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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I recollect with great satisfaction the many pleasant days, that in time of my departed Consort, we passed together in France, in England, and in America. And I now receive with peculiar pleasure your kind congratulations on a late event, which I devoutly pray may be propitious to this great and growing Country. Though I am every day awaiting my Summons, I should be very happy to see you here,...
I am much affected with your kind letter of the 4th. You are not alone Sir, in your change of opinion since 98. great numbers have since been convinced that at the sacrri sacrafice of my Popularity and my office I saved this Country from a ruinous and Foreign War and Civil War—. I thank you Sir for your two candid and civil letters—and for your kind congratulations on the choice of a...
I recollect with much satisfaction the friendly and familiar intercourse between Major Fuller his Lady and Daughter with my family in the days of my blessed Consort, and this recollection made your kind letter of the 14th. more pleasing and acceptable.— I thank you Sir for your Volume of defence which I perceive has softened the asperity of public opinion very much; I am no longer capable of...
Is not your lively imagination a little exalted, you certainly have exalted my name to a greater height than it would ever have arisen to, without your sublime compliment—I presume you have laid aside the thought of building an Hospital for despair on that height—I am sure my name ought not be associated with despair How I long to make you a visit, but I cannot get out of my Chamber yet, here...
I thank you for your kind congratulation of the Feby. 17—which you have fortified with so many strong reasons, none of which I can I contradict, or wish to refute; I have great reason to believe that the public opinion has changed with respect to me, since the year 98—great numbers have since been convinced that I saved this Country from a ruinous Foreign and Civil war, and some of them...
My father has this moment returned from Mr Owens lecture & informs me that he has not recieved any communication from the Senate relating to the confirmation of his nominations. If they have been acted upon he is not informed of the fact. The nominations you have seen—Concerning their confirmation you know as much or more than he does— Your’s &c 1/2 past ten o’clock— DLC : Peter Force Collection.
I have placed your Note in the hands of my father who has this minute returned home & he directs me to inform you that the Senate have not acted upon any one of the Nominations made to that body by him—And that of course the information mentioned in your note is incorrect. Perhaps it may allude to the confirmation three days since of some nominations made by Mr Munroe. If you do not possess a...
I have transmitted your letter to Mr Adams but in total despair of success. The heads of Department are jealous of the interference of the President in the appointment of their clerks. I never could get in one clerk into any office during the whole of my administration. You must apply to the heads of Departments if you have any hopes of success. The Representatives from N. York will probably...
John Quincy Adams was born in Braintree, now called Quincy, in the year 1767, in the white house, near the foot of Penn’s Hill, which you sir, once inhabited. I had been attending Plymouth Court the whole week under the greatest anxiety. Returning on Saturday afternoon from Plymouth, I met Dr. Tufts on Hingham Plain between Dr. Shute’s house and Mr. Cushing’s tavern, who informed me that I had...
I enclose you a letter from honest Spafford. I do it with great reluctance but he has so much merit in his New-York Gazetteer that I wish something could be done for him. I know however the difficulty indeed the impossibility that a President should get into any of the offices a single clerk. I tried to get Mr Dalton into an office in the Treasury Department. I proposed it to the Secretary who...
Every line from you exhilarates my spirits and gives me a glow of pleasure—but your kind congratulations are a solid comfort to my heart. The good-natured and good-humoured acquiescence of the friends of all the candidates gives me a comfortable hope that your prediction may be fulfilled, that the ensuing administration will not be so difficult as in a former letter I had apprehended. Here we...
Every line from you exhilarates my spirits and gives me a glow of pleasure—but your kind congratulations are a solid comfort to my heart. The good-natured and good-humoured acquiscence of the friends of all the candidates gives me a comfortable hope that your prediction may be fulfilled that the ensuing administration, will not be so difficult as in a former letter I had apprehended. Here we...
The events of this month, have been to me almost overwhelming. They have excited my sensibility too much for a man almost ninety years to bear. The multitude of letters of congratulations which I have received I can never pretend to answer, for it fatigues me to dictate even a few lines—but none of these letters have been more cordially welcomed than that of my friend Van der Kemp. I...
Your letter has given me great pleasure, and so have those of your brother John—they are lively, animating and cheerful, and at the same time judicious and prudent, which to me is of more importance than all the rest. This great nation appears to me to be as well satisfied as so great a nation can be and in their satisfaction I sincerely rejoice. What obligations does this event impose upon...
Among all the congratulations which I have rec’d upon this occasion more have affected me more tenderly than this from the bosom friend of my ancient & excellent friend Dr Rush. I feel a regret that yr worthy Son our Ambassador in England was not on this side the water upon the occasion. My best wishes attend you Madam & all yr children and will do so as long as I have any wishes. this cannot...
