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John Adams being invited to attend a celebration of the late anniversary, declined what it would have been the “joy of his heart” to have done, on account of his advanced age and increased infirmities of body. When his note was read to the company, the following toast was given— “ John Adams . Eternity yet lingers, withholding its bright rewards, till Time shall complete his earthly joy in the...
I have deeply regretted my total incapacity to comply with your flattering request in your two letters. But, I can no more write a line than, I can work a miracle. I thank you for the copy of Mr Jeffersons letter and unite with him in recommending the psalms of David, which whether we read them in our common English translation in prose, or in the versions of Tate and Brady or even those of...
I have deeply regretted my total incapacity to comply with your flattering request in your two letters but I can no more write a line than I can work a miracle. I thank you for the copy of Mr Jeffersons letter and unite with him in recommending the psalm of David which whether we read them in our common English translation in prose or in the versions of Tate and Brady or even those of...
I owe you a letter, but have not been able, and am not still able to acknowledge it—I am very low, but low as I am, I feel a longing to take a ride with you up your new road—to the top of Boylston Hill—Alias Waychusetts—But I might as reasonably wish to fly on a sunbeam to sirius the dog-star Our public affairs in this state go on pritty well but I am sorry for one event, the removal of Mr....
In answer to your letter I inclose you a letter from a friend in answer to your questions—Dr. Fothergills imagination was a mere fable, the vote for Independance was never foreseen till the day on which it was past it had been postponed by the by a thousand artifices for months before it did pass, And then it was forced upon them by the loud cry of the people—Oliver Cromwell’s fourth of July...
Congress having adjourned today puts such an quantity of time at a persons disposal that many know not what to do with it—This will never be the case with me when I have a letter of yours on hand unanswered. The first moment therefore is devoted to the purpose of reducing myself from any imputation of neglect. I am the more happy to write you to day as I now have it in my power to contradict...
You see I have taken the same liberty with your last which you did with mine & what is worse I have no excuse to give for it; therefore I will let the matter rest trusting to your goodness—I was most highly delighted yesterday at meeting very unexpectedly no other person than our late classmate George Peabody. He has just arrived in this City from Salem having come round by water from that...
Know all men by these presents, that I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Esqr do make Constitute and appoint, Samuel Frothingham of Boston in the County of Suffolk, Gentleman to be my true and lawful Attorney for me and in my name to transfer all my Seven per Cent Stock Standing in my name in the Book of the United States Loans, and to do all...
I have received your kind letter of the April 1st. And am very sorry it will not be in my power to give you more detailed information That your Father was a steadfast Patriot, of the Revolution, from its beginning to its end, is most certain—In the Congress at New York in 1765, he we though young, he was one of the most active and spirited members. In the Congress of 74—and in all the...
You have always been too good to me & I regret that I have never been able to make you any returns, your last favor to me is the most gratify in g of all because it shows that your kindness to me is not extinct, In answer to your question you may undoubtedly send any volume to me by mail free of expence, I shall be happy to receive it, though I cannot read it, I may have some of it read to me...
While I was prepareing to send to the Post office a letter to you, written on the 12th. I received yours of the 8th. I know not that I ever received a letter so consoleing to my heart and so refreshing to my spirits. It is kindness, candor and generosity—I am extremely sorry to hear that you have been sick, and the more so, that you are not yet well, but I still hope you will live to write me...
Your Elegant presents of a History & a Map of Washington, deserve my best thanks. The History of the rise and Progress of the City is realy delightful it is already a magnificent City—And in a few Years I think it must become one of the most beautiful Citys in the world—The Map I presume is correct—though I cannot see it—I spent but one Winter and one short Session of Congress there—And then...
I have received with kindness and thank fullness, your learned work upon the Constitution—I have had as much read to me as I have been able to hear—but inted to have it all read to me if I live It is long since I have ceased to write read, speak or think upon Theories of Government and now I am on at half way on my eighty ninth year I am incapable of either. I see you have treated me with...
