You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Bondfield, John

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 8

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Bondfield, John"
Results 1-30 of 209 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
A Ship for Philadelphia sailing to morrow gives me the opportunity to transmit you the papers of the Day too interesting not to be acceptable The reigning Spirrit appears determin’d on a change in that part of the Constitution that delagated the Executive Power in an Hereditary Chief, The short space that has Elapst since the existence of his Power has demonstrated the Vice of that...
It is in common practise before an old Servant is dismist to assign to him some mark of disapprobation or to thank him for his past attentive Services, also to discharge the Sums due him, or provide for him a decent retreat. Publick Bodies are not to be supposed to know private chains unless situated in a line to reflect lustre. This Letter being intended as a private personal representation,...
I am this day honor’d with your favor of the 16 September. I am happy to find that the affairs of America are in a state to fix a permanent line of reimbursement, becoming thereby truly independent. Notwithstanding the weight of opossion against the leading members of the National Assembly, the steddy perseverance of the few and the effectual support of the Marquis deLafayette in whose hands...
The great and Urgent wants of this Nation, occation’d by the faileur of the two last Crops of wheat, creates dreadful Alarms, to this add the low State of the finnances, occation’d by the Great Revolution effecting; for the two last six months few have paid the Usual Tax’s, that the Treasury is exhausted, this forces the National Assembly to extraordinary exertions, to avert the ill...
Bordeaux, 22 Sep. 1789 . A small ship from Alexandria arrived the day before consigned to Fenwick, Mason & Co., but Mason informs him he is instructed to “send her back with all diligence and that he proposes her to Sail in Eight days”; hence there is no time for TJ to take her.—“They write from Virginia the Crop of Wheat is very abundant that the Indian Corn promises favorable in which case...
Bordeaux, 8 Sep. 1789 . Since his of 5th he has received TJ’s of 8th. —No vessels there bound for “the middle States except the Packet” that sails 15th.—“You leave france in a troubled sea. They have undertaken a great work renderd difficult by the Jarr of Interets, Opinions and unsettled Measures. The leading Members dont appear to act on United principles. Your Council is become necessary. I...
Bordeaux, 5 Sep. 1789 . New York packet will sail from hence 15th.—“The Crop of wheat has proved very short of our wants. We must have recourse to foreign Supplies. Some Expeditions are forming from hence and orders are sent by owners of ships belonging to this port now in the West Indies to proceed from thence to different states on the Continent to take in their Loadings of wheat or flour,...
A ship sailing in the morning as it interests you to know the state of the Nation. I have the pleasure to advice you that the appearances promises perfect accomplishment of the Revolution. All the Chiefs in opposition are fled. The National assembly proceed, and are advand in the Ground Work of the Constition, the most Liberal that to this has been held out to any Social Body, not Excepting...
Bordeaux, 11 July 1789 . Has received TJ’s of 27th by Cutting.—“I have introduced that Gentleman to Mr. Streickeysen.” The sum owed the latter by South Carolina “will be a bar to impower in a Stranger the means of recovery. The State hath named a Commissioner for receiving the proceeds of Tax’s appropriated to the discharge of their foreign Debt. The Commissioner has already made a...
Bordeaux, 23 May 1789 . Eight vessels have arrived from America within “these few Days”: 3 from Georgia and Carolina with rice, tobacco, and skins; 2 from Virginia with tobacco and flour; and 3 from Maryland with wheat, flour, and tobacco. Wheat and flour much wanted. More cargoes daily expected. Want of shipping will retard them, “but these supplies will serve to prevent appearances too well...
Permit me join in the United voice of America. Accept my sincere Congratulation on the Nomination to the High Office Confer’d on you by the Choice of a free People an Honor superior to any in the gift of Europe I hope in a few days to receive the Journals of the Opening and proceedings of Congress much more interesting than the Mock scheens of present Assembled States General of many of the...
Bordeaux, 2 May 1789 . The ship Le Couteulx , 32 days from Norfolk with 875 hhds. tobacco, brought the enclosed. “She left the Capes the 26 March.” He gave to Short a packet of newspapers addressed to TJ: Short says they “are of old date say 9bre. or Decembre.” They hope for arrivals of wheat and flour from America: “They retard and the wants are Urgent.” American advices say “wheat is very...
Bordeaux, 28 Apr. 1789 . No arrivals since his of [25th.] From public prints up to 4 Mch. the states have chosen representatives for Congress except North Carolina: “General Washington President John Adams Vice. Mr. Jay appears to have had many Voices for Vice. Your State is represented … by J. Page, James Maddison, Saml. Griffin, Andrew Moore, R. H. Lee and Alexr. White.—Great disunion in New...
Bordeaux, 25 Apr. 1789 . Since his of 18th, six vessels have arrived from America: “one from Carolina with Rice, three from Maryland with wheat, flour and Tobacco, Two from Virginia with Tobacco and wheat. They are seasonable arrivals. Having urgent wants great supplies must arrive to supply them. These ships will be dispatcht with all posible diligence in hopes to return back to france with...
I am honor’d with your favor of the 12th. We have at present in this Port the Ships Le Marquis de la fayette Cap. Cain belonging to Philada. a good Ship a good Captain, bound to Philada. The Duc de Penthievre with Tobacco from Norfolk to return so soon as discharged, a Good Ship. The Philadelphia from Baltimore unloading and will be ready in 10 or 15 Days. The Mercury her departure uncertain....
