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Your kind Letters of Nov. 2. and Dec r 20 are before me. You will Soon learn the meaning of the Word Ennui, among others in the French Language, which have no parallel Expression in English. I Suffered more from this Dæmon in Europe than I can express; more for what I know than from all the other Pains of my whole Life. had I not found in Books a relief from it, I should have perished under...
I have received your Letters Numbers 1. 2. 3. 4. and 5. but not in the order, in which they were written— Number one, was the last rec d as it came to hand by the last Post. Never was a Father more Satisfied, or gratified, than I have been with the kind Attention of my sons Since they went abroad. I have no Language to express to you the Pleasure I have rec d from the Satisfaction you have...
3[September 1796] (Adams Papers)
The Summer is ended and the first day of Autumn commenced. The Morning is cold tho the Wind is West. To Work again on the high Ways. Billings out upon his Wall a little after Sunrise. Captn. Hall Surveyor of High Ways finished the Road between my Garden and new Wall. To work again on the high Ways. They have taxed me this Year between forty nine and fifty days Works on the Roads besides the...
I have received your favour of the 22.—Mrs Adams, Mr Charles and Miss Lousia, arrived on Wednesday the 24th after a tedious Passage of five days from Newport. We are all very happy. Mr Samuel Tufts needs no other merit but that of being your Brother, to convince me that he has a great deal: but if he is a Candidate for any Employment he must apply directly to the first Magistrate. The...
Your polite and obliging Favour of April the 10th I duely received at this Place and I pray you to accept of my best Thanks for your very elegant and acceptable Present of a Print of the Death of Lord Chatham, a Masterpiece of the Fine Arts which does as much honour to America which produced the Artist as it does to great Britain which produced the Statesman. Nor am I less Sensible of the...
I am not surprized at your Anxiety expressed in your Letter of the 25 th. which I rec d Yesterday. The Conduct of certain Mules has been so gloomy and obstinate for five Months past as to threaten the most dangerous Effects. The Proceedings of Boston N. York & Philadelphia now compared with their intemperate folly last July or August is a curious Specimen of Negotians with foreign Courts &...
M r Richard Cooke of Mary land will tell you all the News— I expect to sign the Bills this day which were all passed Yesterday for carrying into E xn. the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and the Indians— Yesterday seemed a Day of Universal and perpetual Peace foreign & domestic. Tomorrow I go home— Congress will rise by the 20 th. There is much Talk of the Resignation of the P. a...
I received with great Pleasure your Letter of the 9 of August, inclosing a Receipt from Mr Parsons for one hundred Pounds lawful Money, which you paid him in the month of August, Second day, in full for your Tuition as a Clerk in his office for the term of three Years. I learned, with Pleasure also, that on the 9 th of August you took Possession of an office in my house, where I wish you more...
I have all along flattered myself with hopes that I might with Propriety have taken Leave of the Senate and returned home, as soon as the Roads might be settled: But such is the critical State of our public Affairs, and I daily hear Such Doctrines Advanced, and Supported by almost and sometimes quite one half of the Senate, that I shall not prevail on myself to abandon my Post. This Day the...
I have great Satisfaction in your Letter of the 10 th. The Breaking of the Bubble of Banks would be a Blessing if it could teach our People to beware of all other Bubbles. But I fear We shall have a Succession of them. I hope however at least they will teach you caution. “The Rivalries of our most conspicuous Characters” are such as human Nature produces under the Cultivation of such a...
This Morning I received your favour of the 21 st. of January. I am Sure your People do a great deal of Work, So dont be concern’d— I am very well Satisfied with your Agricultural Diary. The venerable Governor made the best Speech he ever made—but the old Leaven ferments a little in it.— I wonder you had not rec d two Letters from Thomas which I inclosed to you. I now inclose you one from M r...
I wrote you before to day: but I forgot to say Several Things.— Have you ever attended a Town Meeting? You may there learn the Ways of Men, and penetrate Several Characters which otherwise You would not know. There are Several Objects of Enquiry, which I would point out to your consideration without making any noise or parade about them. 1. The State of Parties in Religion, Government Manners,...
13Quincy July 12. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Yesterday mow’d all the Grass on Stony field Hill. To day ploughing for Hilling among the Corn over against the House. Brisler laying the foundation of the new Barn which is to be rais’d tomorrow, at the East End of my Fathers barn. Puffer and Sullivan Lathrop ploughing among Potatoes in the lower Garden. This Journal is commenced, to allure me into the habit of Writing again, long lost. This...
The Judges are now here— Judge Cushing is under the Hands of D r Tate who is Said to have wrought many Cures of Cancers and particularly one for the President. The Judge appears to be under serious apprehensions for something in his Lip which he thinks is a Cancer but his hopes from Tates Prescriptions seem to be lively. M rs Washington is happy in the Company of her three Grand daughters, the...
I take the opportunity by General Mansell to acknowledge the receipt of your polite letter of the 29 of May 1789 and to present you my thanks for the valuable present of your entertaining travels. Your compliments upon so hasty a production as my book are very flattering. It would give me pleasure to pursue the subject through all the known governments, and to correct or rather new make the...
