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The first public Body, which has proposed a Connection with the United States, is the quarter of Oostergo, in the Province of Friesland. The Proposition is in these words: “Every impartial Patriot has a long time percieved, that in the direction of affairs relative to this War with England, there has been manifested an inconcievable Lukewarmness and Sloth: but they discover themselves still...
This day was brought me, your kind favour of August 28th. the first Line I have received from you, Since We parted. A Line from my dear Son, aug. 21. O.S. which I recd 3 days ago, was the first from him. The publick News from America, you have before now. It is grand and I congratulate you upon it, with a gratefull Heart. Our allies have this year adopted a System, which you and I have long...
Amsterdam 13 December 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, III, f. 426–429). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 5:43–44. This letter, read in Congress on 15 March 1782 and acted upon on 26 March ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the...
I have received your friendly Letter of the 10th of this month. The new Translation of the american Constitutions, into the Dutch Language, I have not yet Seen, but intend to embrace the first opportunity of Sending Some Copies of it, to be placed in the principal publick Libraries in America, and the more willingly for the Dedication of it to Mr Vanberckel, a Gentleman whose great merit and...
I have received your Favour of 23 of November, and thank you for your Congratulation on my freedom of Amsterdam, which however cost me dearer, than any Freedom ought ever to cost any Man, except the freedom of the New Jerusalem. I rejoice with you also that my Countrymen, with the masterly and magnanimous assistance of yours, have added a gallant Cornwallization, to the Burgoinization with...
I have recd the Letter which you did me the Honour to write me on the 8th. instant, inclosing a Translation of Messrs Van Arps Proposals. Messrs Van Arps, in the Character of ships Husband, demand 60,000 ƒ. as Damages &c. If I were convinced that the Goods of the United States of America, were responsible for any Damages at all in this Case which I am not but clearly of the contrary I should...
This morning were brought me four Bills of Exchange drawn on Mr. Laurens on the 6th. of July 1780 for 550 Guilders each. I have desired time to write to your Excellency, and obtained it. But as there is a large Number of these Bills not yet arrived, and as they come in sometimes by single Bills, and generally in small Numbers at a time, it will be giving your Excellency much Trouble as well...
LS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society This morning were brought me four Bills of Exchange drawn on Mr. Laurens on the 6th. of July 1780 for 550 Guilders each. I have desired time to write to your Excellency, and obtained it. But as there is a large Number of these Bills not yet arrived, and as they come in sometimes by single Bills, and generally in...
I recd. your kind Congratulations from Leyden on the glorious Captivity of Cornwallis, and have since recd. your favor of the third, inclosing two packets from America. You ask what News? I answer none. They were the Originals of Dispatches from General Washington, and General Knox, containing the Capitulation and other Papers which are public. A large Reinforcement is gone to my friend Green...
I have delivered your Excellency’s Letter to Mr. de Neufville, and have written to him myself, making the proposals contained in your Letter to me. He answers me, that he thinks the proposals reasonable: but insists upon it, that he has not the commanding Interest in the Concern, and that nothing can be done but by the Owners at large, or by Mr. Van Harp as Ships Husband. He seemed alarmed at...
LS : American Philosophical Society I have delivered your Excellency’s Letter to Mr. de Neufville, and have written to him myself, making the proposals contained in your Letter to me. He answers me, that he thinks the proposals reasonable: but insists upon it, that he has not the commanding Interest in the Concern, and that nothing can be done but by the Owners at large, or by Mr. Van Harp as...
I have recieved those Instructions, with which I was honoured by Congress on the sixteenth of August, and communicated them forthwith to the French Ambassador to their High Mightinesses, and to the American Ministers at Versailles and Madrid. The Duke de la Vauguyon was of opinion, that they were very well considered, and very well timed, to counteract another Trait of British Policy, in...
I have no authority to interfere, in the Direction of the Continental Goods, which Mr Gillon contracted to convey to America, but Such as is derived from the Desire of Dr Franklin, to take the best care of them in my Power. I therefore hold myself obliged to observe his Excellencys advice in this Business. In a Letter from his Excellency of the 26 Novr, he observes “The owners of the Ships...
Your favours of September 29 and Oct. 21. are before me. I avoided saying any Thing about Charles, to save you the Anxiety, which I fear you will now feel in its greatest severity a long time. I thought he would go directly home, in a short Passage, in the best Opportunity which would probably ever present. But I am dissappointed. Charles is at Bilbao with Major Jackson and Coll. Trumbull who...
Last night I received yours of the 12 Novr. and am very sorry to find, that you were not likely to sail as you expected. My dear Mrs. Adams has heard that Charles is coming home in Gillon and has a Thousand Anxieties about him which will increase every Moment untill his Arrival, but when We trust ourselves to Winds and Waves We must be patient under their Caprices. I thank you for the good...