I have received your kind latter of November 20th. and with the handsom present, of your Coloumbian Coffee samples of which I have used in my family and sent as presents to the Neighbouring shops—we find it a comfortable beverage as we do the Columbian Whiskey which they advertice and sell— We have the Philosophey of Rhetoric the Philosophy of Grammer—and the Philosophy of the human mind, and...
I recieved your last letter yesterday & now sit down to answer it although the times are so dull with us that I find it very difficult to obtain the subject-matter of an epistolary communication. Living as you do in the land of puritanism & steady habits I know not whether it is allowable for me to mention theatrical performances; but trusting that you have not by your short sojourn imbibed...
As it is delightful to be the bearer of good news or to have any hand in their conveyance without ceremony I must commence my letter by stating that the Cherokee lady & her husband as we say do not pull together or in shorter winds they fight—They have been here since his marriage but no one has seen them out. Rumour says they are war-like & I am sure I cannot say I am sorry for the fact. It...
I sincerely sympathise & condole with you in the Death of your Daughter in Law, such losses are afflictions that flesh is are to, though they are exquisitly rending to the heart, as I know by many severe experiences, I congratulate you however that your Daughter has left a Son, I hope to represent her & his father & G. B. to the entire satisfaction of all My wishes on a certain subject are...
Your kind letter of the 22d: February No 15 is as pleasing to me as the former numbers. I have not seen the Pilot. The young ladies, you speak of instead of tinkling verses and frivolous novels, had better read Dr Barrows sermons, get them by heart, and deeply impress them upon their souls. As to the Caucus I am glad you have not written me upon that, fir it si a very unedifying topic. The...
I thank you for your address to the Peace Society. I have heard it with great pleasure It is ingenious eloquent and learned. It shows a fine talent and I always read such benevolent compositions with delight. They always reccommend themselves to the best feeling of my heart—My natural wishes are for their success, but War is a mightier river than Mississippi or La Plata. We may wish it should...
Your letter of the 18th of January is full of candid, temperate and accurate criticism I know not whether a more lively idea of Mr Clay’s eloquence could have been given me, by Aristotle, Longinus, Dyonisius Halicarnassus, Horace, Vida, Boileau and Pope. Mr Clay must have great powers of Oratory. Your remarks upon emphasis, are judicious and important. I have written this pedantic list of...
After waiting somewhat impatiently I allow for your last it came to hand on friday & delighted me exceedingly as it contained much information concerning our classmates of whom I hear nothing in any other way. One thing I have heard however by the newspapers which I should have preferred not to have heard I mean the deat h of Levett. It would seem that we have hardly yet been long enough...
Your letter of the 28th: Decr. is an epistle of a sage. I will tell you a story, of ancient days. “When I was a Sophomore at College, my mother and her Sister Ann Adams, Wife of my Uncle Ebenezer Adams, came to spend the day with me. On looking round my room, they thought I wanted several little articles of accomodation, which they did not see. They asked why I had not this thing, that thing,...
I thank you for your letter of 13th. And as I Applaud very much your occupation, I should be happy to assist you if it was in my power, but it is not, I have never preserved phamplets or newspapers, I never had leisure to attend to it, And have given away every thing of the kind, almost as soon as I had read it, The greatest collection that I know of in the World is in the Atheanum in Boston,...
I have received your circular of the 12 inst & I thank you for the honour you have done me in addressing it to me. Be assured my heart beats in unison with yours and with those of your constituents & I presume with all the really civilized part of mankind in sympathy with the Greek suffering as they are in the great cause of liberty & humanity The gentlemen of Boston have taken measures to...
I return your letter at your request signified by Gen. Dearborn though it has been such a cordial to my heart—I feel much reluctance to release it. Since it has appeared in print it has been received with applause—great & universal. Our fellow citizens are determined to elect a President avec connaisance de cause—for the question has in discussion in every nook in the United States for seven...
