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We take the liberty through necessity of troubling you with this anonymous Letter which we send with good intention, for we are the persons who endeavored to communicate to Genl Washington by two special messengers one of whom miscaried in a Vessel he sailed in from New Orleans which was lost on her Voyage; and the other was Mr. J––n who we suppose made his Virbal Report: The substance of...
We take the liberty through necessity of troubling you with this anonymous letter, which we send with good intention; for we are the Persons who endeavoured to communicate to General Washington by two Special Messengers one of whom miscaried in a Vessel he sailed in from New Orleans which was lost on her Voyage. And the other who was Mr S——n who we suppose hath made his Virbal Report: the...
We are a private Committe held at the Natchez on the 13th of June 1797 and beg leave to report as follows. !st That no Attention is or hath been paid by the Spaniards to the Treaty subsisting between America and Spain as they refuse to Evacuate any of the posts included in the Treaty, but contrariwise are repairing Rebuilding and fortifying such Posts. 2d The People of the Natchez do solicit...
You can appreciate the value of facts, without reference to the person from whom they are derivted. Circumstances Not be controulled, render this the only method of communication, consistent with the writer’s view of propriety— Mr. Tracy a member of the Senate, from Connecticut, is intriguing to obtain the appointment now held buy Gov. St. Claire; ‘Tis fitting, Sir, that you should know, that...
It will not be denied that permitting as we did by treaty, one of the belligerent powers to alter at pleasure the destination of our Vessels not loaded with contraband Articles, nor destined for ports either blockaded or besieged, was a departure from the duties that neutrality imposes. In like manner perhaps might be considered the loaning of money to either of the powers engaged in War....
From a desire of seeing every department of the federal Govt filled by respectable characters I am induced to make an observation or two on the pretensions of the persons who I have heard are candidates for the naval office of this port, vacant by the recent death of the late excellent Mr Russell—Mr. Nath. Folsom, & Capt Geo Turner, I have heard are desirous of obtaining it— From enquiry Sir...
It can not have escaped your observation that the Secretary of State has qualities that may be the means of involving this nation in war. He is irascible and resentful. His correspondence is in a Style not conciliating but insulting. His published instructions to Pinkney were not as from a civilised nation, suaviter in modo, they were of the most caustic quality. With the Spanish minister he...
It is generally consdred in this City that you are a party-man; Which is the most Base and Horrid character a man in Your station of Life possibly can possess. Certain it is that every person has some Bad qualities; and in persons that hold s any office of State are certainly and allways sounded by the citizens of the states. Some consider you as (and you are most generally Considerd as) more...
I am desired to inform you that thier at present Laws which give you too great power and cause great discontents amongst the citizens of the United states, There is several thousand of the citzens who are ditirmened to have those Laws repealed or undergo the perils of a civil war; to conquer or die; we have frequent corespondance with those patriots in Northampton whom we are to join as soon...
I have frequently warned Americans against reposing any confidence in the friendship of any European Nation: and have recommended to them to rely for Safety and Justice, only upon God and the Sword.—Many of my friends have thought this Opinion erroneous, and my Jealousies illfounded; but a circumstance has occurred which convinces some that I have not been widely mistaken, and I trust that all...
As people are often last to hear & know, what it concerns them most to know, I take the liberty of enclosing you an article from the Aurora relative to a business which has too much foundation in truth. The love I bear my country induces me to make this communication to you. There are many very powerful reasons why I should not address you, at present , under my legitimate Signature, but the...
The desire, Sir, of making you acquainted with what I deem’d it important you should know, made me take the liberty of making you some time past an epistolary communication under the very appropriate signature of “a friend”. The motive which induced that, urges me to ulterior communications on the same interesting subject. My profound admiration of your conduct as chief magistrate—&...
Your communication in the late Chonacle has capt all your other transactions—not content with plunging the Provinces in a wicked and unjust Rebellion against the mother Country—not content with hagging with the vilest Nation on Earth, when Great Britain offerd every thing that we could wish, yet by the War was in —Not content after you was forgiven by the Best of Kings & all the true friends...
Having got a few seeds from Europe that appear deserving attention, and as some of ‘em may be adapted to a more northern climate than this, I have taken the liberty of sending some of them to Your care—if attending to them will not be convenient for yourself I have no doubt you will put them into the hands of some friend who takes an interest in improving the productions of the country— It is...
a Bostonian who reveres the “Sage of Quincy” takes the liberty of transmitting him this newspaper from Ohio—as possibly it may not reach his retreat He cannot avoid expressing his gratification, that after all the shallow abuse which has been recently poured forth upon the present administration, there is a good feeling in the Western country, correspondent to that which is felt by the high...
This lady was not more elevated by rank, than eminent by her virtues. Of her sex, she was an ornament, not less pure, than it was brilliant. At once the charm and the pride of the domestic circle. Exemplary in the fulfilment of every social and religious obligation; and in the native ease and characteristic dignity, with which they were discharged. Presiding, in her family, as though its cares...
