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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I enclose you a Letter from one of your young correspondents which was received a few days after your departure and which I suppose you would regret very much to lose. In taking the Desk which your Brother lent you I want to know what you did with the papers which were in it among which the two Contracts of Mr. Van Coble were placed and I am very much concerned at not being able to find them...
I have just received your little and your big Letter, and return you many thanks for both, which gave me infinite pleasure—As I am not at the head of so large a literary Institution as Mr. Shaw, I am not so fastidious in my taste; and find your production very good, considering the circumstances under which it was written: and I have no doubt, that altho’ it was full of defects as to the...
During my long absence from home my Dear Charles I could not write to you as it was difficult to procure conveniences for the purpose business and the chambers were not furnished in a suitable manner for those purposes— I am happy to learn from John that you are well and in very good spirits and I hope that the Commencement will pass without any unpleasant occurrence—I am very glad that Thomas...
I was much pleased to observe that you had taken more pains with the writing of your last Letter than you generally do and sincerely thank you for it as all these things prove your affection for me much more strongly than could possibly be manifested by any other method and immeasurably encrease maternal affection by adding esteem to the strong ties of nature—You have yet but little idea of a...
We yesterday went fishing for the first time and to my great astonishment on looking up our Tackle found your rod or rather part of it as Mr. Philip appears to have injured very much and lost one of the peics—It answered the purpose however very and Mary had the benefit of it—Had I known it was not in your Trunk I should have sent it on with the Gun and am very sorry it was omitted I can find...
The easy manner in which you appear to take your College studies is diverting to me I confess but notwithstanding all your boast’s I flatter myself I shall assist at your Commencement with as much pleasure as I anticipate at John’s—The effect that your brothers success has produced upon your fathers spirits is such as to produce the greatest emulation in his Children for he has recovered his...
How I wish I could divide myself and fly to nurse you my poor Boy—If your Uncle had not still to suffer one or more operations you would see me as soon as the Boats could convey me to you—Your sad picture of the ennui which you endured is striking but I hope you benefited from your study of the rights of Woman which spite of the prejudices existing against Miss Woolstoncroft are undeniable and...
Poor Mariano is dead. On Sunday Even’—he was sitting reading the new Tragedy of Lord Byron when he laid the Book down and marked the page being as it is supposed siezed with the Cramp and ran across the street to his friend’s room for assistance across the exclaiming to have his arm cut I suppose meaning to be bled—The people thought him crazy and he died immediately after speaking these...
I am very sorry my dear Charles that any thing in my last Letter should have wounded your feelings as it was very far from my wish or intention to say any that thing that could intimate so absurd a charge as I have hitherto found you more docile than youths of your age generally are. I hope you propose to pass your vacation at Quincy as I think it will give pleasure to your Grandfather to whom...
Your two last Letters would have given me much pleasure if they had been more easy to decypher and I must sieze the present opportunity of assuring You that as a correspondent of mine you must endeavour to improve your hand writing which is at present such as to do you no credit and almost impossible for me to read—I question if it would have been easy to me in my best days but now that my...