I return your letter at your request signified by Gen. Dearborn though it has been such a cordial to my heart—I feel much reluctance to release it. Since it has appeared in print it has been received with applause—great & universal. Our fellow citizens are determined to elect a President avec connaisance de cause —for the question has in discussion in every nook in the United States for seven...
I am under great obligation to you for the Presidents message, & for the Documents of the War Office, & Navy Office, and I am proud to see how abley and faithfully the Government is conducted, & these communications are the more acceptable, as comeing from a Grand Son of my beloved Brother I wish you a pleasant and satisfactory session, / and am your obliged / Uncle MHi : Adams Family Papers,...
I regret that a disagreeable but unavoidable circumstance prevented my writing to you on Sunday as my rule heretofore pursued required & this is the first moment I have had since that time. The circumstance to which I allude was an absence from this city occasioned by the sickness of a young friend & relation of mine who has just entered upon the practise of that profession, a knowledge of...
Your kind letter of the 14th. has given me great pleasure, I congratulate you on the Birth of your fifth Daughter. God Bless the lovely little creatures, may they all imitate their Mothers & Grand Mothers from the seventh or eighthth generations such a race of Mothers has rarely existed in this world I believe. I hope you will educate them as you Grand Mother was educated, by reconciling...
I recieved two days since your favour of the 30th of last month for which I am as thankful as usual. By some strange combination of circumstances I find we have both chosen the Sabbath day for writing our communications. This in me is nothing as I am in the land of dissipation & what Ticknor would call “heartless frivolity” but in you who sojourn in the land of the blue laws & good habits is...
I have seen many of your poetical effusions from the time when you were at College, to the last Month, And there are so many indisputable proofs of natural, and social affections, and genuine poetical imagery; that if you had cultivated the muses as much as you have politicks, you might have made a Shakespear, a Milton, or a Pope, for any thing that I know— How sweet an Ovid, is in Murray...
I have seen many of your poetical effusions, from the time when you were at College, to this last Month. And there are so many indisputible proofs of natural and Social affections, and genuine poetical imagery that if you will had cultivate the muses as much as you have politicks you might have made a Shakespear, a Milton or a Pope, for anything that I know, how “How sweet an Ovid, is in...
“Where Adams from a noisy world withdrew Sick of Glory faction, power & pride Sure judge how empty all, who all had tried Beneath his shade the weary chief reposed And Life’s great scene, in quiet virtue closed ” I have received your kind letter of 11th. November and I believe another before it unacknowledged, for both of which, I thank you— The 30th. of October passed ever like all other days...
Night before last I recieved your communication in answer to my last which was as welcome as all the others recieved from you. I must thank you for a great deal of amusement which it all afforded me; Your description of a certain society astonished me somewhat & I was glad to see that even one individual dared to raise his voice “like a pelican in the wilderness” against such a crying sin....
Your account of the first part of your journey, is quite as entertaining and instructive as is that of the latter part, recorded in your former letter. The seventy persons on board the steam boat who were obliged to sleep in mats covered with a blanket, reminded me of my excellent friend and physician, Dr Holbrook’s account of the treatment of the small pox in Canada when our Revolutionary...
With real pleasure I received your kind letter of July 28th. though I received it but a few days ago. I thank you for introduceing to me Major Wolcott Huntington —whose appearance and manners do honor to both his names— I rejoice to hear that you enjoy so good health and I wish, that your Life may be prolonged for the Government of Connecticut as long as mine has been; which has been extended...
Your last letter was brought to me from the Post office when at breakfast with my family. I bade one of the misses open the budget, she reported a letter from Mr. Jefferson and two or three newspapers. A letter from Mr. Jefferson says I, I know what the substance is before I open it; There is no secrets between Mr. Jefferson and me, And I cannot read it, therefore you may open and read it—When...
Your last letter was brought to me from the Post office when at breakfast with my family. I bade one of the misses open the budget, she reported a letter from M r Jefferson and two or three newspapers. A letter from M r Jefferson says I. I know what the substance is before I open it; There is no secrets between M r Jefferson and me, and I cannot read it, therefore you may open and read it—when...
