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    • Adams, John Quincy
    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA …
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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You will perhaps be surprised, to see that in less than 8 hours I have come 9 ½ posts. But the Roads, as far as this place, are excellent, and the horses, exceeding sprightly, because, they have very little to do: I did not expect myself, to get to this place, to-night, when I left Auteuil, but my first horses served me much better than, I had hoped. I could have gone with ease, another post...
Our winds are now contrary, and as they changed with the moon they may be three weeks as they are; which would by no means be mon compte . I am not sorry however that they have come round, because, I shall not lose my Letters from Paris, which I should have regretted extremely, if I had been obliged to leave them. When I went to see Mr. Barclay yesterday, he told me to have my baggage carried...
You have doubtless received before this, my Letter by Mr. Barclay, and you will have my N:2 in a day or two. I address’d it under cover to Mr. Jefferson, in case it should arrive after your departure. The morning after the date of my last, our Captain, ordered me to go on board, and at about 10 o’clock we weigh’d our anchors and set sail, but before we could get clear of the Harbour, the wind...
I went on shore upon Long Island with our Captain, and visited Monsr. de Marbois, who has taken a house there for the summer. He received me with politeness, invited me to dine with him, and enquired concerning my father in as friendly a manner, as he could have done had he wish’d him well. Madame de Marbois, may be called a pretty, little woman. She was a quaker, but appears not to have...
In my last I just mentioned having been over upon Long Island, and paid a visit to Mrs. Smith, the Colls.s Mother: she was very polite to me, and appeared to miss her Son, much. All the family are in mourning for the old gentleman who died about 9 months ago. There is one Son here now, and if I mistake not, 6 daughters. Sally strikes most at first sight: she is tall; has a very fine shape, and...
Mr. Söderström, the Sweedish Consul, has been here about a fortnight. I went this morning about a mile out of town with him, and was introduced to a Mr. Bayard. He has two Daughters that are among the toasts; one of them I think very pretty. Mr. Bayard I hear was in the late war violent on the wrong side of the Question. It is the case with a great number, of the most reputable families in the...
This morning we left Hartford New Haven, accompanied by Mr. Broome, and Mr. Brush, who wishing to take a ride to Hartford, took this opportunity, which is a very agreeable Circumstance to us. We at first intended to have gone directly to Hartford this day. But as I had a Letter for Genl. Parsons, one of the aldermen of this City, and as we were told it was worth ou r while to us e this road,...
I came into Boston this morning, and shall probably spend the week here, in order to pay all my visits, and see all those persons, that it will be necessary to show myself to. Stopping at Milton, I was very much surprized, when Mrs. Warren inform’d me, that Mr. Otis shut up last Saturday Evening: had the news come from any other Person, I should not at that time have believ’d it, for I was...
All this day has been employ’d in answering Questions respecting you, and all is not over yet. I must mention one Circumstance, although it may appear too trifling. You may Remember, that in your Letters by me, you gave an Account of the Ceremony at Nôtre Dame. All the family, were very much entertained, by your Relation, but there was a Question arose to day, what, the Ring was. One supposed...
I have been in a manner cheated out of this day by the library; for in looking over the books, and sometimes dipping into one, the fleeting hours (as the poets say) have disappeared; and night in her sable chariot, has performed a considerable part of her course. Your Uncle, went this morning to Boston, as he regularly does, and Mr. Tyler, has been very closely engaged all day. In the...