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I have filled the Blanks as you desired and see no Objections to the rest. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
A brief investigation of the Question “ Was France or England the first beginner of the measures pursued since 1792, to spoliate the commerce of the United States . It has been asserted, and, by many, believed, “ that the Government of France has an indisputable title to the culpable pre-eminence of having taken the lead in the violation of neutral rights, the first instance on the part of the...
Guadaloupe Station S. Domingo Station President Truxtun } Congress Sever Philadelphia. Decatur Adams: Robinson New York Morris Augusta Mc.Elroy John Adams. Cross Richmond. Law Merrimack.
officers for the Baltimore to receive their Commissions and Warrants— Jonas M Speake – Lieutt. John West – Do. Thomas Rowland – Surgeon Henry Wells – Do. Mate Solomon Hotchkiss – Sails. Master Solomon Dickinson – Burser Peter Clopper – Sailmaker Horace Smyth – Midshipman Stanton Hazard – Do. John Gault – Do.— These Officers were appointed in July last, but not commissioned & no Commissions...
Be it known, That leave and permission, are hereby given to master or commander of the called of the burthen of tons or thereabouts, lying at present in the port of bound for and laden with to depart and proceed with his said on his said voyage, such having been visited, and the said having made oath before the proper officer , that the said belongs to one or more of the citizens of the United...
The President of the United States, requests The Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury, The Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States to take into their Consideration and Make reports of their Opinions in writing 1st. Whether the refusal to receive Mr Pinckney and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the territory of the republic with such circumstances of...
7Prescription, March 1797 (Adams Papers)
R x . Muriat: Hydrargyr Эi. = 1 Scruple = 20 grains Cream. Tartar. Эii. = 2 Scruples = 40 grains. Dissolve in one Pound of Soft Water or Rosewater. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
When, in early times it was first perceived; in early times that no middle course remained for America remained; between unlimited submission to a foreign Legislature, and a total Independence of its claims: men of reflection, were less apprehensive of danger, from the formidable Power of fleets and Armies they must determine to resist; than from those Contests and dissentions, which would...
your dearest Friend never had a more trying day than Yesterday. A Solenm Scene it was indeed and it was made more affecting to me, by the Presence of the General, whose Countenance was as serene and unclouded as the day. He Seem’d to me to enjoy a Tryumph over me. Methought I heard him think Ay! I am fairly out and you fairly in! see which of Us will be happiest. When the Ceremony was over he...
10Memorandum, 8 March 1797 (Adams Papers)
drew an order for 2000 Dollars Warrant issud Same day. I indorsed it the 9th. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have no Letter this Week and begin to fear that your Respect to our late P. has laid a foundation for a Sick Spring and Summer. Sometimes too I am jealous of unfair Play in the Post office to prevent me from hearing from you at the most critical Period of my Life. The public Papers must give you an Account of Proceedings, which I am wholly unable to describe. What Judgment is form’d of my...
Yesterday only I rec d yours of March 1.— am surprized you should have rec d none from me from 11. Feb. I have written never less than once a Week, seldom less than twice and 9 Weeks out of 10, three times, ever Since I left you. The Roads or some irregularity of the Post must have occasioned your disappointment. I hope you will obtain Mr Mears, but I must leave every Thing to you— The Load of...
I am So constantly engaged in Business most of which is new to me, that it Seems as if it was impossible to find time to write even to you— Yet I believe I write every Post. It proves to be a tedious Business to clear the Presidents house for me. I am now told it will not be ready this Week. You will See by the Gazette how the new Pensilvania House is disposed of. The Weather is bad— I have a...
I have received the Letter you did me, the honour to write me this morning informing me, that you have important Things to communicate to me, and requesting an hour for an interview;—Tomorrow morning at ten OClock I shall be glad to receive you; meantime I have the honour to be with great consideration / your most Obedient and most humble / Servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
A few days ago I received your obliging Letter of the 13th of February— It would be a greater pleasure to me, than any that I shall enjoy, unless the times should be better, than my apprehensions to Cultivate the Oats, you have been So polite to send me, But the four Acres of Cincinnatus must be this year unplouged, if some other person will not attend to them. If I am not mistaken you...
The President of the United States, requests the Secretary at War to take into his consideration the following Questions and make report of his opinion in Writing. 1. Whether the Refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republick, with such Circumstances of Indignity, Insult and Hostility as We have been inform’d of, are bar’s to all further...
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of State to take into his Consideration, the following Questions, and make report of his Opinion in writing. 1. Whether the refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney, and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republic, with Such circumstances of Indignity, Insult and Hostility, as we have been informed of are Bars to all further...
I have yours of the 6 th. by the Post of this day. I have proposed to Brisler to give him 300 dollars and pay the Expences of his Wife and Children to this Place and back again to Quincy, when they return— And He and his Wife and Children are to live in the Family. This is pretty well— I must and will have him. I am peremptorily for excluding all blacks and Molattoes. I hope to get into the...
I have received with Pleasure your polite Letter of the 5th. and thank you for your kind Compliments. I am very much disposed to believe, that you have been misinformed concerning “Some very leading Characters in the State of N. york.” If they have been “disappointed” it has been in the Election of the V.P. not in mine: and that by no means on the Ground of “the known Independence of my mind”....
There are 3 Cases which may now be supposed. 1. Mr Pinckney may be recd and in a fair and honourable Train of Negotiation. 2. Mr Pinckney may be neither recd nor rejected, but kept in suspence. 3. Mr Pinckney may be rejected, with Circumstances of Indignity Insult and Hostility + Which will render it at least questionable whether any other diplomatic Measures can be adopted. 4. Mr Pinckney may...
The President of the United States requests The Secretary of State and the Attorney General to take into their Consideration the 3.ss of the 2d Article of the Constitution of the United States. “He (the President) shall from time to time give for Congress, information of the State of the Union and recommend to their consideration, such measures as he shall judge necessary and Expedient. He may...
I have received the Letter, you did me the honour to write me, on the 22d of this month. Your congratulations “on the preference given” by my fellow Citizens, in the Choice of the first Magistrate of the Union, and the Expressions of your Confidence are Very obliging. I am not apprized of any reasonable objection to the Measure Suggested, of offering Scites for houses to the Ministers of...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
I have received the Letter you did me, the honour to write me on the 22d. of this month. your congratulations, “on the preference given” by my Fellow Citizens, in the Choice of the first Magistrate of the Union, and the Expressions of your Confidence are very obliging. I am not apprized of any reasonable objection to the measure Suggested, of offering Scites for houses to the Ministers of...
I received with much pleasure your favor of the 19th. If I Should meet with any “roses” in my Path, I Shall thank you for your Congratulations, and when I set my foot on “Thorns” as I Certainly shall, I shall thank you Equally for your Condolence, But when you assure me that you “feel a Confidence in the Safety of our Political Bark” you give me much Comfort, and I pray you may not be...
I received with much Pleasure your favour of the 19th. If I should meet with any “Roses,” in my Path, I shall thank you for your congratulations, and when I set my foot on “thorns” as I certainly shall, I will thank you equally for your condolence. But when you assure me that you “feel a confidence in the safety of our political Bark,” you give me much comfort, and I pray you may not be...
M r Murray of Maryland, your old Friend, with whom you form’d your first acquaintance at the Hague is to Succeed you. That Gentleman has been So long a Member of Congress and has given Such Proofs of Talents, amiable dispositions, and patriotic Sentiments, as qualify him to do honour to the Mission, as well as to his Predecessor. It would have been enough to have Said that he is well chosen to...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...