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Our Coach is Still immoveable. The Anarchical Warriours are beat out of all their Entrechments by the Arguments of the Friends of Peace and order. But Party Spirit is blind and deaf. totally destitute of Candour—unfeeling to every candid sentiment. The People are alarmed and Petitions are coming from all Quarters, mostly in favour of the Treaty. The Business will not be finished, if the first...
I am not surprized at your Anxiety expressed in your Letter of the 25 th. which I rec d Yesterday. The Conduct of certain Mules has been so gloomy and obstinate for five Months past as to threaten the most dangerous Effects. The Proceedings of Boston N. York & Philadelphia now compared with their intemperate folly last July or August is a curious Specimen of Negotians with foreign Courts &...
The Result of Saturdays Debate in the H. of R. removes all Anxiety for the Remainder of this session, and leaves me at Liberty to ask Leave to go home. The state of my own Health which requires Relaxation and the sickness in my Family and Neighbourhood, would have well justified me, if I had retired even before the great Question was decided. I shall ask Leave this Day, unless something...
We lodged at Monroe’s in Marlborough on Wednesday night, at Hithcocks in Brookfield Thursday night, at David Bulls in Hartford Fryday night and at Lovejoys in Stratford last night. I have been to hear Sound orthodox Calvinism from M r Stebbins this morning. At Hartford I Saw M r Adets Note in Folio to our Secretary of State, and I find it an Instrument well calculated to reconcile me to...
I Spent a pleasant Day before Yesterday with M rs Smith and her Children at East Chester where they now live. At night the Col & his two Brothers came home from hunting Patridges and Quails an Amusement which had engaged them two Days. Halcyon Days are over, at that house but Horses are still very plenty. Yesterday I came to Town and have been happy with My son and Daughter here. The Baby is...
After Spending a Day and a Night at East Chester with our Children there and another at Newyork with our Children there I came to this City on Fryday night after a cold ride of 80 miles from Elizabeth Town. There are great Complaints of Want of Water for grinding, for Cattle and for Families through the whole Country. Yesterday I dined with the President in Company with John Watts the King of...
I have rec d your Letter of the cold Sunday on which I wrote you one from Stratford. In N. York Charles gave me the original Letter, the Duplicate of which you transmitted me. I communicated it to the P. with five preceeding Numbers. After reading them The P. was pleased to say that “M r Adams’s Intelligence was very good, and his Penetration and foresight very great. At least Things appeared...
Inclosed are Some Signal Accomplishments of Prophecies. Be cool and discreet in your Communications of them. No Such Person as Jasper Dwight is known to either of the Senators of Vermont. The Signature is thought to be fictitious. I have no Letter from you later than the Sunday after my Departure. Major Butler has indeed resign’d. They kept back Paines Letter Several Weeks, presuming no doubt...
I have just rec d your fav r. of the 4 th. I wrote you from stratford New York and from Philadelphia. Adets Note has had some Effect Pensilvania and prov’d a Terror to some Quakers and that is all the ill Effect it has had. Even the southern States appear to resent it. If Col Hamiltons personal Dislike of Jefferson does not obtain too much Influence with Massachusetts Electors, neither...
I rec d this morning your kind Letter of the 7 th. and wonder you had not rec d a Letter. I wrote from Stratford & Newyork and twice a Week since I have been here. your Anxiety for your Country is amiable and becomes your Character. Elevated Expectations of Grandeur and Glory as well as Prosperity have accompanied me through Life and been a great source of my Enjoyment. They are not diminished...
I went Yesterday at 12 O Clock to the Presbyterian Meeting House in Market Street to hear D r Rush pronounce an elegant and pathetic Elogium on M r Rittenhouse the late President of the Philosophical society. He made him out to be a good Man and a great Astronomer & Philosopher. This I agree and if he had not betrayed Jacobinical Weaknesses I should have liked him very well. D r Euwing is Sick...
I have this morning yours of the 9 th. Am glad you have mine from Stratford: you will receive others in Succession. I am not much chagrined at the disappointment of ploughing the Hill. The Spring will do. The more Seaweed is procured the better. I need not exhort you to get Wood. I am Glad M r Bass is provided for. I wish you to expend as little as possible in Labour except for Seaweed and...
I Yesterday dined at M r Binghams and Sitting next to Madam at Table, had Something like a political Conversation with her. She has more ideas of the Subject than I Suspected: and a correcter Judgment. She gave me the Characters of Several of the notable Foreigners, and I find has the Same Jealousies of them, which I have entertained. Talleyrand Liancourt, Volney, Caznove &c. Noailles is the...
I rec d yours of the 14 on Fryday: but had no Letter on Monday. According to present appearances, Jefferson will be Daddy Vice, and between you and me I expect you will soon See a more ample Provision made for him, that he may live in Style—and not be obliged to lodge at Taverns and ride in Stage Coaches. I See plainly enough that when your Washingtons and Adams’s are Stowed away our dear...
