You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Recipient

    • Bowdoin, James

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Bowdoin, James"
Results 1-10 of 13 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I do myself the Honour to inclose to your Excellency as President of the Accademy of Arts and Sciences a Letter and a Sketch from our ingenious Countryman Mr Copley. The Artists who engraved the Plates for the Accademy, he thinks have failed in Perspective a fault that I suppose is easily corrected. With great Respect I have the Honour / to be, your Excellencys most / obedient & humble servant
The inclosed Letter of Sept. 9. from D r. Jon. Dryander to me, accompanied the Packet which I have addressed to your Excellency, for the Use of the Accademy of Arts and Sciences, for whose Service I shall always esteem it, an honour and a Pleasure to do any Thing in my Power. With my best Respects to your / Excellency and the Accademy, I have the / honour to be, Sir your most obedient / and...
I do myself the honour of inclosing a few Extracts of Letters written in 1783 to M r Livingstone, which it is to be presumed were laid before Congress: but I have not heard that the Plan Suggested in them of purchasing raw Sugars in France, Spain and Portugal, to be refined in Boston, New York and Philadelphia for Exportation to Russia, Germany & Italy, has been ever attempted, untill this...
I have lately written to Congress, An Account of the Sentiments and Conduct of the Lords of the Admiralty, upon Captain Stanhopes Letters, which will no doubt be transmitted to you from N. York. It consists in Substance in the Signification to Capt. Stanhope of the “Sensible Displeasure” of their Lordships, and in his Recall from the American Station. In a late Visit to the Hide a Country Seat...
I have at present only time to inform your Excellency that I have communicated to my Lord Carmarthen as private Information all that I have received from your Excellency. not having received orders from Congress concerning the whole of it, I could not make official use of it. His Lordship said that he was sorry to see there was such a Complaint: and that Lord Dorchester had Authority to settle...
There is a Letter from Dr. Lee, dated Bourdeaux Feb. 20th. which Says that he has a Letter from a confidential Friend which assures him that Ten Thousand Men, were obtained in Germany, and Vessell sent for them. That these with three Thousand British were to come out under Burgoigne. That Boston would certainly be attacked. That Howe would probably move towards Philadelphia. That Ministry...
It is difficult to ascertain with Precision the Designs of the Enemy: But by the best Intelligence We can obtain their Malice and Revenge against New England, is implacable. Their Intentions, most probably, are, to come over the Lakes and enter N. England by that Way, to attack it by the Way of Rhode Island, and also by the Way of the North or the East River. An Armament, may possibly be...
Your Excellencies Letter of the 12. of January I have had the Honour to receive, and am much obliged to you for the Information in it Your Opinion of the Policy of this Country, will be found in the Result of Things to be just, and your Reasoning in Support of it is so conclusive and at the Sametime, so obvious, that it is astonishing it has not its Effect upon the Cabinet. Every Consideration...
Your Excellencies Letter of the 12. of January I have had the Honour to receive, and am much obliged to you for the Information in it. Your Opinion of the Policy of this Country, will be found in the Result of Things to be just, and your Reasoning in Support of it is so conclusive and at the same time, so obvious, that it is astonishing it has not its Effect upon the Cabinet. Every...
I have lately written to Congress, An Account of the Sentiments and Conduct of the Lords of the Admiralty, upon Captain Stanhopes Letters, which will no doubt be transmitted to you from N. York. It consists in Substance in the Signification to Capt. Stanhope of the “Sensible Displeasure” of their Lordships, and in his Recall from the American Station. In a late Visit to the Hide a Country Seat...