Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 51-100 of 114 sorted by recipient
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
I inclose to you a National song composed by this same mr Hopkinson. French Tunes have for a long time usurped an uncontrould sway. since the Change in the publick opinion respecting France, the people began to lose the relish for them, and What had been harmony, now becomes discord. accordingly their had been for several Evenings at the Theatre something like disorder, one party crying out...
yesterday dispatches were received from mr King up to the 9 th Jan’ ry in a postscrip he says, I have just learnt that mr Adams has been received by the new King notwithstanding his commission was to his Father. this is civil and will enable him to proceed with business— I received a Letter from dr Tufts yesterday that allarmd me. I thought I inclosed him some Bills. I might as I wrote you the...
I write you a few Lines this mor’g just to inclose to you the News paper of yesterday which contains an important Message from the President; it is a very painfull thing to him that he cannot communicate to the publick dispatches in which they are so much interested, but we have not any assurance that the Envoys have left Paris and who can say that in this critical state of things their...
I have just received yours of the 23 April and I sit down to answer your inquiries respecting the building I wrote to dr Tufts my Ideas upon it. I should think the East Chambers the best for a Library and I do not see any inconvenience from having the stairs to it without doors like going into a store as mr Tufts store is built. I pray neither the dr or mr Black when he comes will say any...
We left Philadelphia on Wedensday last, the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent, we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain, troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...
I received your Letter of June 13 th. and thank you for it. the account you give me respecting my House and the Farm are very pleasing. I like your proposal of going to it and taking tea with my good Neighbours very much— I am very sorry to hear that mrs Beal is so unwell. I have feard that she would fall into a decline, for she has appeard to me, to look very unwell for many Months. she was a...
I received yesterday your kind Letter of March 19 th . I expect a Letter every week if you have nothing else to say, but as Sterns observes, “how the Shadows Lengthen, as the sun declines” and this may be applied to the well as the natural System. as we descend the Hill of Life, our gay and vissonary prospect vanish, and what gilded our meridian days, our Zenith of Life, as the Shadows...
we reachd here yesterday being thursday the 7 th day from leaving home. we had very bad Roads, the Rains having washd all the stones bare, and the ruts were very deep I was much fatigued; Brisler and Family went on to N york mrs Brisler much mended in her Health by her journey. I hope when we get over our fatigue we shall all be able to say so. Betsy does not seem the worse for it, tho I think...
I write you a few lines this morning merely to inclose a Letter which I will thank you to cover and forward to Atkinson. I have not time to write this morning to Atkinson. inclosed I sent you a specimin of the Manners Religion & politeness of one of the 44 Gentlemen, Who can come and Eat of my Bread, & drink of my Wine one whom the Virginians consider as a Paragon of politeness whom they have...
I got through the 4 July with much more ease than I expected. it was a fine cool day, and my fatigue arose chiefly from being drest at an early hour, and receiving the very numerous Sets of company who were so polite as to pay their compliments to me in succession in my drawing Room after visiting the President below, and partaking of cake wine & punch with him. to my company were added the...
most cordially welcome to me was your kind Letter of May the 4 th , yet I have not found time since my arrival to thank you for it, or even to write a Line to any Friend. my Journey was as pleasent as my thoughts upon what was past, and my anticipations of what was to come would permit it to be. we reachd East Chester on thursday noon and found mrs smith and Children well. my reflections upon...
The eastern post will go out this morning and I take my pen to thank you for your Letters of the 20 & 26th of March. we had received intelligence of the wisdom of Roxbury & Milton, their petitions having reachd their Representitives in Congress. the reply to them may be found in the dispatches of our Envoys yesterday communicated to congress. The publick exegiency of our Country, and the real...
The senate on thursday voted to have the dispatches from our Envoys made publick, and orderd them Printed, but not the instructions. I hope however that those too, will be published; the People will then be convinced that every word Containd in the Presidents message of the 19 of march can be justified both by the instructions given, and by the dispatches received, and that what Jugartha said...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
I received your kind Letter of Feb’ ry 9th and was quite rejoic’d to hear that mrs Baxter was like to do well, when I feard to open the Letter least it should inform me of her death. I have been Confined with a cold like the influenza for several days past. I have dreaded least it should prove one of my Feb’ ry attacks. it came on with a very soar Throat and hoarsness and terminated in...
I keep up My old Habit of rising at an early hour. if I did not I should have little command of my Time at 5 I rise from that time till 8 I have a few leisure hours. at 8 I breakfast, after which untill Eleven I attend to my Family arrangements. at that hour I dress for the Day. from 12 untill two I receive company, sometimes untill 3. we dine at that hour unless on company days, which are...
