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    • Adams, Abigail
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    • Adams, John Quincy
    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Mrs Hay call’d, and left me your Letter. tho I have not written to you before I have had you constantly upon my mind, and have been anxious for your Health. I have heard of you several times. I think you would mind an advantage in drinking valerian & camomile Tea, for those spasm’s you complain of. I am not able to say to you as yet, when I shall go to Newyork. I have received only one Letter...
I have sent you the Cloth the coat & Boots. the Glass I have not yet been able to find. inclosed is an other article the amount of what I engaged to you. The Horse I had engaged to keep for a Gentleman till Monday next, so that I could not without forfeiting my word let him go till twesday provided I should not sell him to him. I am sorry, for if I should not part with him then: I should not...
one would suppose that the waters between N york and Road Island had produced the same effect upon you, that the Poets feign of the River Lethe, not a Line, not a word from you since you quitted Richmond Hill. are you so wholy absorpd in the study of the Law of Nations as to forget those of Nature? I have been very sorry since you left us that your visit was made just at the period it was. a...
I believe this is your Birth day, may you have many returns of this Period, encreasing in wisdom knowledge wealth and happiness at every Aniversary. it is a long time since I wrote to you, yet I have not been unmindfull of you I am anxious for your welfare, and Solicitious for your success in Buisness. you must expect however to advance slowly at first and must call to your aid Patience and...
I congratulate you upon your having setled yourself thus far, and am pleasd to find you so well accommodated. you have a good office, a Good Library, and an agreable Family to reside in. be patient and persevering. you will get Buisness in time, and when you feel disposed to find fault with your stars, bethink yourself how preferable your situation to that of many others, and tho a state of...
yesterday mr Howard arrived here and brought me Letters from your Brother Thomas, and one from you to Charles— I was rejoiced to find that he was on his way here, as the delay had been the source of a good deal of uneasiness. I am fully of your mind with regard to Thomas, and know that if he studies Law it will be a force to his inclinations. the want of capital I Suppose is one great...
I received by your Brother on fryday last your kind Letter; he did not get here, oweing to contrary winds untill the tenth. he appears to think of the Law, but I fear it is rather from necessity than inclination, and because he finds that his Father is fond of having him study it, and that he does not See any opening in any other buisness. I shall be better able to judge when your Father...
perhaps a few lines from my own Hand may serve to put you more at your ease than an account of my Health from any other person. I have indeed had a very severe sickness in which both Body and mind sufferd, and the care which devolved upon me in consequence of my being in the midst of Removal I found too much for me. the least buisness put me into such a Tremour as would prevent my getting any...
I have received two Letters from you, since my arrival in this city. the sickness of your Brother Thomas must be my excuse for not sooner noticing the first, which I certainly should have done immediatly if your Father had not told me that he had written to you, and particularly answerd that part which proposed a visit to us. I certainly cannot have the least objection but should be most...
owing to an accident your Letter of April 1 t did not reach us till the 14 th I have got the power compleated and inclose it to the dr. I hope your trunk & the Porter which accompanied it came safe to Hand. I put in an article or two upon the top of the Trunk which if any opportunity offers you may send to Braintree. the Porter was directed to the care of mr Smith but I did not as I ought...