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Draught of a treaty of Amity & Commerce between her most faithful Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarva’s and the United States of America— The Parties being willing to fix in a permanent & equitable manner the rules to be observed in the Commerce they desire to establish between their respective Countries, have judged that the said end cannot be better obtained than by taking the most...
Art. XI. 2 + There shall be, a full and entire Liberty of Conscience allowed, to the Inhabitants and Subjects of each Party and no one Shall be molested, in regard to his Worship, provided he Submits, as to the public Demonstration of it, to the Laws of the Country. There Shall be given moreover Liberty when any Subjects or Inhabitants of either Party, Shall die in the Territory of the other,...
And it is further specially agreed that except the liberty of introducing woollens into the kingdom of Portugal which has been ceded to certain nations in compensation for their privileges yeilded on their grant to the commerce of Portugal, shall not be understood to be communicated to the citizens of the U. S. by this or any other article of the present treaty. which is the effect of a...
Observations Sur le Traité D’Amitie et de Commerce. N. 1 ere. We must conform ourselves, as to the Titles to the following Rule “between her most faithfull Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarves”. &c Art. I. N. 2 We must observe in this Article the Same Rule, above established. The Rest will meet with no Difficulty. Art. II. N. 3. The same Observation, in the words underscored. it...
Your favor of this morning, announcing the unanimous Resolution of the States of Utrecht taken yesterday in favor of American Independence, is just come to hand. I had recieved a few Minutes before a french Gazette of Utrecht, containing the same Article: but I am very happy to recieve it in a more authentick manner from a Gentleman of so distinguished a Reputation for Patriotism. The...
I have received from the hand of one of your Senators in Congress Mr Bingham your public and explicit declaration of your Sentiments and Resolutions, at this important Crisis, in an excellent Address. Although it ought not to be Supposed that young Gentlemen of your Standing should be deeply versed in political disquisitions, because your time has been Spent in the Pursuit of the Elements of...
Yours of June 23d. have received. I believe there is no Danger of an Invasion your Way, but the Designs of the Enemy are uncertain and their Motions a little misterious. Before this Letter is sealed, which will not be till Sunday next, I hope I shall be able to inform you better. I rejoice at your fine Season, and still more at my Brother Cranches Attention to Husbandry. Am very glad he bought...
This is one of my fortunate days. The Post brought me, a Letter from you and another from my Friend and Brother. The particular Account you give me of the Condition of each of the Children is very obliging. I hope the next Post will inform me, that you are all, in a fine Way of Recovery. You say I must tell you of my Health and Situation. As to the latter, my Situation is as far removed from...
This Letter will go by the Hand of the Honourable Samuel Hewes Esqr., one of the Delegates in Congress from North Carolina, from the Month of September 1774, untill 1777. I had the Honour to serve with him upon the naval Committee, who laid the first Foundations, the Corner Stone of an American navy, by fitting to Sea the Alfred, Columbus, Cabott, Andrew Doria, Providence, and several others....
I am not surprized at your Anxiety expressed in your Letter of the 25 th. which I rec d Yesterday. The Conduct of certain Mules has been so gloomy and obstinate for five Months past as to threaten the most dangerous Effects. The Proceedings of Boston N. York & Philadelphia now compared with their intemperate folly last July or August is a curious Specimen of Negotians with foreign Courts &...