I received on saturday Evening the 3 d March Your kind Letter of 25 Feb’ ry. You estimate much too highly the little services I am able to render to my Friends, and you depreciate the value of your own, the benifit of which I have too often experienced to Sit lightly by them, for whilst you visit the widow the orphan, the sick, and console them by your presense, enliven them by your...
By the post of yesterday I received yours of April 15 as the post will now go more frequently I hope you will get Letters more regularly It was very unfortunate for Mrs Porter, to have mr sole taken sick the very day after he came, and the more so because she is now encumberd with more buisness. I have written the dr. that I think it would be best to through two Chambers into one and to have...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
I received your Letter by this days post I began to be anxious to hear from my Friends at Quincy. I cannot but say that I was astonishd at some of its contents. I could not believe that any Gentleman would have had so little delicacy or so small a sense of propriety as to have written a more vague opinion, and that of a Lady too, to be read in a publick assembly as an authority. the Man must...
I yesterday about 11 oclock went into the Presidents Room to see if John had returnd from the post office. my good Gentleman was soberly Standing at the fire with your Letter open and very gravely reading it. I scolded and very soon carried it of. I thank you for all your communications. the P. says one of sister Cranchs Letters is worth half a dozen others. she allways tells us so much about...
I received your favour of June 26 th , and rejoice with you in the Birth of an other son, and in the safety and Health of Mrs Cranch, to whom be so kind as to present my Regards. I have shewn your Letter to the President, and he desires me to tell you, that he would not have you on any account, be the least detered from persueing any line of buisness which shall appear eligible to you, or to...
I received your Letter of July 12. I am inclined to think your last determination will prove a judicious one. I most sincerely hope it will. The President expects to leave this city next week. we shall go Northward for a Month or two. I could have wisht that my Health would have permitted me, to have visited the new city at this season; but the Heat is so great that I dare not make the...
After an absence of near four Months I returned, to this City the last week. I am disposed to renew my correspondence with you, if you can find leisure to attend it. The fraternal regard and affection which for many years subsisted between you and my sons is not lessned by time, or diminished by absence, but I trust has grown ripened, and matured by age, and like the Affection of your parents...
I had the pleasure of receiving from you a very excellent Letter last week, which fully proves that neither your Patriotism, or abilities have sufferd any elimination by your engagements in the ploding buisness of an accomptant, tho a course of years might have blunted the Edge of literary persuits, which are much better suited to your Education, taste and usefulness in Life. I rejoice...
I yesterday received your kind Letter of March 5 th and congratulate you and the Judge upon your safe arrival at N york. I assure you I was under serious apprehensions for your safety when I found you gone; I had sent Betsy to your Lodgings to inquire after your Health, a few moments after you were gone. I did not know how to credit it when she returnd with the News— I will not say, you took...
Your favour of June 19 th I duly received indisposition has prevented my replying to you before. the President regreets the feeble and infirm state of Health which prevents his old and tried Friend from the acceptance of an Embassy he was personally so well qualified for. it was with great apprehensions from that circumstance only, that he made the nomination and the critical state of the...
Blessed are the Peace makers, says [a Good] Book, for which you and I, entertain the highest respect and reverence. I quote this benidiction to reconcile you to the appointment of your Best Ffriend, as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republick. An appointment which all true Friends to their Country, and real Americans will rejoice in out of 28 Senators, there...
On 16 November 1797 the Philadelphia Aurora General Advertiser printed the following squib: “His serene highness of Braintree made an anti-climax on his journey from his dukedom. Boston made the cap of the climax, Philadelphia its tail. On another occasion it would be safer and wiser to make no further attempts at forcing respect; for it sits aukwardly upon men, that from respect it...
in Porcupines paper of last Evening I read a Letter Said to be Written by Mr Findley to his Friends in the Western Country. Is it to be wonderd at that the people are disunited in sentiment When such grose Misrepresentation are made them respecting the Veiws and designs of the Government, and its Representitives? it is rather a subject of surprize that So little Effect is produced by them. I...
Yesterday the secretary of state received Letters from mr Adams at Berlin dated Nov’ br 10 th & 17 th in which he says that he left Hamburgh on the 2d and reachd Berlin on the 7 th. he had an interveiw with the Minister. the King was informd of his arrival, and desired the Minister to express to him the extreem regreet he felt at not being able to give him Audience, as his dangerous illness...
I inclose to you a pamphlet, The correspondence between the Secretary of state, and the French Minister, for my son J Q Adams. if upon receiving it, you have reason to think he has allready had it; from any other hand, you will retain it, untill his arrival in England. William Vans Murray, of the state of Maryland, is appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to the Batavian Republick. This Gentleman...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
I wrote you on the 23 Jan’ ry. you have not received a Letter of that date, for a very good reason, that it still lies unfinishd in my desk, and now it is so much out of date that I do not think it worth sending. in it however I acknowledgd a Letter from you, and one for Mrs smith which I sent, also 2 Letters from the children all of which I forwarded to their Mamma. I have now the pleasure of...
