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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
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Having received a very elegant Lace Cap from the Ladies of the Lace school at Newport I write to request that you will do what you think proper while there as to the expression of thanks and the real admiration which the extreme beauty of the work deserves—as it is really equal to the finest European Lace—We leave Boston tomorrow morning and expect to be at New York on Friday night— Give my...
I send this enclosure and add a few lines to state that I shall leave this place on Wednesday for Washington and hope to find Letters from you in New York—We shall go by the way of Hudson and Poughkeepsy— Yours Ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I intended writing to you yesterday but was prevented by a feverish indisposition which I believe was occasioned by the Water—I am much better to day, and hasten to inform you of our movements with which you have not been able to keep pace because they have been so variable— At Mrs. de Wints I was constantly sick during my stay, and appeared to be growing worse every hour—I found afterwards it...
I have been so very sick the last day or two it has been impossible for me to write you I am still very much indisposed but intend to proceed to Albany this Evening in the Steam Boat I believe my illness is occasioned by the keeness of the air which has reproduced most of the symptoms of the last Summers complaint The weather is however much warmer to day and I hope I shall soon be better in...
We have arrived safely here after a tolerably pleasant journey and a very pleasant visit at Borden Town although poor Mrs. Hopkinson was sick the greatest part of the time—I sent Charles on to secure me apartments and Mr Biddle accompanied me to this City in the Steam Boat from Washington—but our passage was boisterous and disagreeable— Charles King informed me last night that he had forwarded...
I was so much hurried when I wrote to you from New York that I am afraid you could scarcely read the scrawl—We left that City yesterday Morning and arrived here at about seven o clock last Evening—Mrs de Wint is much better than she has been and I find her looking very well— In consequence of Mr Kings having enclosed your Letters to me under cover to yourself at New York I have been much...
Having just received a letter from John I wish to know if you are desirous that I should come on before the affairs are settled as I have no interest in the concerns and as I am aware of the difficulties incident to the settlement I think it will be better for me to have nothing to do with it as it is impossible for me to steer clear of breakers however I may wish it I shall proceed to New...
From the earnestness of my last Letter I am much afraid that you may think as is often the case with my friends that it proceeded from ill temper—It was most assuredly not with such a motive or in such a disposition that it was written It sprung from the feeling of anxiety which the extreme difficulty of your situation produced and under the idea that Mr Quincy had relinquished his charge...
I yesterday sat down to answer your last Letter, and wrote two, neither of which I have sent, as the nature of my feelings were was such that their expression could not have been agreeable—Altho’ still under it unpleasant impressions, and knowing that neither my opinions or feelings will ought avail, I consider myself in duty bound to write, lest you should misinterpret my silence and deem it...
I did not write you yesterday because I was so much fatigued I was obliged to lie down as soon as I returned from the Capitol—The services were tolerable in the manner peculiar to both the Gentlemen who officiated, and were a happy specimen of the tame and the bombastic—Mr. Port’s prayer was handsomely made for you; and I think the Doctor had a leaning to the Sage of Quincy, which appeared...