Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Anonymous"
Results 1-30 of 161 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Sonnet. to Miss Brooks by a friend What shall I, maiden, to thee Say, Thou Art, so full of life; so gay; ’Twere Sui, to check thy mirth; By musty l aws, or sermons long; And yet, in spite of Mirth, or Song Thou must, with all the sprightly throng; Descend, to mother Earth. Yet, let not this, your spirits chill; All, must obey dame Nature’s Will; But whilst you still, have Youth; Make choice,...
It is generally consdred in this City that you are a party-man; Which is the most Base and Horrid character a man in Your station of Life possibly can possess. Certain it is that every person has some Bad qualities; and in persons that hold s any office of State are certainly and allways sounded by the citizens of the states. Some consider you as (and you are most generally Considerd as) more...
We are a private Committe held at the Natchez on the 13th of June 1797 and beg leave to report as follows. !st That no Attention is or hath been paid by the Spaniards to the Treaty subsisting between America and Spain as they refuse to Evacuate any of the posts included in the Treaty, but contrariwise are repairing Rebuilding and fortifying such Posts. 2d The People of the Natchez do solicit...
a Bostonian who reveres the “Sage of Quincy” takes the liberty of transmitting him this newspaper from Ohio—as possibly it may not reach his retreat He cannot avoid expressing his gratification, that after all the shallow abuse which has been recently poured forth upon the present administration, there is a good feeling in the Western country, correspondent to that which is felt by the high...
Your communication in the late Chonacle has capt all your other transactions—not content with plunging the Provinces in a wicked and unjust Rebellion against the mother Country—not content with hagging with the vilest Nation on Earth, when Great Britain offerd every thing that we could wish, yet by the War was in —Not content after you was forgiven by the Best of Kings & all the true friends...
It will not be denied that permitting as we did by treaty, one of the belligerent powers to alter at pleasure the destination of our Vessels not loaded with contraband Articles, nor destined for ports either blockaded or besieged, was a departure from the duties that neutrality imposes. In like manner perhaps might be considered the loaning of money to either of the powers engaged in War....
The desire, Sir, of making you acquainted with what I deem’d it important you should know, made me take the liberty of making you some time past an epistolary communication under the very appropriate signature of “a friend”. The motive which induced that, urges me to ulterior communications on the same interesting subject. My profound admiration of your conduct as chief magistrate—&...
From a desire of seeing every department of the federal Govt filled by respectable characters I am induced to make an observation or two on the pretensions of the persons who I have heard are candidates for the naval office of this port, vacant by the recent death of the late excellent Mr Russell—Mr. Nath. Folsom, & Capt Geo Turner, I have heard are desirous of obtaining it— From enquiry Sir...
It can not have escaped your observation that the Secretary of State has qualities that may be the means of involving this nation in war. He is irascible and resentful. His correspondence is in a Style not conciliating but insulting. His published instructions to Pinkney were not as from a civilised nation, suaviter in modo, they were of the most caustic quality. With the Spanish minister he...
Having got a few seeds from Europe that appear deserving attention, and as some of ‘em may be adapted to a more northern climate than this, I have taken the liberty of sending some of them to Your care—if attending to them will not be convenient for yourself I have no doubt you will put them into the hands of some friend who takes an interest in improving the productions of the country— It is...
We take the liberty through necessity of troubling you with this anonymous letter, which we send with good intention; for we are the Persons who endeavoured to communicate to General Washington by two Special Messengers one of whom miscaried in a Vessel he sailed in from New Orleans which was lost on her Voyage. And the other who was Mr S——n who we suppose hath made his Virbal Report: the...
I am desired to inform you that thier at present Laws which give you too great power and cause great discontents amongst the citizens of the United states, There is several thousand of the citzens who are ditirmened to have those Laws repealed or undergo the perils of a civil war; to conquer or die; we have frequent corespondance with those patriots in Northampton whom we are to join as soon...
We take the liberty through necessity of troubling you with this anonymous Letter which we send with good intention, for we are the persons who endeavored to communicate to Genl Washington by two special messengers one of whom miscaried in a Vessel he sailed in from New Orleans which was lost on her Voyage; and the other was Mr. J––n who we suppose made his Virbal Report: The substance of...
I have frequently warned Americans against reposing any confidence in the friendship of any European Nation: and have recommended to them to rely for Safety and Justice, only upon God and the Sword.—Many of my friends have thought this Opinion erroneous, and my Jealousies illfounded; but a circumstance has occurred which convinces some that I have not been widely mistaken, and I trust that all...