Last night I had the honor of yours of the 23d. and 26th. Ulto. If it should be convenient for Mr. Barclay to come here and take the Care of the Goods, it would be happy for me. I am also very happy to learn from your Excellency, that our Troops are tolerably well cloathed, and will be in a short time completely so. This Information will make me less anxious about a little unavoidable delay,...
You cannot imagine how much I am obliged to you for your early Information of the glorious News. I have Since received ample details of it from America, but your Letter reached me several days Sooner. I last night recd yours of 23 Novr—and will write you more fully upon it soon. We shall agree in every Thing I believe but the Article of L 6857: 3s, which you charge me for 29 Feb. 1780, as an...
Last night I received your favour of 28 Novr.—and shall take the proper Care of the Papers enclosed. I must beg your Pardon for not having regularly answered your Correspondence, lately as I ought, but I have had too little Health, and too many other affaires, to be punctual to pay my debts to my friends. I thank you, Sir, for your Humanity, Patriotism and Friendship in advancing 100£ for the...
I was last Evening, favoured with your Letter from Vigan of the fourteenth of November, and am very much obliged to you, for writing to me, upon this occasion, a Letter, which notwithstanding your modest and amiable Apologies does the highest Honour, to the Taste and mental Accomplishments of the Writer, and to the Virtues of a Daughter worthy of my excellent friend President Laurens. Believe...
LS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; transcript: Harvard University Library Last night I had the honor of yours of the 23d. & 26th Ulto.— If it should be convenient for Mr. Barclay to come here and take the Care of the Goods, it would be happy for me. I am also very happy to learn from your Excellency, that our Troops are tolerably well cloathed,...
I have recd your favours of the 14 and of the 26. I thank you for the Extract, and hope you will discover by whom and to whom it was written. That they do not give to me, a very blind Confidence is true. That they have given orders to some Persons to Spy me, may be true. That they know me to be an honest Man, and inflexible in the cause, and perhaps some times too ardent, I am certain. That I...
I have recd your favours of 14 and 26. I thank you for the Extract, and hope you will discover by whom and to whom it was written. I dont See the Virtue nor the Wisdom, nor the Honour of writing Such Things to the English. It would be Sufficient, one should think to write them to America. However, just as they please. As long as they pursue with tryumphant success, the System, which was urged...
While you were at Sea I recd the inclosed dispatches with a desire to open them if you were absent, which I did, and read them with very great Pleasure. Mrs searle’s Letter I did not open you will receive it as I did. I have received your kind Letter from L’orient. The dispatches for Congress are not now of Consequence, as Duplicates and Triplicates of them have arrived by Newman and Brown....
I had the Honour to write you, on the 26 instant by the Post, a Conveyance which I am determined to try, untill I am certainly informed of its Infidelity, in which Case, I will ask the favour of the French or Spanish Ambassador, to inclose my dispatches. I received by the last Post, a Duplicate of Dispatches from Congress the originals of which I received Sometime ago. I presume you have recd...
I am this moment honoured with your Letter of Yesterdays date and I thank you for your kind Congratulations, on the News from America. May Great Britain ever Send to America, while she continues to send any, only such brave, able, active and enterprizing Generals as Cornwallis and Burgoine. Every Such General will consume them an Army of Ten or Fifteen Thousand Men, every Campain, without...
I presume You have a Copy from Congress of their Instructions to me of the 16th. of August: but as it is possible it may be otherwise, I have inclosed one. I have communicated them to the Duke de la Vauguion, who says they are très bien vues, très bien combinées. I shall do nothing in the business, without communicating it beforehand to him, with the most entire Confidence, and recieving his...
By the last Post, I recieved from L’Orient a sett of fresh Instructions from Congress, dated the 16th. of August, and with the more enjoined to open a Correspondence with your Excellency, upon the subject of them. I presume You have Copy by the same Vessel; but as it is possible it may have been omitted, I shall venture to inclose a Copy, and hope it may pass unopened. I have communicated it...
LS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society I presume You have a Copy from Congress of their Instructions to me of the 16th of August: but as it is possible it may be otherwise, I have inclosed one. I have communicated them to the Duke de la Vauguion, who says they are très bien vues, très bien combinées. I shall do nothing in the business, without...
I have the honour to inclose to your Excellency, a Copy of the fresh Instructions of Congress of the Sixteenth of August last which I received by the Post the 23d instant. I have also received a further Commission, from Congress, with full Powers, to confer treat, agree and conclude with the Person or Persons vested with equal Powers, by his most Christian Majesty, and their high mightinesses...
Mr Adams presents his most respectfull Compliments to his Excellency, the Duke de la Vauguion, and begs leave to acquaint him, that by the last nights Post he received from Congress Some important Dispatches which it is his Duty to communicate to the Ambassador of France. Mr Adams requests his Excellency, to inform him, what Hour will be most convenient for him to wait on him at the Arms of...