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Letter not found: from Henry Bouquet, 6 July 1758. On 10 July GW wrote to Francis Fauquier : “A Letter from Colo. Bouquet of the 6th . . . I have just receivd.” GW then quotes two paragraphs from the missing letter from Bouquet.
Letter not found: from Henry Bouquet, 20 July 1758. On 21 July GW wrote to Bouquet : “Colo. Byrd has given me your Letter of Yesterday.”
Letter not found: from Henry Bouquet, 19 July 1758. On 19 July, GW wrote Bouquet : “Your obliging favour of this date, I just now had the pleasure of receiving.”
I had last night your favour of the 24th. 308 Beeves were brought here, and as 320 had been Sent from Cumberland 12 must have been lost—They are extremely bad, and I hope we Shall have no more Such Cattle from the Contractors. I expect to day your Convoy wth the Indians I regret extremely the Loss of poor Bullen, which very truly is a great one at this juncture. If there is any Team fit for...
I am directed by the General to inform you that he had receiv’d your Letter, and Sends you 42 falling axes which could not be collected Sooner. The General thinks that Col. Armstrong is not upon the good Road. Therefore desires that you Send Capt. Shelby to blaze the Road before you and bring Col. Armstrong’s Party in it. The distance of his last Encampment being only 16 miles from here, does...
The officer who commands the Escort you Sent wth Mr Hoops having not been near me I did not know till this moment that there was one, and adventured a Letter to you last night by a man going in the night, which I would be very Sorry should be intercepted. The Beeves lost in driving are to be paid by the Crown, upon Certificate that they have been lost; Therefore I beg you will order the...
Major Lewis with the two hundred men under his command arrived here last night. I am extremely obliged to you for this extraordinary dispatch. Their dress should be our pattern in this expedition. The mistake of the 6000 of flour is a great disappointment. I beg you will continue to order provisions for the Maryland troops, as they are to be supplied by the crown. As soon as the communication...
I Send you 20 Pack horses for the use of your Scouting Partys, wth Pork. Your Convoy will I hope arrive Soon, and restore Plenty in your Empty Stores. If the 3 Cherokees Acct could be depended upon, The French must have a Camp concealed near the Fort, as they have certainly received a Reinforcemt I Expect Some Intelligs. from the Several Partys actually out. I had last night a Letter from the...
The Governors in America have no Comand of the Troops even of their own Province as soon as they are joined wth any other of his Majestys Forces, unless they have a Comission from the Commander in Chief for that Purpose. I have commanded the Forces at Philada and at Charles Town, tho’ the Governor was Capt. General in his Province, and was intirely independant from them. Governor Sharpe will...
The only Reason I had to desire you to march wth your Troops to Reas Town was the Scarcity of your Provisions, as it would otherwise not be adviseable to move you, till the General is fully determined upon the different Roads. As I See that you can be Subsisted for a Sufficient time, you will Stay at Cumberland till further orders. All your Waggons must be Sent immediatly back for the other...
The General desires that you will order 150 men to Set out from Loyal Hannon to morrow morning as early as possible, with 100 falling axes, to cut a new Road along the old one upon the West Side of Lawrell Hill which is unpracticable: Capt. Shelby is desired to take the direction of the Said Road. As the little Carpenter will be to morrow at Loyal Hannon The General desires that Seven Guns be...
I had the pleasure of two Letters from you this morning, and as one of them was upon a most important subject, I read it with great attention, as every thing that has been so seriously considered by you deserves my utmost regard, your arguments are clear, and delivered with that openess and candour that becomes a Gentleman and a Soldier, but give me leave my Dear Sir to answer you in the same...
ALS and copy: American Philosophical Society I am sorry that the first Letter I have the Pleasure to write you, must be upon a disagreeable Subject. The Desertion has already reduced your Two Battalions to about 750 Men, and I have too much cause to expect they will lose many more before they reach Fort Loudoun. I can not spare so considerable a Number from the diminutive Force I was to have,...
I forgot to mention in my Letter of yesterday your Second Company of artificers, which I beg you will Send here with their Tools, Tents & Bagage. By the Waggon which brought here the Cloathing for Capt. Field’s Company, I send 12 Tents for the four Compys of your Regt at Cumberland; I think it is the number wanted, but if I was mistaken having not the Return under my hand, Please to let me...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have the mortification to inform you privately that Bradstreet has granted Peace at Presqu’Isle to the Delaware and Shawanese without insisting on the least satisfaction for their Murders and Insults. I flater myself that the General will not ratify Such a Scandalous Treaty; for my part I take no Notice of it, and proceed to the Ohio, fully determined to...
