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A few days since I received your kind letter of Feb ry : 18 th: and its being handed by a Townsman of yours was a circumstance that afforded me additional pleasure. Indeed I always receive more satisfaction when I meet with any of your Neighbors, than from the inhabitants of any other place; and can account for it upon this principle chiefly, that I lived in that town at a period when objects...
Either write upon larger paper, or give an outside cover to your letters, for in the act of opening yours which I have just rec d: I took away with the wafer much of the connection of several sentences; and being interested in every word I felt rather out of humor; However I collected sufficient from the whole cloth to make quite a decent garment. The only circumstance to be regretted is, that...
I have somewhere heard an observation of this kind, “that a person should not be too anxious to return a kindness.” Had I strictly adhered to this injunction, an Answer to your last favor would not so soon have followed; but as you expect shortly to be at Braintree in person, I must either remain in your Debt, or take this opportunity to discharge the obligation. I am happy to find that the...
Influenced by the same principle as when I last wrote, viz. That of discharging a debt before it has accumulated much on the score of interest, I have determined to come to a settlement to the date hereof. You must not however expect the same degree of pure metal as that which produced the obligation; but make many grains of allowance for barrenness of Mint. Even should you be paid in Script...
The kind of silence which we have observed toward each other since I left Massachusetts, is not at all congenial with my feelings or disposition. You had just embarked in a cause in which I feel myself particularly interested; to know the success of the enterprize thus far would give me much satisfaction; the object of this letter is in some measure to draw from the source of information a...
This day week I put a letter into the Post Office for you under cover to my Brother JQA . and this morning I have receiv’d your many dated letter, the last is the 16 th: . I complained in my other letter of our long silence, and am happy our thoughts should so well unite in breaking the charm. I should not have undertaken so suddenly to answer your letter, but for this circumstance. The last...
Those Letters which I was directed to Copy and deliver to M r. Cary for insertion in his “Museum”, were prepared in season for last month; when I took them to Cary, he wished me to explain the occasion upon which they were written. I told him that the Gentleman to whom one of the letters is addressed, (M r. M. Weems), had applied in England for Orders, as an Episcopalian Bishop, but that the...
I received your kind letter of the 6 th: this Evening, and feel happy that you advanced so far on your Journey, without receiving any injury. I was somewhat anxious for your health, but the favorable account you give, has relieved me in a measure from the apprehension. I hope you may enjoy it much more this Summer than the last. The directions left with me respecting M r: Harrison, are...
By one of the Newspapers I had the satisfaction to hear of your arrival at Boston, & have been anxiously enquiring for Letters at the post Office every evening. I wish to hear how you stand the warm weather, and the effect of your Journey. The object of this letter is more immediately for the purpose of requesting a decisive answer to the proposal made by M r. Bache of the House he has just...
I have just taken your letter from the Office and, as Briesler has not according to expectation sailed to day, I will add a few lines to what I have already given him. To hear from Col o and M rs: Smith was an agreeable circumstance, tho’ much unhappiness is occasioned by it, under their peculiar situation. I had heard about a week since of their arrival at Dover, and of their illness—but had...