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I received this morning your Letter from Wilmington, delighted to learn that you had got well on thus far—I send this to catch you at New-York—We are all as comfortably well as we can be without you—Antoine seems pretty well recovered. I got a Letter from W. S. Smith off Cape Henry, dated the 8th. Catherine had had a spice of Sea Sickness and got over it—W. D. Robinson by missing time had...
Mr: Nichols who gave the promissary note of which I now enclose the duplicate saild in the Chauncy from Ostend for Newyork on the first of this month—By the same Vessel I wrote you a Letter of which the within is a copy, and conformably to which I wish you to obtain payment and so dispose of the money. I retain the triplicate in my own hand, of the note, and request you to give me notice as...
We arrived on Wednesday Evening at Boston, and yesterday Morning came out here. The weather until last Evening was the very extremity of the Season, but has now turned cool—All here are well—George came out with us from Boston—You have doubtless received the Letters from Mr Quincy and from George, written after my fathers decease, and have seen the copy of my father’s will—I propose to accept...
Your two Letters of Journal from New-York were duly received and afforded me much amusement—The illness of the Coachman came so mal àpropos, that I believe you determined upon the best thing that could be done, including to go in a Packet to Providence—I hope you have long before this safely arrived at Quincy, and that the health of all has been recruited by the Journey. Among the Strangers...
I came yesterday as far as Boston with Sister Lucy, who is employ’d in fixing me off: I came here in the afternoon finally to settle. Your Brother goe to Boston this morning, and I have but a few minutes to write. All at Braintree are well, Mr. Tyler’s Windmill is to be raised this day. There’s another thing, that you would never let me know. I have got a number of articles of impeachment,...
9 May 1801, Berlin. No. 192. Reports having had audience with king on 5 May, when he delivered his letter of recall and took leave. “I assured him according to my instructions of the sincere wishes of the American government that the friendship and harmony subsisting between the two Nations might be continued; and he directed me to transmit the assurances of the same disposition on his part,...
The delays in the receipt of my letters, of which you complain are occasioned sometimes by a delay in sending them to the Post-Office, and sometimes must be accounted for by the Post-Office itself—I have oftentimes suffered the same impatience to hear from you, and last evening after having been nearly a fortnight without a line from you, received together your kind letters of the 13th: and...
I have received your Letter of the 11th. and your mother has that of the 16th. from Paris. I wrote you by Mr Boyle, and have not written since, supposing a Letter could not reach Paris before you would have left it.—We shall from this day be constantly expecting your return, and I write this merely with the chance of its finding you at Bruxelles. We are preparing with all possible despatch to...
Two months having elapsed since I made the proposal respecting the note of hand due from your brother Justus to me, and being still without an answer from him, I presume either that the proposal was not agreeable to him, or that some accident has delayed or misdirected his answer, and prevented its coming to hand. I have now settled once more in this town, and resumed the practice of the...
I have to offer you my best acknowledgments for your obliging attention to my demands before the Commissioners of Bankruptcy, against Bird, Savage and Bird—If the demand of the United States has a preference to all others I am afraid the Government will not readily charge themselves with mine—I am however much obliged to you for the hint; of which I shall avail myself if it can be done with...
Mess rs: Moliere, will this day extend your credit with their correspondent at Paris, to the amount of 4000 livres more. This I presume will amply suffice for your occasions. I requested you by my last letter, to be here not later than the 25 th: of this month. There is to be a Ball on that day at the Hotel de Suéde. The Count desires me to tell you, that you will be very much wanted as a...
I presume you had not left Bristol two hours before we arrived there—Your advice to us to stop at the Fox-Chace, we could not follow—For we should not have known how to get forward—Neither can we go into the City, because, if we did they would exclude us from Baltimore.—We are now at Dover’s—The Rising Sun, close by the Bridge—We shall stop here to-morrow, and proceed on Monday—We hope you...
I wrote you on Sunday, and the same Evening I received yours of 26. Feby:—Yesterday yours of the 1st: instt: came to hand—I rejoice to learn that the children are at length perfectly well; and Kitty continues to be admired. I shall be very well satisfied to part with Mr: Gurney as a Tenant, and if he can give me any good security for the payment of his rent, I shall very willingly take it. I...
In fulfilment of my promise on parting from you, I have the pleasure to inform you of our safe arrival here; my own health being good; and that of Mrs. Adams, I hope, improved by her excursion. Elizabeth Adams stopped, and remains for some days at Baltimore. I overtook General La Fayette at Philadelphia, and spent four days there, much in company with him. I met him again at Frenchtown, and...
The quiet Season has at length arrived. For the last six weeks I have had no occasion to go into London, except upon business, and there is some relaxation of that—Almost all the Cabinet Ministers are absent upon excursions; and Lord Castlereagh is gone to Ireland to see his father . The Morning Chronicle gives a shrewd hint, that it is the sign that Parliament will be dissolved, and that his...