I recieved, as usual with great delight your letter of the 12th inst. Your account of all things is satisfactory—but on this great occasion, my dear Grandson, let us all reflect on the obligations this event imposes on us. Our joys ought to be no greater than the joys of the public. We ought all of us to collect ourselves and not suffer a single unbecoming word or action to escape us. A friend...
I have received with peculiar sensibility your friendly letter, of 11th. instant—because I knew it proceeded from a Gentleman of great respectability in society a Gentleman of great honor, integrity and worth, I wish you and yours every prosperity I long to write to our friend Jay but I am too faint and short-breath’d to dictate a few lines I am Sir your obliged friend / and humble Servant MHi...
I have received your letter of the 9th: Never did I feel so much solemnity as upon this occasion—the multitude of my thoughts and the intensity of my feelings are too much for a mind like mine in its ninetieth year—May the blessing of God Almighty continue to protect you to the end of your life as it has heretofore protected you in so remarkable a manner from your cradle. I offer the same...
your letter of the 6th. of January gave me much pleasure, to which was added was that of your Brothers for the lone of which I thank you and here-with return it— he writes in fine spirits, and I hope will be able to accomplish his designs, but what his views are unless he has been fortunate enough to find the affections of some fine English Lady of Moderate fortune, who is adventurous enough...
Your account of the Death and Character of General R. G. Harper gave me a great deal of pain, he was a man indeed of eminent character and great talents, he made a great figure in Congress and was considered a rival to Mr. Smith, till he was sent to Portugal; I am not able to give you any account of his Parentage, or the place of his birth, or that of his Education; The first that I ever heard...
We think ourselves possessed or at least we boast that we are so of Liberty of Conscience on all subjects and of the right of free inquiry and private judgment, in all cases and yet how far are we from these exalted privileges in fact. There exists I believe throughout the whole Christian world a law which makes it blasphemy to deny or to doubt the divine inspiration of all the books of the...
We think ourselves possessed or at least we boast that we are so of Liberty of conscience on all subjects and of the right of free inquiry and private judgment, in all crises and yet how far are we from these exalted privileges in fact. There exists I believe throughout the whole Christian world a law which makes it blasphemy to deny or to doubt the divine inspiration of all the books of the...
Your letter of the 8th. has revived me—It is true, that my hearing has been very good, but the last year it has decayed so much, that I am in a worse situation than you are, I cannot hear any of the common conversation of my family, without calling upon them to repeat in a louder tone. The presidential election has given me less anxiety than I, myself could have imagined, The next...
Your letter of the 8 th has revived me—It is true, that my hearing has been very good, but the last year it has decayed so much, that I am in a worse situation than you are; I cannot hear any of the common conversation of my family without calling upon them to repeat in a louder tone . The Presidential election has given me less anxiety than I, myself could have imagined, The next...
Mr. Alexander Townsend, bound to Washington has called to see if I have any Packages to send, having none I give him this letter of introduction though as I presume you know him personally, he will want none. Poor Baily still lives the life of a Spider:—and I fear you are soon to be cast in to the Crater of a Volcano. I am sorry to hear that Mrs Adams’s health is not so good as it has been I...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor & his Lady, this Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge and one of the most Conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson and is highly esteemed by him I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison, & he proposes to visit him Montpelier as well as well as...
Your letter, of the 21st. sprightly and entertaining like all the rest, has been recieved. I participate in all your apprehensions concerning the election. The odium, which has been conjured up against the family, is indeed a formidable motive of national action. Not a reason, not an argument even original; it is a prejudice! and it is a consolation to see that it does not prevail in...
I have received from Mr Curtis your valuable present of American Wine; whether it is made from original American Grapes or from plants imported from abroad is an equal proof that wine can be made in this country. Indeed Grapes are raised in the City of Boston and its neighbouring Towns in such quantities that wine might be made of them here. I have in my own garden a vine, of one of the finest...
I have received your respectful & affectionate letter of Novr. 4th. for which I thank you as well as for your Address before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association—The Address is neither unlettered nor unworthy of the Association to which it is addressed. It is a manly, well written and well informed peice of Composition. I feel a pride in it as the production of a Son of the Town...
I have received your kind letter of October 29th: and the four bottles of Native wine very politely sent me by John Adlum Esqr. of Georgetown. Please present my thankful acknowledgement to Mr Adlum for his valuable present. I am not certain whether the word Native means, that it is made of American Grapes or of foreign Grapes planted here; but in either case it proves that the wine is made of...
Your letter of the 5th November gave us all great pleasure and certainly none more than me. I was delighted to hear that you had such good company from Boston to Newport and from thence on the Steamboat to New York, a circumstance which takes away the unpleasantness both of journeys & voyages, nor was I less gratified to hear of your safe arrival at Cedar Grove, and that you found your dear...
