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By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangements for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his Services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gratifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangement s for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gartifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
I have had read to me, your valuable Journal of your Campaigns in the American revolutionary war, and I have no hesitation in saying, that it is the most natural, simple, and faithful narration of facts, that I have seen in any history of that period. It preserves the memory of many men, & many facts, of which I was wholly ignorant until I heard that book read to me, particularly the conduct &...
I send this letter by my two grandsons, George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams to congratulate you on your happy arrival in your country after so long an absence. There is not a man in America who more sincerely rejoices in your happiness and in the burst of joy which your presence has diffused through this whole continent than myself. I would wait upon you in person but the total...
I ought to have answered your kind letter of the 23d July—before now, but decrepitude and imbecility cannot do what it wishes. I cannot read, & I cannot search for the Resolutions you speak of— It is in vain to enquire, who, moved this or that resolution you may depend upon it that the movers of the greatest resolution in Congress were not the Authors of them—I will not tell you who were the...
I am very glad you have employed your leisure houres, in so honorable & useful a service, as the composition of you r great work on the Criminal code—I pray you to make what use you please of my name & especially to place it among your subscribers for its publication—If I was a Man of fortune I would publish it myself & place it in a conspicious view in Our Quincy Library—We have lived...
Mr Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...
Mr Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of my old friend Mr Brackett, who is advancing with me far in our eighty ninth year, is desirous of an introduction to you. I hope your family will receive him with kindness. He seems to have a passion for seeing conspicuous characters, and I hope he will be gratified. He can inform you how faint and feeble I am, and how ardently I wish to see you and...
I still breathe in great weakness, but in my latest breath I shall wish for your health and prosperity and that of all your family. As to giving you advice concerning your concerns at Harvard University—I am utterly incapable of it. The conduct of that beloved and venerated Seminary is too refined and sublime for my dullness to comprehend. I presume not to censure any of its acts, though some...
M r Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...
John Adams being invited to attend a celebration of the late anniversary, declined what it would have been the “joy of his heart” to have done, on account of his advanced age and increased infirmities of body. When his note was read to the company, the following toast was given— “ John Adams . Eternity yet lingers, withholding its bright rewards, till Time shall complete his earthly joy in the...
I have deeply regretted my total incapacity to comply with your flattering request in your two letters. But, I can no more write a line than, I can work a miracle. I thank you for the copy of Mr Jeffersons letter and unite with him in recommending the psalms of David, which whether we read them in our common English translation in prose, or in the versions of Tate and Brady or even those of...
I have deeply regretted my total incapacity to comply with your flattering request in your two letters but I can no more write a line than I can work a miracle. I thank you for the copy of Mr Jeffersons letter and unite with him in recommending the psalm of David which whether we read them in our common English translation in prose or in the versions of Tate and Brady or even those of...
I owe you a letter, but have not been able, and am not still able to acknowledge it—I am very low, but low as I am, I feel a longing to take a ride with you up your new road—to the top of Boylston Hill—Alias Waychusetts—But I might as reasonably wish to fly on a sunbeam to sirius the dog-star Our public affairs in this state go on pritty well but I am sorry for one event, the removal of Mr....
In answer to your letter I inclose you a letter from a friend in answer to your questions—Dr. Fothergills imagination was a mere fable, the vote for Independance was never foreseen till the day on which it was past it had been postponed by the by a thousand artifices for months before it did pass, And then it was forced upon them by the loud cry of the people—Oliver Cromwell’s fourth of July...
Congress having adjourned today puts such an quantity of time at a persons disposal that many know not what to do with it—This will never be the case with me when I have a letter of yours on hand unanswered. The first moment therefore is devoted to the purpose of reducing myself from any imputation of neglect. I am the more happy to write you to day as I now have it in my power to contradict...
You see I have taken the same liberty with your last which you did with mine & what is worse I have no excuse to give for it; therefore I will let the matter rest trusting to your goodness—I was most highly delighted yesterday at meeting very unexpectedly no other person than our late classmate George Peabody. He has just arrived in this City from Salem having come round by water from that...
