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I am indebted to you, for more Letters than I can repay at present. But declaring myself a Bankrupt, You must except of a few shillings in the Pound. Indeed I suspect the Debt is greater than I know of. I saw in the Courier de L’Europe, Part of a Letter from you to Dr. Dubourg, which was intercepted, in which you refer him to me for a long Letter you wrote me upon our military affairs &c. But...
The inclosed letter from Dr Bartleet of Charleston, offering himself a candidate for a medical appointment in case; I transmit to you, because I believe the law has committed the medical marine Establishment to your care. If I am mistaken in this, you will please to give this letter & its inclosures to Mr. Stoddert. Dr. Bartleet is as worthy & respectable character as any we have. Last night I...
The resolutions of the Town of Quincy passed on the same day and presented to me by you in their Name are perfectly satisfactory and demand my affectionate gratitude. The harmony and unanimity with which the Town have accepted the instrument of conveyance, and their approbation of the restrictions, limitations, and conditions expressed in it, is very gratifying to me and receives my best...
I have received a very kind Address Subscribed with the Names of a long List of your respectable Inhabitants, expressive of very patriotick Sentiments and the most virtuous Resolutions. These decided Appearances from Kentucky of respect to the Union, Affection for its Government and determination to defend it against all its Ennemies will be received with Joy, in every Part of the United...
Since the joyfull News of the Reduction of Boston by the Forces of the united Colonies, my Mind has been constantly engaged with Plans and Schemes for the Fortification of the Islands and Channells in Boston Harbour. I think that if Cannon and Ammunition, in the necessary Quantities can possibly be obtained, Fortifications ought to be erected upon Point Alderton, Lovells Island, Georges...
I have received your letter of the 8th of Jany. inclosing an address from the inhabitants of the Mississippi territory, which is very acceptable and pleasing to me. For the polite manner in which you communicated this kind attention of your fellow citizens to me, I pray you to accept my thanks. The situation, in which your country has placed you, is at present of great importance to its...
I am honoured with your Letter of the 24. May & from a regard to your father as well as yourself, I should be glad to give you my advice, or render you any service in my power that might be usefull to you, but from your Letter I perceive your attachment to the Dutchess of Kingston, is so strong that you will be likely to be of her Grace’s Party let my advice be what it may—The Duty you owe to...
I have recd your favor of the 5th of July with your Letter to Chanceller Livingston on Some Points of the natural History of Buffon and Jefferson, and your other Letter to Gerrit Boon. Col. Lincklain by whom you Sent them has not favoured me with a Visit—if he Should I Shall Shew him all the Civility in my Power. I have read the Letters with great pleasure. There are too many Subjects of...
I am honoured with your’s of the 11 th. You will please to accept of my thanks for the kind Care you have taken of my Son, who is I hope before this with you, and to repeat my humble thanks to the Duke for his goodness upon this Occasion. My Younker ought to think himself highly honoured; by the Notice that has been taken of him by so many respectable Personages. M r. D’Asps Letter I will send...
A Reminiscence, as the French phrase it, of Civilities received from you and your Brothers, whenever I have met them in France England or America, emboldens, me to introduce to you a Gentleman of Virtuous Character and Worthy Connections. Mr Theodore Lyman Junr of Boston. He is modest, Studious and inquisitive.— I have had this Winter the pleasure of a Visit from your Brother and his Lady, and...
I have now before me your several favours of 18th July, 4, 11 & 17th of August, and 31st October.—I am very much obliged by your kind attention to me, in all these instances, and for the News papers you have Sent me from time to time— I have attended with some care and with great pleasure to your correspondense with the Secretary of State, which will do you much honor—I wish it could be more...
I received two days ago your favour of July 24th inclosing a of the Otsego Herald and several other printed papers in Prose and verse. I thank you Sir for the amusement you have given me in these Compositions. There is a good deal of Wit and diverting humour in those in Verse. A great mathematical Controversy that once in a Century invariably puzzles Mankind like a Riddle is completely decided...