I last Evening received your Letter of the 19 & 20 th Instant. I am most sincerely grieved for the melancholy situation of our Nephew, and the more so as it is not in my power to render him any personal assistance. Since my return from Haverhill I have thought it necessary to return the civilities received, which has obliged me to entertain weekly several sets of company and that with a Family...
I wrote to you from East Chester, but I believe I have not written to you from hence. I was dissapointed in not receiving a Letter by mr Bartlet from you, tho I was much pleased in learning that he brought Letters from you to mrs smith. Seperated as she is from all her connections except her little Girl, and living in a village where she has not any Society, communications by Letters are the...
I received your Letter of Jan’ry 23 d and was gratified to find your Hand writing improving. I know you are attentive to what is passing in the political World, indeed who can be an indifferent Spectator, in Times so critical, so allarming and so big with Concequences as the present? I send you a late publication under the signature of scipio, [ “ ]Reflections on Monroe’s view of the conduct...
I received by the last post your kind Letter and the Poem of Mrs Mortens which the President had received a few days before from the Author “For the beloved President of a Free and enlightned People, the following Poem is gratefully and Respectfully offerd, by the Author” I would fain flatter myself that the fair Authoriss did not take a poetic lisence in this sentance; I send you in return...
I received your two letters of April 5th and 7th, yesterday, and I enclosed you two from the children, in a letter to your brother this week, receiving them on that day; and not having time to write to you, before the post went. I do not think I have so frequently written to you for a month past, as I did through the winter; and it is because I have felt less anxious for you since the Col.’s...
I wrote you from East Chester and inclosed you 90 dollors to pay a Note in mr Frothinghams hands. I have not received a line in acknowledgment of the letter, which makes me a little anxious for its fate. you was so good as to Say you would send me Some salt fish. I should like a couple of kental to treat our good Massachusetts Friends. I will thank you to send it by one of the first vessels,...
I received your obliging favour of Nov br 8 th the day after I last wrote you. I inclose the amount of your account with many thanks for your kindness— The Betsy is arrived with the fish, and if my cook can be taught to dress it, some of our Nothern Friends shall Toast your Health. The state of N Jersey as you observe, most certainly manifested a very marked respect and approbation of the...
I fully unite with you in sentiment, that much ill Blood and warmth of Passion is excited by Town meeting Government. the Merchants who are most interested ought to be left free to Arm or not as they please. You cannot conceive what Mischief will result to our Country from the inteference of People, who can have only a partial view of subjects of this nature; I will tell you Sir, that the...
We now have the appearence of some fine weather our Rivers are open, but our Roads are all like what we experienced when we came through the Jersis in April last. I begin to look towards my Native state with a wish to be early there, which I fear will not be seconded by Congress, for tho many of them are distresst at the manner this session has heitherto been wasted, yet they cannot controul...
As you was absent when I left home I was unable to pay you for some articles which you had purchased for me, as well as some which mrs smith had procured for me. if you will be so good as to forward me the amount, I will transmit it to you— When I pay’d mr Fothingham for the Carriage, there were the quarter Lights and some other matters which made the carriage amount to more than our first...
The President received your Letter this morning dated 5 Feb’ry. the Rule of the former President not to answer Letters of this nature, he has abided by. his Rule is to place all Canditates for office upon a Book kept for that purpose, and to appoint to office such persons as come best recommended for abilities integrity and industery. in your case he would be particuliarly delicate, for as he...
The Death of my Mother which took place this afternoon very suddenly, will prevent my Sitting out on my journey as I had intended on twesday. we propose to burry her on Monday. I do not think I can get away untill thursday. I shall therefore omit sending Beckey untill fryday. I would wish two places engaged in the Stage as I have an other Girl to go with her, and should like to have them under...
I received your kind favour of Feb ry 25 this morning. the badness of the roads I suppose was the reason it did not reach me sooner. The Maderia I do not want to be sent here. it is for Home consumption I have no occasion for it here. there are some other articles I should wish you to secure for me immediatly half Hundred Coffe and a Hunderd & half Brown sugar; which will immediaty rise, for I...
I yesterday received your Letter of March 11 th it would give the President great satisfaction to communicate to the publick the dispatches of our Envoys if he could do it consistant with their safety and Security. the Portugeze minister is imprisoned now in France. we have not Certainty that ours have left Paris—and so critical are the times, that our Ministers cannot communicate...
I received your Letter of Jan’ ry and observed Your communication, somewhat alterd to better suit the Times. I though the alteration not amiss. the paper you inclosed to me I put into the Hands of the President. he could not apply the Character as he did not recollect that any such person had applied. I had an opportunity of shewing it to the secretary at War. he was at no loss, and mentiond a...