Sonnet. to Miss Brooks by a friend What shall I, maiden, to thee Say, Thou Art, so full of life; so gay; ’Twere Sui, to check thy mirth; By musty l aws, or sermons long; And yet, in spite of Mirth, or Song Thou must, with all the sprightly throng; Descend, to mother Earth. Yet, let not this, your spirits chill; All, must obey dame Nature’s Will; But whilst you still, have Youth; Make choice,...
A DIRGE. Praise to the virtuous dead the Heathen owed, And funeral game, and urn, and chant bestow’d; Praise for the virtuous dead the Christian claims From higher motives, and with holier aims Oh, call’d too soon, how late so e’er thy knell, Our earliest, longest hope, "Hail and Farewell! ” That fiftieth Sun who brought his faithful ray To gild thine own, and Freedom’s fav’rite day, His...
FUNERAL SOLEMNITIES ORDER OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 1st. ANTHEM.—“ Child of Mortality. ” 2d. Select Portions of Scripture. 3d. PRAYER. 4th. ORIGINAL HYMN...... Written to Pleyel’s Dirge . By Herman Mann . LO! Two mighty SUNS have set In conjunction, as they rose, On the Day, when
FUNERAL SYMPHONY. PRAYER. ANTHEM. How are the mighty fallen! They that were great among the Nations, and Rulers of the People.—The People will tell of their wisdom:—The righteous shall be had in everlasting remembrance, as the brightness of the firmament.—Their bodies are buried in peace; but their name liveth evermore. Handel. DISCOURSE. DIRGE. Hark! attendant Seraphs say, Patriot Spirits,...
Transcript: Library Company of Philadelphia Unsigned and undated, these verses have been copied into a Scrap Volume compiled by Pierre Eugène du Simitière. The latest event specifically mentioned is the building of Fort Allen in January 1756 (above, VI, 362–7), and the absence of any direct mention of Franklin’s English mission implies a date earlier than the summer of 1757 and presumably even...
Fort-Dauphin [Saint-Domingue], 1 April 1776 . Offers his services to GW. He says that he served in Germany during the last war as a lieutenant in the Royal Grenadiers and was dismissed three years after the peace. He came to Saint-Domingue to advance himself but has not been able to obtain a company. He does not sign his name for fear that this letter might be intercepted and injure him at the...
4 August 1776 . “My House is forcibly entered & posessed by officers and Soldiers without my Consent, to the number of 60 or 70. . . . From A barrack, my House is now become A mere Hospital Noise & Disturbance day and night, reign in every part—The two Halls below are occupied by the rude hand of Insolence the Doors nailed, & I am at last reduced to such narrow limits that the next...
As I have past your Quarters Several times Lately I saw With Concern A number of Peirsons Great Enemies to Your Excellency (as A general) and their Country Pleas therefore to take Great Care of the Name of Ogden, (Particularly that family) and their Connection Peter McKee &c. Depend on What I write here to be fact I know them Well. Abought 5 Days Ago one Wm Stewart an assistant of these fals...
I should never have presumed to address a letter to your Excellency and least of all an anonymous one, were it not for the delicate and responsible situation in which your power of nominating and appointing to office places you and likewise for the necessity consequent thereupon of your being acquainted with the character and abilities of various candidates. A Collector we are told is shortly...
The first request of General Washington is that he will burn this line after reading it, as it comes from a man who on his own account (unconnected with those who have the strongest ties on him) would not trouble any mortal with the request of a favor: therefore in case your more important duties obliges you to spurn at my intrusion, let it become impossible for any person by my hand writing...
Although my name will not be, to this paper many where you preside know me personally, I have been under your command when you were surrounded with eminent Danger. I lost every thing by the American War, nor, did I ever join the enemies of America in thought, word, or deed. I am banished from my native country like many others; because I cannot pay my debts; If I had the gold which I exchanged...
Beware. Be upon your guard. You have cherished in your Bosom a Serpent, and he is now endeavouring to sting you death. Under the Mark of a Democrat, he thinks he conceals his ambition which is unbounded. His vanity makes him believe that he will certainly be your Successor. But he can not wait with patience untill it shall please God to take you from this world. He wishes to precipitate his...
Your knowledge of the world makes it hardly necessary for me to remind you how difficult it is to dislodge a cunning bad man when he has once got possession of the heart of a great & good one. The strongest evidence of this fact is derived from the history of Princes. Be not offended at my mentioning Tiberius. There is no similitude between your characters. He, a brutal Tyrant. You possessed,...
I know you to be good—and you are great, independent of public opinion—I mean intrinsically great, if you were not possessed of that opinion. But you are possessed of it, and stand higher, beyond all comparison in the estimation of persons of every description than any man. The virtuous part of the community who have for years put everything to hazard to obtain a Government, likely to insure...