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Draught of a treaty of Amity & Commerce between her most faithful Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarva’s and the United States of America— The Parties being willing to fix in a permanent & equitable manner the rules to be observed in the Commerce they desire to establish between their respective Countries, have judged that the said end cannot be better obtained than by taking the most...
Art. XI. 2 + There shall be, a full and entire Liberty of Conscience allowed, to the Inhabitants and Subjects of each Party and no one Shall be molested, in regard to his Worship, provided he Submits, as to the public Demonstration of it, to the Laws of the Country. There Shall be given moreover Liberty when any Subjects or Inhabitants of either Party, Shall die in the Territory of the other,...
And it is further specially agreed that except the liberty of introducing woollens into the kingdom of Portugal which has been ceded to certain nations in compensation for their privileges yeilded on their grant to the commerce of Portugal, shall not be understood to be communicated to the citizens of the U. S. by this or any other article of the present treaty. which is the effect of a...
Observations Sur le Traité D’Amitie et de Commerce. N. 1 ere. We must conform ourselves, as to the Titles to the following Rule “between her most faithfull Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarves”. &c Art. I. N. 2 We must observe in this Article the Same Rule, above established. The Rest will meet with no Difficulty. Art. II. N. 3. The same Observation, in the words underscored. it...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
We have received from Congress a Resolution by which We are to be impowered to negotiate a Treaty of Commerce with G. B. My self Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay. This will detain me in Europe this Winter. If this Letter arrives in Season, that you can come to me this Fall with Miss Nabby, I shall be Supreamly happy to see you. But Still Things are so unsettled in Congress that you may expect to...
I have past through the Ceremonies of taking Leave of the States General, the Prince and Princess &c to the Satisfaction of all Parties—and have been feasted at Court, and all that.— made my Compliments to the Prince on the 8. of March his Birth Day, and to the Princess at her Drawing Room &c &c &c. and should have been in London at this hour if you had not have laid a Plott, which has brought...
Your Letter of the 23d. has made me the happiest Man upon Earth. I am twenty Years younger than I was Yesterday. It is a cruel Mortification to me that I cannot go to meet you in London, but there are a Variety of Reasons decisive against it, which I will communicate to you here. Meantime, I Send you a son who is the greatest Traveller, of his Age, and without Partiality, I think as promising...
I have had another Fever, which brought me low, but as it has carried off certain Pains and Lamenesses the Relicks of the Amsterdam Distemper, I am perswaded it will do me, much good. I am going next Week to London, with my son. I may Stay Six Weeks, if nothing from Congress calls me away Sooner. I have only to repeat my earnest Request that you and our Daughter would come to me, as soon as...
Before this time I hope you have the Happiness to See your Daughter out of all Danger and your Son in Law and your two grand children in perfect health. I have no Letter from you, Since that you wrote at Hartford, and I cannot find fault because this is the first I have written to you. We are all very well, and go on very well. Charles came home and Thomas went to Haverhill, last Week.— We are...