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My Father has desired me to request you to send on with his law books a large Ainsworths Latin Dictionary and a copy of Adam’s Roman Antiquities both which are somewhere among his books at the Atheneum I am my dear sir / respectfully yours. P.S. This is written in a hurry I shall soon write you a letter. I will trouble you to hand the enclosed paper to Mr Benjamin Joy and to tell him that I...
I am directed by my Father to inform you that he has received your letter with the Bill of lading of the books embarked on board the Ocean for Alexandria but is prevented by multiplied avocations from answering it himself. He desires me to express to you his thanks and I pray you to accept mine for your kindness in transmitting the resolution of the Suffolk Bar on the subject of his...
For your favour of the 23rd October I am greatly indebted; it should have been acknowledged before were it not that subjects are constantly accumulating in which we are led to apply to you and I thought it better to delay for a short time the answer to your letter in order to take an opportunity at the same time reluctantly to trouble you with some request or other. Such an opportunity has...
I am directed by my Father to congratulate you upon the handsome acquisition you have lately made for the purpose of establishing the Athenæum in a more convenient and appropriate position and to request of you the name of the munificent donor who is announced as having given you a building for the purpose. Pursuant to previous custom I have to request of you to ask Messr Wells and Lilly in my...
I am enabled to reply to your last favour somewhat earlier than to the two which preceded it and hope that as my large file of unanswered letters is at last wholly disposed of I shall have it in my power to keep pace with my correspondents in future. There are moments in the life of every man when it is exceedingly difficult to bend the attention to business and those who allot special hours...
It was painful to hear that you had been so ill after arriving at Washington and astonishing that people tell you you have changed for the worse. This is not a thing to mortify you as you have been always superior to dependence upon mere looks but it has always struck me as a disagreeable and not infrequently an ill natured remark to tell people that they have changed for the worse. It is...
Just this moment opening my shutters I find the ground covered with snow and it lays apparently somewhat deep. We have had a number of little drizzles as the parson called them but this is the first real snow storm of the season. Yesterday was very disagreeable: a very light snow was falling all day but not enough to accumulate much, and the air was exceedingly sharp and piercing. The...
I have received your journal for the two first days of this month and shall as you permit read parts of it to my Grandfather. He has consented to give me all your preceding journals which are to be delivered to me next week. He thinks this the most proper disposition which could be made of them as he does not wish them liable to any view but those which you may voluntarily grant. I shall...
It is pleasant to be able to inform you that Grandfathers health rather improves than declines. He has gone comfortably through the month of February and is now better than he has been for some time past. The family at Quincy are well. Mr Cutler, the Episcopal Clergyman there seems to have made sad havoc with poor Susans intellect. She is very enthusiastic and the religious fervor grows rather...
By Marys last letter I am told that you are still suffering from illness and Harriet Welsh understood from Mr Smith in New York that St Anthony had tormented you more than usually for some time. This disorder seems to have become very prevalent in this country and Mrs Welsh suffers so much from it that she is compelled to remain constantly at home. Grandfather had it pretty severely last...