You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 44

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
Results 1-30 of 730 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
After having so long delayed to answer your very affectionate letter I feel perfectly ashamed of making any excuse as I am consious it is not in my power to make a proper one I must therefore rely upon your known indulgence and in future be more careful—Our jouney from Hamburg was extremely unpleasant the roads were very bad and I was in constant dread of our being overset but fortunately we...
Long since should I have answered my beloved Nancys affectionate letter had I not daily expected to hear that you had changed your name and become a happy Bride I flatter myself however this letter will find you Mrs. Hellen and that my sincere congratulations will be kindly accepted by my Cousin and yourself with earnest and cordial wishes for your future happiness— I believe in some of my...
Although I wrote you a long letter last Week I cannot resist the present opportunity though I confess I have nothing to say that will even be worth your reading I ought perhaps to appologise for my last. upon reflection I see the impropriety of having addressed myself to you on a subject which could only prove unpleasant to you and tend to make you a party in my trouble. I am sincerely grieved...
You cannot concieve Mr. Adams’s disappointment on opening your letter and finding it directed to me I was so agreeably surprized that I absolutely kissed it. Would to heaven we could have you back again. I did not think I should have felt the loss of your society so much but we really are not like the same family as for your brother I never saw him so much affected at anything in my life I...
I write you again my dear Nancy though I am very angry at your not having answered either of the letters which I wrote you by Mr. T. B. A. I when I heared you had removed to Baltimore I flattered myself I should hear from you very often but I am excessively sorry to find myself so much mistaken I will not make any reproaches because I do not wish you to write merely because I ask you I am...
As I have been rather unwell lately from the fatigue of my journey I have neglected my journal so much I scarcely know how to continue it however as my journey is nearly at an end I must at least give some account of the latter part of it though as usual my beloved father I am fearful you will find it exceedingly tedious— I believe my last letter was dated at Breslau though my journal had only...
Death in the Dance. A reminiscence The new year had opened without a cloud to obscure the azure of heaven and all hailed the prospect of a fair day.—The Sun shone with radiant splendor; every eye was brilliant with glee, and the cheeks of youth and beauty glowed with the rich carmine of health. Visits were paid, gifts presented, gratulations offered, and tokens of love exchanged with all the...
I was so much fatigued from my journey that I found it impossible to write by Whitcomb he will tell you how very much the poor baby suffered and I hope it will be an inducement for you to come and fetch us as I really feel that George will be almost too great a charge for me alone he has quite recovered his fatigue and looks as well as ever the meeting with my friends was almost too much for...
I should have answered your very affectionate letter by this days post had I not been confined by one of my fits of the cramps &c. which owing to the fatigue of my journey and the unusual agitation of my spirits was attended with a considerable degree of fever I am however much better today and should be perfectly well if it was not for my hands which are extremely painful it is a return of...
I have recieved your very kind letters and should certainly have answer’d them sooner had I not been prevented by a disagreeable complaint in my hands I was very to understand from your last letter that you had again suffered an attack of your former illness I hope however that you have now entirely recovr’d your health and that the sight of your beloved Son will prove a cordial and contribute...
I wait with the utmost impatience for a letter from you as I am extremely anxious to hear of your safe arrival and likewise to know something about your future plans as it regards my return home I have recieved a very polite invitation from your mother to Quincey but as I am very desirous of bringing one of my sisters home with me I have hesitated about the answer I will candidly own to you...
I recieved your very kind letter late last night and hasten to answer it although I have already written by this post. You need be under no apprehension about your dear Boy as it is impossible for a child to be in better health and the terrible eruption proved to be nothing more than bug bites he has taken his weaning like a little hero and continues to grow very stout and hearty I talk to him...
I write you a few lines merely to mention that George is perfectly well and that I am almost tired of our seperation and extremely anxious to see you. I must draw upon you for the sum of twenty dollars as I have been obliged to purchace mourning on account of the death of Mrs. Hellen the Mother of Nancy’s husband the family all very anxious to see you papas not at all well. Adieu believe me /...
Richard has just brought me your note and I am very happy to hear you are all well. Betsys Mother must be mistaken as to her having had the Measles as she is now confined to her room which we hope she will leave tomorrow she has had them very favorably and at her age I think it a happy thing to have got through the disorder George we expect will have them next Sunday it is unfortunate as he...
I grieve to be under the necessity of informing you that I am again to be disappointed of passing next Monday with you at Quincy as the expence of a Carriage is double on account of the celebration of Independance . I shall certainly keep this Anniversary in the full conviction that we are too much the creatures of circumstances to enjoy much of th is e boasted blessing or I should not at this...