As I intimated to you in my last On application to the Directeur of the Domaine who is orderd to pay the Bounty allowd by Gouverment on flower and wheat Imported from the United States, he Evaded satisfying the demands of the Importers alledging the want of the Certificate from a Civil Magistrate at the Port of Export, I waited on the Director to know what he understood by that Certificate...
There are Cases werein Spite of all Opossion means permiting forces our restrictions. The Number of Unfortunate American Seamen in this City drove to dispair by the want of every Necessary calls for publick assistance. The Number of Shipwrecks that have lately happend has sent great numbers of distrest men to apply for relief. A State of Bankruptcy in Trade is not more horid than the Crys of a...
I have to reply to the Honor of your favor of the 14 Ulto. I made recherches at the Prevoté to find out the two Americans who petitiond your intervention. They are not within the limits of this Jurisdiction. The Season has been most uncommonly severe, since the 24 our River is full of Ice, great Loss’s are sustaind on the Navigation, many ship are Lost and others greatly Damaged. Last night I...
A Shipment I made in August is the cause of your not having receiv’d the two Cases of hautBrion. My Coopers thro inattention Shipt them with a considerable number I then sent off to the Isl of france and which I did not discover of some Days after, too late to have them landed. The Vintage and a Wedding we have had in our family Capivatived me most of this fall In the Country that in truth I...
I receiv’d ⅌ last post a Letter under my Cover from you for the Honble. J. Jay, which I have deliverd to Mrs. Barclay.-Mrs. Barclay with her family arrived in good health on Saturday. They are on their passage to America having left this early this morning. One of the papers you deliverd Mrs. Barclay was the Inclosed paquet that she apprehends was put up thro mistake and has given it me to...
Bordeaux, 9 Aug. 1788. Mrs. Barclay wrote by this day’s post that she would set out by 10th or 15th at furthest, and intended to stop at Blaye . “The Diligence dont pass near that post of some miles,” and he urges TJ to convey his recommendation that she “stop at a Village or small bourg calld St. André de Cubsac near to which we have a Country Seat, and will give instructions for Carriages to...
By the Brig Missoury arrivd yesterday from Philadelphia I received Letters from our friend Mr. Barclay with instructions to facilitate all in my power Mrs. Barclays return to America. I write this Post to Mrs. Barclay advising her the arrival of the above ship and transmit her a remittance to discharge her engagements and defray her Expences to this Post where I shall retain the Vessel and...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 17 Ulto. Under the Guard of the Prevost I found the Men mentioned in the Letter of Le. Cte. de Montmorin. One of them was an Englishman who had no claim to the protection of America, the Other an Irishman but who served part of the Campaign in the American Army and say’s married in Virginia. This man I took out and obtaind a passage on...
Bordeaux, 19 Apr. 1788 . Acknowledges TJ’s letters of 22 Feb. and 3 Mch.; forwarded TJ’s letter to Pichard; hearing nothing from Pichard, wrote him and received the enclosed reply. The “Vins d’hautbrion belonging to Monsr. Le Cte. De fumel” are esteemed as next in quality and a few hogsheads of this of the 1784 vintage are available. Has received “two Cases vin de frontignac from Mons....
I am honord with your favor of the 22 february ulto. inclosing a Letter for President Pichard which I have forwarded to him at Liburn, the residence of our Parliament. The last post brought me a Letter from Mons. Lambert de frontignan advising his having forwarded to my care two Cases of his Wine for Mons. Le Cte. de Moustier at N. York. To avoid troubling Mess. Elie Lefebre at Rouen I address...
Since mine of the 28 nov. I am honor’d with your favors of the 18 and 31 Decr., the first covering a Letter to M. D’Yquem, that estate at present belongs to the Comte de Lur his son in Law to whom I inclosd your Letter, to which you have inclosed his answer. I have receivd from him five Cases of his wine and have shipt them on board the Actif for Rouen. They goe addrest to the care of Mr. Elie...
I receivd in due course your favor of the 13 Instant, the Vin de frontignan for Monsr. le Comte de Moustier shall be carefully forwarded to New York by the first vessel after its arrival here. The American Ships to this have not been subjected to report the contents of their Cargoes inwards nor to take out specified clearances of their outward Cargoes, that no registres have preserved any...
I have the honor to transmit you the State of Imports of Tobacco from the United States to this Port from 1 January 1786 to 24 Sept 1787, since which are arrived four or five Vessels principally for account of the Contractors. I have divided the State in two parts the one containing the Imports on private Account the other from Mr. Morris, on Account of his Contract. We have arrivals that left...
Bordeaux, 12 Oct. 1787. Finds the return made by the farmers-general, enclosed in TJ’s letter of 5 Oct. , accurate; the register of the farmers does not indicate the nationality of the ships in which tobacco was imported so he cannot ascertain how much came in French or American ships, only that “the whole has been brought from America”; the “Tare is taken net the Hogsheds being stript as...
Bordeaux, 10 Oct. 1787 . All workmen in the public dockyards “are taken up and put forward”; 3,000 seamen have been ordered from that place; war appears “not far distant”; many private American ships are in Europe; their seamen will be pressed into service “on one side or other”; few will be “found for the American Navigation.” Has been advised by an inhabitant of Quebec who arrived two days...