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    • Adams, John
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 381-390 of 390 sorted by editorial placement
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M r Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...
By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangement s for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gartifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
Your friend Professor Ticknor is bound upon a Tour in Virginia, though he needs no introduction to you he has requested a letter from me, and I cannot deny him,—he carries his Lady with him; who is rich enough, and handsome enough, & amiable enough; And what can we say more— Is the present calm in the Political World to continue long or not? Our controversy will be settled in a short time, and...
Your letter of the 8 th has revived me—It is true, that my hearing has been very good, but the last year it has decayed so much, that I am in a worse situation than you are; I cannot hear any of the common conversation of my family without calling upon them to repeat in a louder tone . The Presidential election has given me less anxiety than I, myself could have imagined, The next...
We think ourselves possessed or at least we boast that we are so of Liberty of conscience on all subjects and of the right of free inquiry and private judgment, in all crises and yet how far are we from these exalted privileges in fact. There exists I believe throughout the whole Christian world a law which makes it blasphemy to deny or to doubt the divine inspiration of all the books of the...
Every line from you exhilarates my spirits and gives me a glow of pleasure—but your kind congratulations are a solid comfort to my heart. The good-natured and good-humoured acquiscence of the friends of all the candidates gives me a comfortable hope that your prediction may be fulfilled that the ensuing administration, will not be so difficult as in a former letter I had apprehended. Here we...
M r Charles Sigourney & Lady, a respectable pair in Hartford, Connecticut, the Husband a Son of my old friend in Amsterdam, and the Wife, a very conspicuous literary Lady, have requested a line to you, as they are bound on a journey to the seat of your University and wish I suppose an apology for visiting Monticello—I have lost your last letter to me, the most consolatory letter I ever...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance, a young Lawyer by the name of Josiah Quincy, and with the title of Col l being an Aid to our Governor. The name of Col l Quincy has never I believe been extinct for two hundred years. He is a son of our excellent Mayor of the City of Boston and possesses a character unstained and irreproachable. I applaud his ambition to visit Monticello and its...
Your letter of March 25 th has been a cordial to me, and the more consoling as it was brought by your Grandsons M r Randolph and M r Coolidge. every lady connected with you is snatched up, so that I cannot get any of them to dine with me, they are always engaged—how happens it that you Virginians are all sons of Anak, we New Englanders, are but Pygmies by the side of M r Randolph; I was very...