Benjamin Franklin Papers
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To Benjamin Franklin from James Bowdoin, 2 January 1771

From James Bowdoin8

ALS: Massachusetts Historical Society

Boston January 2 1771.

Dear Sir

I take this opportunity by my Son to express my own Pleasure, and the general Satisfaction at your appointment as Agent for the House of Representatives. The Council have recommended to their Agent Mr. Bollan to consult and cooperate with you for the best interest of the Province: which as it has distinguished itself in the great cause of American Liberty is now become the Principal Object of ministerial resentment. But it is hoped your Endeavours in concurrence with the other friends of America will dissipate the Cloud that seems ready to discharge upon it. My Son’s health being precarious I have been lately advised to let him try the Effect of a Voyage, which it is apprehended may be beneficial to him. This occasions his going to England sooner than I intended. Permit me to recommend him to your Friendship, as I also do his Uncle Mr. Stewart, who does me the favor to take him under his Care.9 Your Advice to him, particularly with regard to his Conduct, and the means of improvement I shall esteem a singular favor. I am with the greatest regard Dear Sir Your most Obedient and very humble Servant

James Bowdoin.

[In the margin:] My Son will deliver you a Pamphlet containing Proceedings of the Council,1 which you already have had in manuscript.

Dr. Benjn. Franklin

[Note numbering follows the Franklin Papers source.]

8For a biographical note on BF’s old acquaintance see above, IV, 69 n.

9James Bowdoin, Jr. (1752–1811), his father’s only son, was eighteen at the time; his health remained precarious throughout his life. He studied at Oxford, traveled in Europe, and returned home after the outbreak of the Revolution. DAB. His maternal uncle, Duncan Stewart (d. 1793), was customs collector at New London; he subsequently became a Loyalist and moved to England. Sabine, Loyalists, II, 331.

1The furor in the Council over Andrew Oliver, for which see above, XVII, 283 n.

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