of Abilities, and real information in His profession—I shoud...
I am sensible You are troubled with the perusing of more letters than can be agreeable to You. I have therefore, to Crave your indulgence for intruding the inclos’d on You—It is an Act of Justice that I owe to the Citizens of So. Carolina to Convey to You their requests. ⟨ mutilated ⟩ ⟨h⟩ad ⟨I h⟩ad the honor once before, to Name Mr James Simons to ⟨ mutilated ⟩ ⟨you—⟩ He served during the...
I take leave to trouble your Excellency with the inclosed letter from Mrs Butler to Sir Guy Carleton. It is left open for your perusal—I shall thank you to have it Seal’d: And request the favour of your Excellency to have it forwarded by the first Flagg you send to Sir Guy Carleton. I have the honor to be, with great respect and Esteem, Sir Yr Excellency’s Most Obedient Humble Servant DLC :...
By the death of Mr Edward Blake the Place of Commissioner of the Light House of Charleston becomes vacant—Alow me Sir, to recommend to You Mr James Le Motte, a Gentleman every way worthy of, and qualified for the Station, to Suceed Mr Blake. I have the honor to be with great respect Sir, Yr Most Obedt Servt ALS , DLC:GW . James La Motte, a British merchant who settled in Charleston during the...
[Philadelphia, 3 September 1791]. “I received the inclosed letter while I was at dinner—It is my duty to send it to You.” ALS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. The letter of Isaac Motte, naval officer for the port of Charleston, S.C., to Senator Pierce Butler, dated Boston, 21 Aug. 1791, reads: “I have just heard of the death of my worthy and good friend, Mr Geo: Abbott Hall—There’s a...
My situation as a senator from Carolina obliges me to trouble You with the perusal of the inclosed letters. As they will speak for themselves I will not intrude further on Your time. I have the honor to be with great respect and attachment Sir, Yr Most Obedt Servant ALS , DNA:PCC , item 78. The enclosures have not been identified.
I have the honor to inclose to You a letter that came under Cover to me, and which I have just now rec’d from Mrs Greene. I have the honor to be Yr Excellencys most Obedt Servt ALS , DLC:GW . The endorsement to this letter notes that the enclosure was “a Letter from Mr Jas Seagrove,” possibly Seagrove’s letter to GW of 24 July . Catharine Littlefield Greene ( 1753 1755 –1814), widow of Gen....