I had the Honour of yours of 24 Jan. only yesterday. F. Silas Deane is indeed arrived here, but I cannot learn that R.R. Edward Bancroft is. I have not been honoured with a Visit, as yet, nor have I seen him. There is a Courier arrived from Petersbourg, who carried the News of Sir Yorkes leaving the Hague. Alls well in the north. The Spirit here waxes warmer. A new Play is brought upon the...
I know not that I ever received a letter with more pleasure than yours of the 30 June last except the circular from your committee which I received some days before. The wisdom & liberality generosity of your Legislature in making a liberal appropriation of money for the benefit of schools Academies colleges & the university is an equal honor to them & their constituents—a proof of their...
I have the Honour of your Letter of the 17th. instant, inclosing the 66 Bills of Exchange accepted by me, amounting to Bf. 109780, which you have paid, and for which you, have debited the Account of the United States of America. I Yesterday received your other Favour of the 25th. instant, inclosing 17 Bills of Exchange, Accepted by me amounting to Bf. 16,220 which you have paid, for the United...
Long before the death of Mr Tudor I had a design to address to you a few Letters upon Subjects which I knew he could not keep from the knowledge of the numerous inquistive People who Surrounded him.— You, I know can keep Papers to yourself, Whatever I may write to you, I pray may not be published in my Life-time; After my death, I leave them to your discretion.— I neither expect or desire any...
After a journey without any accident, I arrived here, in good health, the Friday night after I left you, and went into lodgings, which I did not find convenient, and the next morning removed to Francis’s hotel, where I have good accommodations, with company enough. I forgot to thank you for your kind present of patriotic manufacture; but I own I am not, at my age, so great an enthusiast, as to...
Your Favour of the 3d I duely received and am very much obliged to you for the Trouble you have taken in Writing to my dear Mrs. Adams, and in sending her a few Merchandises to the amount of 229 Livres: 6 s: 9 d which Sum I will immediately pay to Mr. W. T. Franklin as you desire, and I should have been very glad to have paid an additional sum for your Commissions. We are in the Midst of an...
I thank you for your favour of July 26. I always rejoice to hear of your Arguing Causes. This Arguing is the way to business. Argue; Argue; Argue; forever when you can, and never be concerned about the issue, any further than you ought to interest yourself for truth and Justice. If you Speak in public, tho you loose your cause, it will Serve your reputation, if you Speak well, as much as if...
I received yours of the 5th. instant by Tuesdays Post, and laid it before the Board of War, who recommended Monsr. Weibert to Congress for the Rank and pay of a Lieutenant Coll., and the Office of an assistant Engineer, to which he was appointed, without opposition and the President I suppose will transmit his Commission by the first opportunity. I am happy to learn that his Conduct, Skill,...
Every one of your letters has given me great pleasure, and none more than No. 6. Aug. 15 just received. I am much pleased with the progress of your studies especially in the language of the Muses. When you are Master of the Greek all other Tongues Arts and Sciences you may want, will be easily in your power. You ought also to bestow Some of your attention upon Numbers and Figures as well as...
I thank you for your kind letter—And will proceed with my abrupt narrative— The practice of the British Government—by their instrument the Governor, and his friends and subordinate Agents in this little Parish of Quincy—was as Arbitrary and disgusting as their professed Religions, and Political principles and Theory.—You know the general History of Governor Shirley but perhaps you may not...
I have received the Letter you did me the Honour to Write me yesterday, and observe with pleasure your Friendly Sentiments towards my Country. America is growing more & more interesting every day to mankind, and your Countrymen have greater cause to expect a cordial welcome in it than any other. I doubt not you may lay out your money there to advantage, but some Skill and discretion will be...
Permit one to enclose to you a Packet from my old Friend Governor M Kean: and a dialogue of the dead. The latter was the effusion of a musing moment of an evening at Richmond Hill when Congress sat at N York in 1789 immediately after the arrival of the news of Dr Franklins death. Searching last Sunday among a heap of forgotten rubbish for another paper, It struck my eye. After you shall have...
