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    • Adams, John
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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As your Excellency has asked my Opinion of General Lees Plan, as explained in his Letter of the fifth instant, I think it my Duty to give it, although I am obliged to do it in more Haste than I could wish. I Suppose the only Questions which arise upon that Letter are whether the Plan is practicable; whether it is expedient; and whether it lies properly within your Excellencys Authority,...
It is with peculiar satisfaction that we are informed by your Speech to the two Houses of Congress, that the long, and expensive war in which we have been engaged with the Indians North west of the Ohio, is in a situation to be finally terminated; and though we view with concern the danger of an interruption of the peace so recently confirmed with the Creeks, we indulge the hope, that the...
We thank you, sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling Providence for the distinguished share of public prosperity and private happiness which the People of the United States so peculiarly enjoy. We are fully sensible of the advantages that have resulted from the adoption of measures...
Captain John of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by so many respectable characters, and in such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department, and to a Judge...
We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
In Complyance with your Request We have considered of what you proposed to us, and are obliged to give you our Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men; Such, whose Judgment and Integrity, may be most rely’d on; the Committee on the State...
Among the Candidates for the Honour of public Employment; under the new Government there is one, whose connection in my family, and public relation to me, in the late legation to St. James’s Would render my total silence on his account, liable to misinterpretation, as proceeding, either from want of esteem, confidence, or affection for him on the one hand, or to a failure of rispect to the...
As your Excellency has asked my Opinion of General Lees Plan, as explain’d in his Letter of the fifth instant, I think it my Duty to give it, although I am obliged to do it in more Haste than I could wish. I Suppose the only Questions which arise upon that Letter are whether the Plan is practicable; whether it is expedient; and whether it lies properly within your Excellencys Authority,...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...