On the 28th. Day of June 1786 Mr. Barclay concluded a Treaty with the Emperor of Morocco.— On the 1st and 25th. Days of January 1787 the said Treaty was conditionally ratified by Mr. Adams and Mr. Jefferson,—under whose Direction the Negociations for it were placed by Congress, and conducted by Mr. Barclay.— On the 18th. Day of July 1787 the said Treaty was finally ratified by Congress.— On...
Last night I received your favour of the 4th. and am much obliged by your Account of Affairs in this as well as in the Letter you wrote the Week before which I have also received. Mrs Adams joins me in friendly regards to Mrs Knox and yourself. We are very Sorry for any unpleasant Circumstances you have found at Bush Hill: and very happy that it happened to be in our Power to accommodate your...
The Vice President of the United States, presents his compliments to Governour Miflin, & informs him, that the President of the United States has signified his pleasure to meet Congress in the Senate Chamber, to morrow at 12. O’Clock, and that a Seat is ordered for Governour Miflin if it should be agreeable to him to be present— PHi : Society Collection.
I have received your favour of the 30th. of November and transmitted to Dr Belknap as you desire the Papers enclosed. The Utensils and ornaments represented in the Drawings are great Curiosities, and Seem to shew more skill in Art, than any of the native Indians, at this day are possessed of. I am not enough in the habit of Antiquarian Speculations to hazard any Conjectures concerning them. I...
I am returned to my yearly servitude, and have began to drudge for the winter, if not for both winter and spring. I should long since have been weary of this laborious course, if, insignificant as my office appears, it had not been manifest upon several occasions, that some of the greatest questions upon the Constitution, as well as the great point of war or peace, had depended upon my...
Your favour of the 19 of March deserves a particular consideration and answer, which I have not, till now, been able, from a multitude of avocations some frivolous yet indispensable, others of more consequence, to give it. The Influence which you Suppose I may have as President of the Senate, will be found to be very little, if any at all. you Say the Eastern States must not be Suspected: but...
I have this moment rec d your favour of 25. April.— If you want more Money before June borrow it of the General whom I will repay when I return. The freight of the furniture was in Mass. L. M.— The Farm goes on admirably well— I am well Satisfied with all you do. The Weather is terribly hot and dry for the season. Yet the Country looks charmingly. I hope to be at home by the first of June....
I thank you for your kind letter of the tenth of this month. Mr. G. may well be shocked at the Message. It is a thunderbolt. I cannot but feel something like an apology for him, as he was led into some of his enterprises by the imprudence of our fellow-citizens. The extravagant court paid to him by a party, was enough to turn a weak head. The enthusiasm and delirium of that party has involved...
The Senate are now in Possession of the Budget.— It is a Bone to gnaw for The Aristocrats as well as the Democrats: And while I am employed in attending the Digestion of it, I send you enclosed an Amusement which resembles it only in name. I can form no Judgment when the Proscess will be over. We must wait with Patience. I dined yesterday in the Family Way with The President— He told me that...
25August 26. 1796. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Cloudy. Wind. N.E. but not rainy. The shower last night has refreshed Us. The Corn, the Gardens, the Pastures, The After feed, the Fruit trees all feel it. Sullivan gone for a Load of Seaweed. The other Men upon the Wall. In digging a Trench for the Wall We find Stones enough, in Addition to the old Wall to compleat the New one. Four hands with a Yoke of Oxen have done Six Rods in four days...
26August 30. Tuesday. 1796. (Adams Papers)
Prospect of another hot day. Pursuing the Wall. Tirrell worked with our Men. Trask cutting Bushes on the ploughed Meadow at the other Place. Wind shifted to the North and then to the N.E. and the Air became very cold. Rode up to see Trask. Carted Mould into the Yard all Day.
I have rec d from you one Letter and no more Since I left N. York. Your Electors appear like a large black Spot in a bright Circle of Unanimity which extends from N. H. to Maryland inclusively. Then the Region of Darkness begins again and extends I know not how far. A decided Reprehension from N. York and Virginia would very Sensibly affect me, if there were not most unequivocal Marks of a...
Our Patriots are so anxious lest Aristocracy should take root, that I wonder they do not eradicate all the seeds of it. instead of Addressing M r Speaker, they should address Freddy Mulenbourg— instead of talking of the Gentleman from Virginia they should quote Billy Giles &c &c &c The Purity of this Symplicity has always appeared among Insurgents. In Chaises and Bradfords Patriotick Efforts I...
The Mail of Yesterday brought me, a rich Treasure in your kind Letters of the 18. 24 and 25 th of January— Ice in the Rivers or Snow or some other Obstructions on the Roads have delay’d the Conveyance of some of them and occasioned their Arrival all together. Columbus and Barneveld were both written with Elegance and Spirit and the poor Wretches who so justly fell under their Lashes were never...
I have recd all your Letters, and the Post Office is very faithful. The Heat has been excessive and my daily Toil Somewhat exhausting besides a very extensive Correspondence, without a Clerk. Pray let Mr Cranch if he will be so good look over the account, as he did formerly. Have you read Ned Church’s fragment.? What Passion, or what Principle, could put it into that fellows head? I never...