I have this day received the Letter which you, did me the honour to write me, on the 8. and am much obliged to you for your candid kind Communications, which will be of much Use to me, as I hope in bringing the Treaty to a just Conclusion. I rejoice that the City of Amsterdam has decided upon the matter so amically and candidly, and whenever any Propositions or Remarks shall be made to me My...
I have received your Letter with the Copy inclosed, which has affected me too tenderly, to write any other Answer at present than this, that I have ever vindicated your Character as far as lay in my Power, from the Suspicion of having written that anonimous Libel the only case that I have ever heard of, in which it was endangered: and that I Shall ever continue to vindicate it, because I...
I thank you for a valuable present of the transactions and Collections of the American Antiquarian Society, it is a work no less valuable than curious— Posterity as well as present Age will be under no less great obligations to your society—for their labours and researches—I have always regreted my inability to become a Member of it—but a great variety of reasons too many to be enumerated had...
Must we, before we take our departure from this grand and beautiful world, Surrender all our pleasing hopes of the progres of Society? Of improvement of the intellectual and moral condition of the World? Of the reformation of mankind? The Picmon Revolution Scarcely assumed a form; and the Niapolitain bubble is burst. And what Should hinder the Spanish and Portugese Constitutions from rushing...
I received your letter of June 16: and am glad to learn that you "gain a little". If as I have learnt from Dr Manning, the leaders of your councils have an intercourse with the disaffected in Massachusetts, and as appears by your letter a correspondence with antifederal members of a more august body: it is probable there is a chain of communication throughout the states. If such should be the...
Your two Letters containing the Anecdote and the Preliminaries have been recd., and You have seen the use of them. I have at length a friendly Letter from Mr. Jay, who tells me some good News, which I must not communicate. I have Letters too from Petersbourg with other News. Upon the whole they are consulting upon Preliminaries at Paris, and concerting Plans elsewhere for a Congress. If the...
When it is Said that it is the Prerogative of omniscience to Search Hearts, I Suppose it is meant that no human sagacity, can penetrate at all Times into Mens Bosoms and discover with precise Certainty the secrets there: and in this Sense it is certainly true. But there is a sense in which Men may be said to be possessed of a Faculty of Searching Hearts too. There is a Discernment competent to...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
I have just now recieved the Letter, which You did me the Honor to write me yesterday , and I thank You, Sir, for the Loan of the English Paper s, which I shall carefully return, and beg the Loan of the oth ers, as y ou can spare them, until those shall arrive, which you have ordered for me: for the Trouble you have taken in ordering those Papers; for your kind Enquiries after my Son, who has...
I am going tomorrow Morning on an Errand to Lord Howe not to beg a Pardon, I assure you, but to hear what he has to Say. He sent Sullivan here to let Us know that he wanted a Conversation with some Members of Congress. We are going to hear him, but as Congress have voted that they cannot Send Members to talk with him in their private Capacities but will send a Committee of their Body as...
The Day before Yesterday, M r: Boudinot called upon me, with Dispatches from the President of Congress, his Brother. There were two Letters addressed to the “Ministers” and these I opened but found little or Nothing but Duplicates of Dispatches, receiv’d by you before I left Auteuil. There are two letters, and one large Packet addressed to you, which I have the Honour to transmit by M r:...
M r Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...
Your Letter to Waterhouse inclosed in yours of the 16th. Shall be Sent tomorrow. With them came the News of the Hornets Glory. If Our Nation had as much Religion as Jews or Gentiles, they would consider these Victories as a Revelation of the Importance and Necessity of a maritime defence. Lawrence is now enrolled with Hull, Decatur, Jones Bainbridge in the Record of our Naval Conquerors....
I have had the pleasure of receiving your letter and should be happy to furnish you with any hints concerning the study of the Civil Law, which may to occur to me after having laid aside all such studies for many years. Under the general phrase Civil law is often understood what is commonly considered the learning necessary to obtain a degree of Doctor of Laws LLD the common abreviation...