The very great despatch with which you have answered my last not only proves to me that you are desirous of continuing the correspondence of which that letter was the commencement on my part, but requires immediate thanks & accordingly to show you that I shall not be backward in furthering its continuance I hasten to answer you although your letter was but last night recieved & although this...
I thank you for two letters written at two notable periods of your life one at the happy meeting of your family at Providence and New York, the other at Washington all in health written with the vivacity, and spirit for which you are so remarkable. They gave me and the whole family a great deal of pleasure and excite an appetite for your account of the first part of your journey. We have...
I have received your kind letter of the 20 inst & should be glad to give you any information in my power with respect to your family: There was a gentleman of your name who was a judge of the judicial court in Nova Scotia. He educated a son at Harvard college who was John Adams the poet, who was a theologian & man of genius, as his writings both in verse & prose which are still extant...
you will be surprised at receiving this Letter. But I hope you will pardon the curiosity of dotage, I wish to know whether the records of the Town and Church of Charleston were destroyed in the great Fire of the 17th. of June 1775. if any of them remain, I wish to know what remains concerning the Revrend Thomas Shepard once Minister of that place my Wifes Great Grand Father, Daniel Quincy...
With much pleasure I have heard read the sure words of prophecy in your letter of Sep— 4th. It is melancholy to contemplate the cruel wars, dessolations of Countries, and ocians of blood which must occure, before rational principles, and rational systems of Government can prevail and be established—but as these are inevitable we must content ourselves with the consolations which you from sound...
With much pleasure I have heard read the sure words of prophecy in your letter of Sep 4 th It is melancholy to contemplate the cruel wars, dessolutions of Countries, and ocians of blood which must occure, before rational principles, and rational systems of Government can prevail and be established—but as these are inevitable we must content ourselves with the consolations which you from sound...
I thank you for your letter of the 12th I am extremely sorry to hear that Genll Miller has lost so much of his Health. I esteem him not only the bravest among the brave, but a gentlemen of superior intelligence of a very enquisitive sagasious and penetrating mind, in short One of the soundest characters I know. will you be so good as to present to him my affectionate respects—& sincere thanks...
I have received with great pleasure your kind letter of the 6th: inst with your discourse before the Phi Beta Kappa. So kind a letter from a gentleman of your name, a name which I have respected for half a century is peculiarly gratifying to me.—I had once a friendship with the late Vice President of the U. S. and first Govr: of the State of New-York, which was very dear to me. Although in...
Watchman! what of the night!? Is darkness that may be felt to prevail over the whole world? Or can you perceive any rays of a returning dawn? Is the devil to be the “Lords anointed” over the whole globe? Or do you forsee the fulfilment of the prophecies according to Dr. Priestly’s interpretation of them? I know not but I have in some of my familiar and frivolous letters to you told the story...
Watchman! what of the night!! Is darkness that may be felt to prevail over the whole world? Or can you perceive any rays of a returning dawn? Is the devil to be the “Lords anointed” over the whole globe? Or do you forsee the fulfilment of the prophecies according to D r Priestly’s interpretation of them? I know not but I have in some of my familiar and frivolous letters to you told the story...
You have much better advisers than I can be—but I will venture suggest one line. As Nature will attach you sufficiently to your own contemporaries may I here suggest to you to seek the society and conversation of ladies and gentlemen older than yourselves. Such is the advice of your assured friend Printed Source--M. A. DeWolfe Howe, ed., The Articulate Sisters (Cambridge, 1946)..
I am greatly obliged to you for your letter of August 6th. And also for the pamphlet enclosed with it and most of all for your message to the legislature the kind expressions of your personal esteem and regard are very flattering to me. The subject of the pamphlet is too nearly interesting to my personal feelings for me to make any comments upon it: but I will say it is the most spirited and...