You can appreciate the value of facts, without reference to the person from whom they are derivted. Circumstances Not be controulled, render this the only method of communication, consistent with the writer’s view of propriety— Mr. Tracy a member of the Senate, from Connecticut, is intriguing to obtain the appointment now held buy Gov. St. Claire; ‘Tis fitting, Sir, that you should know, that...
As people are often last to hear & know, what it concerns them most to know, I take the liberty of enclosing you an article from the Aurora relative to a business which has too much foundation in truth. The love I bear my country induces me to make this communication to you. There are many very powerful reasons why I should not address you, at present , under my legitimate Signature, but the...
Ma belle soeur, madame la Duchesse, vient de me mander que son jardinier attendroit le moment où vous seriez à Chaillot pour vous montrer en detail tout ce qui est dans son jardin. La maîtresse de la maison croit vous faire sa cour en ne paroissant pas. Elle m’assure que toutes les personnes que vous voudrez envoyer chez elle seront reçeues à toutes les heures. Recevez avec bonté les...
The Embargo is violated in the following manner, Ships clear from the Southward for a northern port & go off to the West Indies, The collector at Old York (near Portsmouth) for a certain sum per Barrel & per Hohd. sends on a certificate in due form of the landing of the Goods—about twenty vessels have gone from Old York & its viscinity manag’d in another manner; Bonds to a small amt have been...
“Now the coat was without seam; woven from the top throughout.” St. John. This burnouse is Tunisian manufacture—& is the upper dress of the nobility and men of fortune at audiences and visits—It is probably of finer texture than the “White raiment” alluded to in the text; but undoubtedly of the same mode—Hence the mystery of the spotless raiment without seam . DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Again the Citzens of Delaware are in expectation of the removal of Alen McLane from Office, and the appointment of some Republican to succeed him. If in this expectation they are to be gratified; permit one who neither now is or ever hath been an Applicant, to make known to you in this way the General Wish of real republicans; viz. “That when the Office is taken from one revolutionary Officer,...
without pretensions to the weight of character, that would justify the appearance of my signature, I have attempted to explain to the people their real situation.—Amendments in the constitution of the state, (amounting almost to a radical change) has become absolutely necessary. The Aristocratic few, who rule, need these amendments, as well as the majority who Submit; but a love of power has...
When I reflect on the protection you give to Genl. Wilkinson and the misfortunes of Commo. Barron who is Left alone to Bare the frowns of the Federalist & Tories I am hurt at your Patiality and alltho I have revered you as the man who saved America From Tyrants and Federal opprssion yet I have considered your support of Wilkinson as hurtfull to your futer high character and I was sorry to see...
The period is nearly ariv’d when You hope to reallize the pleasure of a retired life. I have no doubt but You have exerted Your abilaties to promote Your Countries honour & interest, with the purest intentions, but Sir experience has prov’d to us, that all Your well ment measures have not had the desir’d effect. if You wish to be happy in Your retirement You must not leave any obstacle in the...
As the publck has gave you the credit of Drafting the Declaration of Independance, and as you have fill d the greatest office s in the power that the people have to their power give you, which dutis you apear to have Discharg d to their Satisfaction, all this has plac d you on a eminance, that your opinion and good Judgment, or recomendation will go further than any one other Citizeen in the U...
Mr. Thomas Jefferson President of America—Debtor to Miss S. T. an orphan child; four months rent of a Store in Boston due this 29 March 1808—which Store the Tenant has left in consequence of the embargo laid by Mr Jefferson; & the said orphan is deprived of the past income without the least prospect of any future tenant occupying her Store left by her departed parents, & has nothing but the...
The maker of the enclosed Speech, accompanied Lewis & Clark when he was an uneducated boy, over the Rocky Mountains. The sentiments contained in it, are so much like your own, that a person unknown to you, is tempted to forward it to you, and it is without mr L s knowledge. I ought perhaps to add, that he accompanied the party of Pryor with the Mandane Chief up the Missouri afterwards, and...
The numerous, vindictve and malicious Aspersions that have appeared in our public papers to lacerate your Character & reputation—by factious Harpies & party Zealots for the last twenty years have fill’d the breasts of your friends with sorrowfull feelings & vexatious indignation and of none more than the person who now takes the liberty of addressing you— it is a Tax laid on superior Talents &...
With diffidence I attempt to address Mr Jefferson on a subject which nearly interests me—I beg to submit myself to your direction—not doubting your care of me as circumstances renderd me incapable of Judging clearly I wish to rectify any evil that May attend Judge Johnson his reputation or interest from the unfortunate circumstanc which has taken place—and any assertions I may have made or...
Go to Hell you damn’d Buggur —Go to hell— DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
You are the damdest fool that God put life into. God dam you DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.