I recieved your letter dear Madam and should have answer’d it had not the illness of the two children prevented me John was very sick for cutting two teeth but is now perfectly recover’d and larger and fatter than ever George has been very ill owing to a severe cold which occasioned a smart fever for several days which reduced him very much he has not yet left his room but is nearly recover’d...
I received your two kind letters which gave me much pleasure as they informed me of your returning health I am sorry to tell you that Mrs. Cranch still continues very ill although much better I called on her last week but was not admitted to see her as she still kept her bed We live so far from Mrs. Cranch I did not hear of her illness untill ten days after she lost her child the Children have...
I send you the enclosed which I recieved two days since and should not have delayed so long had I not been in hourly expectation of hearing from you. The children are both pretty well. John is about more teeth and suffers a little with his gums but is as fat as ever, my own health is so indifferent I shall certainly wean him next month. I have not yet heard of an opportunity to send the Trunks...
I recieved your very kind letter and was rejoiced to hear that you had arrived safe at New York as I was a little apprehensive Patty might occasion you some trouble on the road. I am extremely glad she performed her journey so well. It is painful to me to renew the subject of our last letters but I cannot suffer you to suppose that I remained here from choice had I had the slightest prospect...
I recieved your letter my best friend the day before yesterday which afforded me much pleasure as it assured me of your safe arrival at home I know not but it appear’d to me that your letter were not in good spirits when you last wrote you do not say you are well and I fear the fatigue of your journey has proved injurious rather than serviceable beneficial I had 20 Cents to pay Postage for...
I write you again my beloved friend in the greatest anxiety to hear from you as I fear’d from your last letter that you were unwell since last Sunday I have not heard from you and though I cannot flatter myself you can devote more than one half hour in a week to me yet I no sooner recieve one letter than I anxiously look forward to the time in which I think it probable I may recieve another...
I recieved your Kind favour of the 24th Yesterday morning never did a letter prove more welcome as I had suffer’d a great degree of anxiety at not hearing from you it is three weeks since the date of your last and I was very apprehensive your had been prevented from writing by indisposition I am wretched if you do not write me once a week at least to inform of your health—It is perhaps fancy...
I recieved your favor of the 3d three days since it gave me real pleasure as you appear to be in good spirits and write much more cheerfully than you have done some time past— I was much surprized at the change you mention in Mrs. Whitcombs person she wrote Caroline she had been unwell but I did not think she had been seriously sick— I have just done reading Madame de Staal’s new Novel which...
I sieze the earliest opportunity of answering your very kind letter of the 9th which I did not recieve untill friday evening owing to a of violent Storm of Thunder and Lightning and the heaviest Rain ever Known in this part of the Country by which the roads have been so much injured that the Mail was delayed one day I never witness any thing like it Mrs. Hellen who continues in a very weak...
I recieved your very kind favors of the 14th 20th & 24th. on Friday & Saturday & Should certainly not have delayed answering them so long had I not been prevented by a severe attack of the Spasms attended with a considerable degree of Fever which have tormented me these three days. I am pretty well to day and certainly one should not complain as though the Spasms were very violent they were...
I send you enclosed a couple of Profiles one of which I wish you to present to Mrs. Adams if you think they it will prove acceptable I am told mine is a very fine likeness and Caroline who likewise takes this opportunity of offering one to your mother has I think been equally fortunate the other you can keep or give to Mrs. Whitcomb if you do not want it they were taken by a Mr. Todd, a...
I recieved your kind favor of the 31st on Friday Evening with the Bill enclosed for which I return you many thanks I am rejoiced to hear that you Garden affords you so much amusement and hope to find it in high order against next summer I think if you intend to make any alterations in the House as there is nobody at present residing there it would be better to have them done this Summer We...
I send you enclosed the bill of Lading & Key of your Trunks which I suppose will have arrived in Boston when you recieve this letter— I drank tea the night before last at Mrs Pichons their little Boy is very sick P. is really recalled but does not quit this country untill next spring Mr. & Mrs. Bonaparte are gone but from what I heard a few evenings she is not likely to meet with a very...
I am anxiously waiting to hear from you and only write to inform you that our little darling has entirely recover’d his health and looks as well and as handsome as ever He will not run alone so soon as I could wish I hope however he will in the course of a month should he continue well George is very well and grows quite fat again Your Absense begins to be insupportable and the time which yet...
I recieved your last very kind letter two days since and return you many thanks for your verses the idea is extremely beautiful and I should be much delighted to see it dressed in some other form by you I do not admire the versification at present whatever you do write must be more grateful to me than the best piece that ever was penned— I followed the multitude today and went to pay my...