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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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From a conversation that I had with my brother last evening I find that the Letter I mentioned to you in confidence yesterday had been much misunderstood. I think it my duty to mention this fact that no injustice should be done to any party and that you may not think me rash and precipitate in my judgements— Present me to Mrs. Southard and return me the note franked which accompanies this /...
What! a letter from George I cried when your father put your last epistle in my hand yesterday afternoon? I was surprized for I thought that you ceased to wish to keep up any thing like friendly intercourse with your family and to feel that I was not altogether forgotten in the solitude of my chamber did occasion my heart to spring with joy. I am delighted to observe by the tone of your Letter...
I am very much afraid my Dear Thomas in consequence of your not writing to me according to your promise that you are not going on exactly as I wish I therefore write you not to preach but to entreat that you will be more attentive to your friends and answer their Letters— Your brother is gone to Rockville and his health is very much improved. Mary has grown quite fat and I never saw her look...
According to my promise I write to you again altho’ I do not feel quite sure that you will have time to read my Letters or that they will be more acceptable than the nonsensical scraps of poetry which I used to plague you with last Summer generally by the advice of Charles—but as that mania appears to be over I shall only write you short occasional Letters to let you know how we go on altho’...
Thank you my Dear George for your Letter and the Farce which arrived safely the day before yesterday and which I should have answered yesterday had I not been again confined to my chamber by a return of my Fever and many of the inflamatory symtoms which attended my illness in Boston—I was taken ill the day after I wrote to Hariet and went out too soon which occasioned a return of the Fever...
Having received a very elegant Lace Cap from the Ladies of the Lace school at Newport I write to request that you will do what you think proper while there as to the expression of thanks and the real admiration which the extreme beauty of the work deserves—as it is really equal to the finest European Lace—We leave Boston tomorrow morning and expect to be at New York on Friday night— Give my...
Your Note and packet came safely to me a few days since and I write a few lines merely to say that Mr. Adams has fixed the 4 of October to leave this place for home and that I do not think he will travel very rapidly—I hope Charles took the Letter out of the Post Office at Philadelphia and returned you the fifty Dollars I shall be uneasy until I hear I wish you would see and ask to write down...
I wrote you a very few lines yesterday my dear Charles, with a promise to write to you again immediately and more fully, but I fear that it will not be in my power to say all I wish to say, and for that you will thank your stars—In the first place let me beg you will not suffer Johnson to leave the house to sleep in his barn ; for the consequences might prove fatal to him—In the next let me...
I send this enclosure and add a few lines to state that I shall leave this place on Wednesday for Washington and hope to find Letters from you in New York—We shall go by the way of Hudson and Poughkeepsy— Yours Ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I intended writing to you yesterday but was prevented by a feverish indisposition which I believe was occasioned by the Water—I am much better to day, and hasten to inform you of our movements with which you have not been able to keep pace because they have been so variable— At Mrs. de Wints I was constantly sick during my stay, and appeared to be growing worse every hour—I found afterwards it...