Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 11-20 of 309 sorted by editorial placement
You will receive enclosed with this, a duplicate of my letter, relative to your annual account, and a literary letter of this date, containing an account of an interview between Frederic 2. and the poet Gellert, which I hope will amuse you.—If you chuse, it may be published as one of the letters on various topics of foreign literature. At the same time with your accounts, I received a couple...
The gazette , of which you will find the first number enclosed, is intended to give you a concise & comprehensive view of the principal occurences in every part of Europe—My project is during the remainder of my stay here, to send you twice a month a similar sheet, comprizing a period of the same length of time. It will perhaps seldom give you news , but it will concentrate information, which...
You will remember, that in the year 1793, while the government of the french republic was in the hands of Robertspiere, a collection of papers, found among those of Louis the sixteenth was published under the title of Politics of all the cabinets of Europe . The most important of these papers, and that from which the title was given to the whole collection, was a work written by Mr. Favier, a...
You have here a triplicate of my letter respecting your account—a duplicate of the conversation between Frederic 2. & Gellert. And the first number of a series, in which I purpose to review an important late french work, which I shall send to your father. It seems to me as if the frequency of writing shortened the distance between us. But you will not complain if it likewise sometimes shortens...
I received a few days ago your kind letter of 29 January. After having been so many months without a line from you, it gave me sincere pleasure to see your hand-writing again, though I could not but sympathise with the afflictions under the immediate burden of which it was written—I have cordially and deeply lamented my poor brother, and will obey your injunction respecting his child. I learn...
I enclose herewith the second number of my Gazette, which completes the Journal for the month of March. By the last post I sent to Hamburg a letter for my mother, with the information that on the 12th: inst. my wife was delivered of a son. But she was then extremely ill, & I wrote under the impression of great alarm on her account. She has since very much recovered, & as I am assured quite out...
As Nancy has vindicated her privilege of giving you the first notice that you were a Grandmamma, I presume I have no occasion to scruple at letting you know that last Sunday the 12th: instt: at half-past three o’clock afternoon, our dear Louisa gave you another grandson—To have been able to add that both she and her child have been ever since as well as the occasion could admit, would perhaps...
Before I proceed to remark upon the particular causes alledged by the citizen Hauterive in his book upon the State of France at the end of the 8th: year, as having disorganized the public law of Europe, it is proper to observe, that one of the greatest apparent purposes of the work, is to hold out a lure of temptation to the Austrian cabinet . To superficial observation, this may appear to...
The papers enclosed, are 1. A press copy, of my letter to you dated 28: of last month, which I have hitherto neglected sending you—2. Do: of the Gazette N: 2. which I have sent to your father—This you will peruse and then forward to him—It will not do for publication—The plan I think might be improved so as to make it very useful, for communicating a concise view of European events—But as yet...
As I am informed there is a vessel soon to sail from Amsterdam for Boston I now forward to Mr. Bourne to go by her, this letter enclosing copies of my numbers 2 and 3. upon the Etat de la France &c. The book itself will go with the copy of my first letter concerning it, from Hamburg—Hauterive has generally been given out as its author; but Talleyrand himself is now understood to have had the...