I have the honour to inclose to your Excellency, a Copy of the fresh Instructions of Congress of the Sixteenth of August last which I received by the Post the 23d instant. I have also received a further Commission, from Congress, with full Powers, to confer treat, agree and conclude with the Person or Persons vested with equal Powers, by his most Christian Majesty, and their high mightinesses...
Your Address which has been presented to me by Mr Cochran your Representative in Congress, is very welcome to me. Should France in the Spirit of Rapine and destruction attempt the Practice of her Menaces I have no doubt the History of our Second War, will be worthy of the Records of the first. I am afraid that free Government is a subject which will never be under The delusive Theories of...
Lord! Lord! What a Coat you have cutt out? It would require an hundred Taylors for twenty years to make it up. I would not undertake to make a Button hole in it, during the whole Remainder of my Life. I thank you however, for the sketch of your contemplated Work. I shipped, on board the Carriage of my Son in Law Colonel William Stevens Smith the two first Volumes of The Memoirs of your...
What are We to infer from the Indecision of the present Ministers?— Do they expect to draw their Country out of her Embarrassments; to preserve her Credit,; to avoid a Bankruptcy; to Settle a Plan with Ireland; to pacify Scotland &c &c &c, by a Sour Countenance towards America? We desire nothing but our natural Advantages in Commerce? if these are refused can it be expected that our People...
I last night received by the post, an anonimous letter, together with a pretended copy of a process from John Allen, Justice of the peace against Mr. Tracy, in the name of Pearsall & Glover of N. York. As Mr Tracy is at present employed in the public service, as an agent of the War office, by the appointment of your predecessor, with my consent, I think it most proper to transmit these papers...
In the 116 page of the inclosed Mercury, you will find the Strictures upon Lord G. Germaines nonsense. I dont see them in the English Papers. I suppose no Printer dares insert them. But I Swore they shall be seen, and therefore I beg you to get them inserted in the Leyden or Amsterdam or the Hague Gazette or all three. If it cant be done without pay let them be paid. I will repay in a moment....
The inclosed Letter from the Sec. of State I pray you to convey in Safety and as Soon as may be to Berlin. I ought not to omit the opportunity to thank you for the Pamphlets you have Sent me from time to time. They not only entertain and amuse me but I flatter myself are Usefull. Our Country Seems to be, as we used to Say in 1774 unanimous & firm. They are much more So now than they were then....
I do myself the honor to inclose to your Lordship a letter this moment received, from the Master of a Vessell belonging to the United States of America.—His name is John Douglass, commander of the Ship four friends—American built & the property of Andrew Van Tuyl mercht of New York—He informs me, that as two of his people were going on shore for provision for the day they were seized by the...
I am honoured with yours of 5. You will honour and oblige me much sir, by your Thoughts upon the Subject of European Jealousy and Caprice, hinted at. You will see that the Empress has undertaken to mediate between E. and Holland, but she will not join the Emperors Mediation but on two Conditions Sine quibus non. These are 1. an Acknowledgment by England of American Independance. 2. An...
While I am reading a Letter from you, I almost forget that I have lost my delightfull Corrispondent of forty Years—I thank you for information, upon many points. On the subject of J. Q. A, I cannot write, or Speak. My heart is too full. I see his Destiny. He is to be depressed and oppressed by an immense load of Jealousy, Envy, Malice and Revenge, as your Father and his Father have been before...
I have received your letter of the 8. Oct & I thank you for your civilities. It is a comfort in old age to receive the testimony of an contemporary especially from one of so respectable a character, of his opinion that we have done any good in any part of our lifes. Whatever public good the publication you mention may have done at the period of its original publicaton composition or since its...
I have recd your favour of the 17th and return you three Warrants signed, which you may fill up for General Collot, Mr. Sweitzer and the Person mentioned in Mr. Kings Letter, if he is to be found. I could trust the Heads of Departments with this Power, rather than my own Judgment; But I think We ought to give the Act a strict Construction, and therefore doubt the Propriety of delegating the...