The Prospect that opens upon me presents Troubles enough of every kind.— I have made Some Inquiry concerning Horses and Carriages, and find that a common Chariot of the plainest Sort cannot be had under Twelve hundred Dollars, and if you go to a little more ornament and Elegance you must give fifteen hundred. The President has a Pair of Horses to sell, one 9 the other 10 Years old for which he...
I wish the new Year may be the happiest of your Life. Last Night I had a Visit from D r Rush, whose Tongue ran for an hour.— So many Compliments, so many old Anecdotes. To be Sure, My Election he Said, he had vast pleasure in assuring me Since it had been made certain had given vast Satisfaction in this City and State. Even those who had voted for another had a great Affection for me. M r...
I rec d Yesterday your favour of 23. of Dec r. from Boston. The old Patrioch, has got a Name of Old Scrathum, or old Scratch or Some Such Oddity that will amuse the Blackguards for a time. M rs Storers Verses are very shrewd The Story of my Muteness, or Incapacity to talk, I almost wish were true.— On Some Occasions. D r Walters Politeness to be Sure is conspicuous. It is enough at present to...
M rs Swan and her Daughters, conducted by M rs Otis came into the Senate Chamber this morning to see the Room and Pictures. There I had Opportunities to see for the first time the fair young Ladies. I send you Guillotina, the most wanton Muse of the whole ten.— dreadful Truths are told in jest— Dallas tho, innocent , Dallas is much injured. I have now rec d Votes from Kentucky the last state:...
I received to day, together, your Favours of the 31 st December 1796 and 1. Jan. 1797 Our H. of R. boasts that We are the most enlightened People in the World: but We behave like the most ignorant Babies, in a thousand Instances. We have been destroying all Terror of Crimes and are becoming the Victims of them. We have been destroying all Attachment and Obligation to Country and are Sold in...
on Tuesday when I waited as usual on M rs W. after attending the Levee, She congratulated me very complaisantly and Affectionately on my Election and went farther and Said more than I expected. She Said it gave them great Pleasure to find that the Votes had turn’d in my favour. &c I doubted whether their Prudence would have ventured so far. I believe it Sincere. Ket however the Stewart was...
M r Beale called upon me, a few Days ago and left your Letter of Dec r. 23 d. — Last Evening I presented him to the P. and M rs W. together with M r Howard, a son of D r Howard of Boston. You Say M r H. is very full of his Praises of M r Monroe— So is D r Edwards— He Says M
I went Yesterday to hear D r Priestley, in the Philosophical Hall of the University and there I met unexpectedly with D r Euwing and D r Andross or Andrews. Euwing Seems paralytic and falling very fast. The Drift of the Discourse was to shew the Superiour moral Tendency of the Jewish and Christian Religions, to that of all the Pagan Rituals ancient and modern. The Weather is moderated. I hope...
I rec d , Yesterday by the Post, the inclosed Letter, which excites a hope of more by the Same Ship. There is a curious Mass of matter in fermentation at this Time. The French and Spaniards are as injurious as ever the English have been. Washington retires and his Sucessor will have but a majority of three Votes at most. and as if, it were to irritate every feeling nerve a Land Tax must be...
It is now determined what the President has to depend on after the 4 th March. The Committee determined against raising the Salary of P. or V. P. The House which the P. had for 500 £ cannot again be had under 1000 £ — Horses are from 3 times to five times as high as they were Seven Years ago, Carriages three times as high—Provisions &c In Short all Levees and Drawing Rooms and Dinners must be...
I have rec d yours of January 22 d. I know not the reason you had not rec d Letters for a Week— There has not been a Week since I arrived in Philadelphia that I have not written you twice or thrice I agree with you that Something must be done for my Mother to make her Condition comfortable and respectable. A Horse and Chaise must be at her Command and I like your other Plan very well if she...
I believe I have not directly & expressly Answered your Letter, inclosing the Memorandum from M r Smith of the Price of a Chariot at Boston. I had before bespoke a new Chariot here, and it is or will be ready: so that there is an End of all further Enquiries about Carriages.— I hope as soon as the Point is legally settled you will have your Coach new Painted and all the Arms totally...
I hope you will not communicate to any body the hints I give you about our Prospects: but they appear every day worse and worse. House Rent at 2700 dollars a Year 1500 dollars for a Carriage 1000 for one Pair of Horses— All the Glasses ornaments kitchen furniture—the best Chairs settees, Plateaus &c all to purchase—All the China Delph or Wedgwood Glass & Crockery of every sort to purchase—and...
I rec d Yesterday together your Letters of the 28. 29. and 30 th of January. It is impossible for me to give any Directions about our affairs at Quincy. I shall be hurried here with Business and Ceremony. I like your Plan to get Mears but fear he will not agree to it. When you come here I hope you will bring all the Women you want. I would not have any other than N. England Women in the House...
