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    • Adams, Charles Francis

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, Charles Francis"
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I wrote you a very few lines yesterday my dear Charles, with a promise to write to you again immediately and more fully, but I fear that it will not be in my power to say all I wish to say, and for that you will thank your stars—In the first place let me beg you will not suffer Johnson to leave the house to sleep in his barn ; for the consequences might prove fatal to him—In the next let me...
As I am afraid you will hardly recieve my Letter in time I hasten to tell you that if you have no part assigned to you you must come on directly so as to be here on Wednesday Week when Genl La Fayette is to pay us a visit and I want you to assist me in doing the honours of the House— Give my love to all and tell George to send the Silk by you to your affectionate Mother MHi : Adams Papers.
The perpetual trouble and occupation we have found in getting into our new residence has prevented my writing to you my dear Charles and even now I have no subject on which to occupy your attention— The situation in which we found the House made it necessary to furnish almost entirely anew a large portion of the apartments and the whole time of John and my self has been engrossed in...
Keep up your spirits my dear Son and do let the outrageous slanders and misrepresentations of the day make any impression on your mind as the very people are from whom the Slanders emanate acknowledge that they are only invented for electioneering purposes— A Presidential Election is becoming so fiery an Ordeal it will soon require more patience I had almost said more Virtue than falls to the...
Since my return home my Dear George Charles I have been so much engaged it has been almost impossible for me to write more especially as I have been even more sick than ever and even my intellect seems to suffer from these constant attacks— Genl La Fayette has passed through our City and like all Meteoric lights has illumed our horizon for a few days and I fear darkened many of the pockets of...
I received your Letter my Dear Charles yesterday Eveng. and hasten to answer it from the apprehension that some expressions in your Letter indicate a sort of temper to the Col Tutors which may become dangerous although at this moment it may be harmless—Words of strong signification brought into familiar use frequently I believe produce effects which we have no idea of while using them and...
Eh b’en Mon petit Caporal honours seem to thicken so fast on Adams race we can scarce find time to greet or congratulate ere a new event occurs to call forth our gratitude. Well chaqu’un a son tour. And now it is my turn to be brought before the publick by the classic pen of Mr. Colvin or some of his Satellites with the kind intention of blackening the reputation of your father!!! and what is...
During my long absence from home my Dear Charles I could not write to you as it was difficult to procure conveniences for the purpose business and the chambers were not furnished in a suitable manner for those purposes— I am happy to learn from John that you are well and in very good spirits and I hope that the Commencement will pass without any unpleasant occurrence—I am very glad that Thomas...
I am very sorry my dear Charles that any thing in my last Letter should have wounded your feelings as it was very far from my wish or intention to say any that thing that could intimate so absurd a charge as I have hitherto found you more docile than youths of your age generally are. I hope you propose to pass your vacation at Quincy as I think it will give pleasure to your Grandfather to whom...
I hasten to answer your last my Dear Charles as I cannot bear your reproaches which I feel I merit for my total want of exertion—The complaint under which I am labouring however must plead my excuse as it entirely incapacitates those who are subjected to it from performing all active duties by debilitating both mind and body to a degree of almost imbecility— I am happy to learn that you are...