General Forbes having ordered a Communication to be opened from Fort Frederic to Cumberland; I must desire that you will order three Hundert men (Including the Maryland Troops under your Command) to begin to cut on your Side the Said Road already blazed towards Fort Frederic, and to proceed until they meet the 500 men employed to cut from Ft Frederic: They must have Waggons to carry their...
Copy: British Museum There being too few of His Majesty’s Regular Troops in this Department to act offensively against the Enemy, till they are joined by the Thousand Men granted by this Government, I request that you will please to give the necessary orders to compleat, arm, and Cloathe these Troops as soon as possible. The king’s Arms formerly lent to this Province having not been returned,...
I received the favour of your Letters of the 24th & 25th Inst. with the inclosed Papers. The Maryland Troops at Cumberland have received the General’s orders to march to Reas Town, and the Garrison at Fort Frederic is to join them here by Loudoun in Pensilvania where they are to receive Tents. I Shall Supply the 200 actually wth you on their arrival here; Therefore Please to Send them as Soon...
I have your favour of the 28th and am very glad to have it in my Power to relieve you of that long inactivity which you so justly complain of. The Generals orders are that you march with the Virginia Troops actually under your Command, by Braddock’s Road and that you take Post at the Salt Li[c]ke, that Strong natural Encampment described us once by Sr John Our advanced Partys on this Way will...
I received the favour of your two very obliging Letters of the 19th & 21st Instt. I am very glad that your Presence was not absolutely necessary at Winchester, as I Suppose the General will Soon call upon you, he is this day at Fort Littleton, and I expect him here to morrow or Wednesday: I have Sent him the Reports I had from the Road over Lawrell Hill, which appear to be practicable, but...
Carlisle [Pa.] Answer to Col. Washington’s Quaries. 13th June 1758 1. In case his arms, Blankets, and Provisions could not possibly be ready by the 24th Instt he may differ his march for one or two days. 2. What relates Col. Birds Regiment is explained in the orders. 3. No Arms are to be taken from Maryland. I hope the Col. will be able to arm the two Regimts and the Militia Compa: in having...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I return you my thanks for the continuation of your most friendly offices in the thorny affair you have so luckily carried for me. I flater myself you will not doubt that I shall chearfully embrace every opportunity to do you Justice, and convince you of my Sincere affection, having only to lament that it is not in my Power to do it effectualy. The Inclosed...
I detained your Express in Expectation of receiving a Letter from the General which is just come to hand, he Sets out to day, and orders me to go to our advanced Post, where there is Some appearance of an attack, and as Soon as their Intrenchm⟨ts⟩ are raised, and the necessary dispositions made for the Communication I am to return here: It Seems by his Intelligences that the French expects a...
Capt. Possey’s Company is marched upon the Road, and as the Small Pox broke out some days ago in your Regt I have Sent them all wth Col. Stephens over Allegheny Hill: The first Battn of Pensilvania will follow them and we shall have about 1200 Men in the distance of 36 miles. The Road will be cut to morrow night to the foot of the mountain, where different Parties are to join to cut the Gap,...
The Waggons are arrived safe to this Place, and the Detachmt of Light Horse. As it is not impossible (between us) that a Body of Troops under your Command Should march by B——Route, you will Keep at Cumberland a stock of Provisions for one Month when your convoy joins, and the Rest is to be forwarded to Reas Town. As it is highly necessary to keep the Enemy in doubt about our Roads, The General...
I hope this Letter will find you Safely arrived at Fort CumberLand; as Soon as you are Settled in your Camp, I beg you will begin to cut the Waggon Road to open the Communication between us. I have ordered Nichols the Pilot to blaze the Road in going, and to Stay wth you. His Escort may rest one day or two, then come back again. I have wrote to Col. Byrd to engage the Indians to cover you in...
ALS and copy: American Philosophical Society Colonel Bouquet wrote two letters to Franklin on August 22, 1764, in answer to the one Franklin had written him on August 16 (above, pp. 316–19). The first of the two was a direct response to Franklin’s request that Bouquet “would take Occasion in some Letter to me to express your Sentiments of my Conduct” with regard to supporting and promoting the...
Having been out to visit the Roads I received this afternoon your two Letters of yesterday. I am obliged to you for the notice of the Sad Accident happened to your Men. This Warning may prevent more effectually than orders the Carelesness and disobedience of our People. The General recommands me to Send frequent Partys to harrass the Ennemies at home; I have actually four out, besides the...