The Die is cast, and you must prepare yourself for honourable Tryals. I must wait to know whether Congress will do any Thing or not to furnish my House— if they do not I will have no House before next Fall. and then a very moderate one, with very moderate Furniture. The Prisoners from Algiers arrived Yesterday in this City, in good health and looking very well. Capt n. stevens is among them....
just rc d yr s of 8. 9. 13 th. return sister Peabodys lovely Letter. John’s is gone to the P.— I could not withhold it. All thoughts of building a Barn or Coach house I must lay aside for this Year— I cant bear the thought of it.— My head and hands are so full—and Expences so great. in March I will send Provision for Taxes, Haydens Note &c French may break up the 4 Acres if he will. Brisler...
The Presbyterian Congregation have voted me the front Pew in their Church for my Family. It is an elegant new Building and the Pew is large I have bought me a Pair of Young Horses for a Carriage and a saddle horse. The Birthday was affecting and the Night Splendid but tedious to those who were too old to dance. I have now Settled all My Accounts with the senate as you will see by the inclosed...
The Congress have passed the Law allowing 14,000 d to purchase furniture. The State Legislature have done nothing about their new House: so that I shall take the House the President is in, at a 1000 £ or 2700 dollars rent, nothing better can be done. M r Jefferson arrived Yesterday and came to visit me in the Evening. Tomorrow will be a worse day than the 8th. of Feb. was. We are to take the...
your dearest Friend never had a more trying day than Yesterday. A Solenm Scene it was indeed and it was made more affecting to me, by the Presence of the General, whose Countenance was as serene and unclouded as the day. He Seem’d to me to enjoy a Tryumph over me. Methought I heard him think Ay! I am fairly out and you fairly in! see which of Us will be happiest. When the Ceremony was over he...
I have no Letter this Week and begin to fear that your Respect to our late P. has laid a foundation for a Sick Spring and Summer. Sometimes too I am jealous of unfair Play in the Post office to prevent me from hearing from you at the most critical Period of my Life. The public Papers must give you an Account of Proceedings, which I am wholly unable to describe. What Judgment is form’d of my...
Yesterday only I rec d yours of March 1.— am surprized you should have rec d none from me from 11. Feb. I have written never less than once a Week, seldom less than twice and 9 Weeks out of 10, three times, ever Since I left you. The Roads or some irregularity of the Post must have occasioned your disappointment. I hope you will obtain Mr Mears, but I must leave every Thing to you— The Load of...
I am So constantly engaged in Business most of which is new to me, that it Seems as if it was impossible to find time to write even to you— Yet I believe I write every Post. It proves to be a tedious Business to clear the Presidents house for me. I am now told it will not be ready this Week. You will See by the Gazette how the new Pensilvania House is disposed of. The Weather is bad— I have a...
I have yours of the 6 th. by the Post of this day. I have proposed to Brisler to give him 300 dollars and pay the Expences of his Wife and Children to this Place and back again to Quincy, when they return— And He and his Wife and Children are to live in the Family. This is pretty well— I must and will have him. I am peremptorily for excluding all blacks and Molattoes. I hope to get into the...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
I rec d. to day your favour of March 29 th. I write you every Post day and send my Letter to the office. If they do not come regularly to you it must be owing to the office. It would hurt me to refuse the request of my Nephew Elisha Adams: but you gave him and his Mother all the Answer in your Power. If D r Tufts has any Money of mine in his hands, I should be glad if he would Supply my Nephew...
Your Letter of the 31. of March made me unhappy because it convinced me that you were so. I Attribute the Cause of it all however, to the dangerous illness of Cousin Polly Smith which I am very sorry to her. The Deaths and dangerous sicknesses of your near Relations and intimate friends always affect your tender and benevolent heart with very deep and affectionate Impressions. I hope she may...
I have this day rec d , in your favours of the 5. 6. and 7 th. of the month the first Acknowledgment of the Receipt of my Invitations to you to come to Philadelphia and share in the Burthens of your friend. I hope you may have commenced your Journey before this day: but knowing how many dispositions you have to make, and how difficult it will be to make them I cannot promise myself the...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
Your Letters of the 21. 22. 23. and 26 of April are all before me— They have inspired me with all the Melancholly in which they were written. Our Mother and our Niece are gone to rest. The first a fruit fully ripe the last but a blossom or a bud.— I have Suffered for you as much as you have Suffered— But I could give you no Aid or Amusement or Comfort.— I pray God that these dispensations may...
I send you the Letters— I could not keep my hands off of Nabby’s. I beg her Pardon. They write me flattering Accounts from Phil a. M r Anthony writes most confidently. No danger. No fever—alls well.— When Brisler goes he should throw Lime into the Cellar Vault &c. I think We ought to have been together to day. But tomorrow will do. I am glad Malcom came out. We must prepare to go to Phil a....