Without an extraordinary portion of incredulity, I might still dispute, the full confirmation of your news, as the whole of the Brest squadron, was not taken by Sir J. B Warren, and we are yet quite uncertain here what part of it really fell into his hands—But I had rather beleive in the official confirmation of the reports announcing the destruction of the transports at Alexandria, though it...
I have received your letter of the 18th. instt. and think you cannot do better, than invest your money in the manner proposed by Mr. Johnson; advising you only to take such security for the payment of principal and interest, as will be satisfactory to you—The best I believe, is a mortgage upon amply equivalent Real Estate— To enable you to make the investment without loss of time I have...
House in F. Street—Washington Deeds. 1. Nicholas Voss to Andrew & George Way. Lot n. 8. Square 253. 25. Jany. 1813. Liber A–E. N: 30. Fo. 150. 151. 152. Recites Lease from J. Templeman to Voss. 30. June 1802. Recorded Book H. n. 8. folio 342—for $110 ground rent renewable forever. Voss assigns the Lease to A & G. Way as Tenants in Common—for $3700. 2. Thomas Campbell Cox and Susan Mason Cox,...
I have received with deep sensibility, the copy which the City Council of Charleston, have been pleased to present, and which you have had the goodness to forward to me, of the Eulogy of Mr Ford, delivered at the request of the council, upon the character of my deceased father The respectful attention thus shewn to the memory, of the friend and associate in Revolutionary trials of Christopher...
28 March 1801, Berlin. No. 187. Encloses copy of Spanish declaration of war on Portugal. Reports thirty-day truce between France and Naples, the terms of which include an embargo on British ships in port of Naples. Expects general European war against Britain. Notes that Nelson has sailed for Copenhagen, that a British refusal to lift embargo of Swedish and Danish ships effectively answers...
I returned too late in the evening: from Potsdam, to send the enclosed letter for you by the last post but I hope it will not be the longer delayed in its departure for waiting untill this day. The other is the 5th: upon a work the examination of which I have not yet finished, and which I must for the present suspend. My wife is yet very slowly recovering but not yet able to sit up. I shall...
I have not yet had the pleasure of receiving a line from you, which I presume is owing to the multiplicity of your occupations—I have had one letter from my Mother containing the information concerning which we were so anxious, of our children’s health. The Good-Intent has not yet arrived though I observe by a Newspaper that she cleared out from Boston about the 24th: of October—We are in...
I have just received your’s of the 29th: of last month; since which I hope you have two from me—I feel the same anxiety to hear from you frequently which you mention, and grow uneasy, whenever four or five days pass without a letter—I rejoyce to learn that you and the children are in health; and sincerely sympathize in the distressing affliction, which has befallen Harriet.—The consolations...
I wrote you on the 25 of October & 29 of Dec r: 1796. & on the 14 th: of May & 1 st: of August of the last year. All these letters excepting that of 14 May, related to my affairs in your hands.— I have never received any answer whatever to either of them. That of 29 Dec r: I think must have miscarried, but I have long since received answers from other persons, to letters which went by the same...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your kind Letters of 22. March. and 7. April; and at the same time my wife and children all received the like tokens of your affectionate remembrance. The last is to Mr J. A. Smith of 13 April.—They ought all, and I hope will answer you more at length, than it is in my power to do. For the last six weeks, besides the pressure of my correspondence, which is...
Last friday Evening, the 25th. Whitcomb to my great joy arrived and brought the tidings of your safe arrival at Washington; he was detained four days at New-York; so that your letter of the 16th. reached me at the same time—I enjoyed over again the happiness of your meeting with your parents and family; and as you are apprehensive of too much inconvenience on your journey hither without me, I...
18 April 1801, Berlin. No. 190. Answers query of 28 Dec. 1800 concerning whereabouts of an American citizen, Lewis Littlepage, who plans soon to embark for home. Reports that all recent Prussian trade restrictions now are lifted, that British and Danes signed fourteen-week armistice on 8 Apr., and that Denmark is forced to suspend its membership in armed league and to make no changes in its...
Since I wrote you last I have been a little affected with the rhumatism in my shoulder, so that I did not attend at Mrs: Erskine’s Ball—I had also something of a cold, and was disinclined to be out so late at Night as a Ball necessarily imports—Your Mamma and the Girls were there: the company was numerous and the party very agreeable. We have this day received a Message from the President,...
Yesterday I received your Journal to the 27th. and landing you at Quincy—It would have put me quite in Spirits, but for the concluding paragraph which is alarming—My intention is to leave this City the 20th. or 21st.—If my calculations are correct you may send the Carriage to take me up at Dedham about or a little before Sunset on Saturday the 25th.—If it does not find me there it may wait for...
The House of Bird, Savage and Bird have stop’d payment, and probably the bill I drew upon them which you negotiated last November, will come back protested—In that case, settle the amount to be paid, with the indorsee duly entitled to it, who may call upon you; let me know the amount and I will send you a post note for it—Be careful to see that the protest and proceedings have all been...