Your No 42 has given me pleasure like the rest. I ought to thank you for your assiduity in giving me kind entertainment in so great a number of letters. As you have all the Newspapers, you have all the news that we have and more. New England has settled down in calm satisfaction with her own vote. The circumstance you mentioned of Quincy & Braintree and their unanimnity has delighted me as...
I was made very happy by your letter, from New York 20th: September. I regretted your short visit but I was highly delighted with it, and wished it was much longer. A visit at my age from such a friend is a memorable epocha in my poor history. I thank you for introducing to me that excellent gentleman, Mr Huger. I find him an intelligent, amiable gentleman as any I have seen. I was delighted...
Common civility would have required that I should have answered your letter of the 6th. month long before this time, but the approach & invasion of my ninetieth year has taken away my faculties to such a degree that I have not been able to observe the common rule of my correspondents. Your Gazette of New York is an excellent work & will be extremely useful to that State for many centuries to...
The formidable invasion of my ninetieth year must be my apology for neglecting, and so improperly, your valuable and worthy present of “A System of Universal Science”; but the loss of my sight prevents my making the use of it I wish. It is a work of great labour and research, and must be useful to those who wish to inquire into that subject. I also thank you for the newspapers you sent me. I...
The bearer of this letter is a gentleman of eminent literary character in this State & as a Professor in our University at Cambridge. His manners and graces have recommended him to all who have been acquainted with him I believe. I know of no exception. He and his lady are desirous of seeing all the great men of the south and I am sure it will gratify both him and his wife to carry a letter to...
Your friend Professor Ticknor is bound upon a Tour in Virginia, though he needs no introduction to you he has requested a letter from me, and I cannot deny him, he carries his Lady with him; who is rich enough, and handsome enough, & amiable enough, And what can one say more— Is the present calm in the Political World to continue long or not? Our controversy will all be settled in a short...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor and his Lady. This Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge, and one of the most conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson, and is highly esteemed by him. I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison he proposes to visit Montpelier as well as Montecello in the...
Your friend Professor Ticknor is bound upon a Tour in Virginia, though he needs no introduction to you he has requested a letter from me, and I cannot deny him,—he carries his Lady with him; who is rich enough, and handsome enough, & amiable enough; And what can we say more— Is the present calm in the Political World to continue long or not? Our controversy will be settled in a short time, and...
Your frolicsome letter of the 10th of October has come to hand this morning and amidst the sinking and fainting infirmities of age has given me a temporary flash of spirits and has tirminated in the solid comfort of the arrival of your father and Mother and Miss Mary at Washington after tot et tanta discrimina rerum. The ladies must have had a severe trial your Mother is so much in the habit...
By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangements for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his Services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gratifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangement s for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gartifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
I have had read to me, your valuable Journal of your Campaigns in the American revolutionary war, and I have no hesitation in saying, that it is the most natural, simple, and faithful narration of facts, that I have seen in any history of that period. It preserves the memory of many men, & many facts, of which I was wholly ignorant until I heard that book read to me, particularly the conduct &...
I send this letter by my two grandsons, George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams to congratulate you on your happy arrival in your country after so long an absence. There is not a man in America who more sincerely rejoices in your happiness and in the burst of joy which your presence has diffused through this whole continent than myself. I would wait upon you in person but the total...
I ought to have answered your kind letter of the 23d July—before now, but decrepitude and imbecility cannot do what it wishes. I cannot read, & I cannot search for the Resolutions you speak of— It is in vain to enquire, who, moved this or that resolution you may depend upon it that the movers of the greatest resolution in Congress were not the Authors of them—I will not tell you who were the...
I am very glad you have employed your leisure houres, in so honorable & useful a service, as the composition of you r great work on the Criminal code—I pray you to make what use you please of my name & especially to place it among your subscribers for its publication—If I was a Man of fortune I would publish it myself & place it in a conspicious view in Our Quincy Library—We have lived...
Mr Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...
Mr Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of my old friend Mr Brackett, who is advancing with me far in our eighty ninth year, is desirous of an introduction to you. I hope your family will receive him with kindness. He seems to have a passion for seeing conspicuous characters, and I hope he will be gratified. He can inform you how faint and feeble I am, and how ardently I wish to see you and...
I still breathe in great weakness, but in my latest breath I shall wish for your health and prosperity and that of all your family. As to giving you advice concerning your concerns at Harvard University—I am utterly incapable of it. The conduct of that beloved and venerated Seminary is too refined and sublime for my dullness to comprehend. I presume not to censure any of its acts, though some...
M r Benjamin Parker Richardson, a Grandson of a neighbour of mine, who has lived in harmony with me for almost eighty nine years, is very desirous of seeing the venerable Author of the Declaration of Independence, and as this is a virtuous curiosity which I always applaud and encourage in our young men, I have ventured to give him a line of introduction to you. A freedom which I have taken too...