Know all men by these presents, that I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Esqr do make Constitute and appoint, Samuel Frothingham of Boston in the County of Suffolk, Gentleman to be my true and lawful Attorney for me and in my name to transfer all my Seven per Cent Stock Standing in my name in the Book of the United States Loans, and to do all...
I have received your kind letter of the April 1st. And am very sorry it will not be in my power to give you more detailed information That your Father was a steadfast Patriot, of the Revolution, from its beginning to its end, is most certain—In the Congress at New York in 1765, he we though young, he was one of the most active and spirited members. In the Congress of 74—and in all the...
You have always been too good to me & I regret that I have never been able to make you any returns, your last favor to me is the most gratify in g of all because it shows that your kindness to me is not extinct, In answer to your question you may undoubtedly send any volume to me by mail free of expence, I shall be happy to receive it, though I cannot read it, I may have some of it read to me...
While I was prepareing to send to the Post office a letter to you, written on the 12th. I received yours of the 8th. I know not that I ever received a letter so consoleing to my heart and so refreshing to my spirits. It is kindness, candor and generosity—I am extremely sorry to hear that you have been sick, and the more so, that you are not yet well, but I still hope you will live to write me...
Your Elegant presents of a History & a Map of Washington, deserve my best thanks. The History of the rise and Progress of the City is realy delightful it is already a magnificent City—And in a few Years I think it must become one of the most beautiful Citys in the world—The Map I presume is correct—though I cannot see it—I spent but one Winter and one short Session of Congress there—And then...
I have received with kindness and thank fullness, your learned work upon the Constitution—I have had as much read to me as I have been able to hear—but inted to have it all read to me if I live It is long since I have ceased to write read, speak or think upon Theories of Government and now I am on at half way on my eighty ninth year I am incapable of either. I see you have treated me with...
I have received your kind latter of November 20th. and with the handsom present, of your Coloumbian Coffee samples of which I have used in my family and sent as presents to the Neighbouring shops—we find it a comfortable beverage as we do the Columbian Whiskey which they advertice and sell— We have the Philosophey of Rhetoric the Philosophy of Grammer—and the Philosophy of the human mind, and...
I recieved your last letter yesterday & now sit down to answer it although the times are so dull with us that I find it very difficult to obtain the subject-matter of an epistolary communication. Living as you do in the land of puritanism & steady habits I know not whether it is allowable for me to mention theatrical performances; but trusting that you have not by your short sojourn imbibed...
As it is delightful to be the bearer of good news or to have any hand in their conveyance without ceremony I must commence my letter by stating that the Cherokee lady & her husband as we say do not pull together or in shorter winds they fight—They have been here since his marriage but no one has seen them out. Rumour says they are war-like & I am sure I cannot say I am sorry for the fact. It...
I sincerely sympathise & condole with you in the Death of your Daughter in Law, such losses are afflictions that flesh is are to, though they are exquisitly rending to the heart, as I know by many severe experiences, I congratulate you however that your Daughter has left a Son, I hope to represent her & his father & G. B. to the entire satisfaction of all My wishes on a certain subject are...
Your kind letter of the 22d: February No 15 is as pleasing to me as the former numbers. I have not seen the Pilot. The young ladies, you speak of instead of tinkling verses and frivolous novels, had better read Dr Barrows sermons, get them by heart, and deeply impress them upon their souls. As to the Caucus I am glad you have not written me upon that, fir it si a very unedifying topic. The...
I thank you for your address to the Peace Society. I have heard it with great pleasure It is ingenious eloquent and learned. It shows a fine talent and I always read such benevolent compositions with delight. They always reccommend themselves to the best feeling of my heart—My natural wishes are for their success, but War is a mightier river than Mississippi or La Plata. We may wish it should...
Your letter of the 18th of January is full of candid, temperate and accurate criticism I know not whether a more lively idea of Mr Clay’s eloquence could have been given me, by Aristotle, Longinus, Dyonisius Halicarnassus, Horace, Vida, Boileau and Pope. Mr Clay must have great powers of Oratory. Your remarks upon emphasis, are judicious and important. I have written this pedantic list of...