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I wrote you this week, but not hearing from you, as the Letter went by a transient person I fear you did not get it. I wisht to know what day this week you proposed to come up, as I would send in James with the carriage to bring up your young family. I can also accommodate you with two Beds, so that you need not be anxious about sleeping in your House untill it is quite in order. I have half a...
Yesterday the President Sit of for Trentown and on Wednesday the 9th of this Month I go; I could have wisht to have seen you here first but knowing the vacancy will not commence untill after I Sit out, I despair of it. William regreeted that he was obliged to go without Seeing you, but a Sudden call of the President to Trentown to consult with Ministers, &C obliged him to leave home early than...
I rejoice in the fine weather you have had, accounts from N York & philadelphia are rather unfavourable, but I hope Frosts will make the city fit for breathing by Novbr. I Shall Sit out on Wednesday the 9th for Several reasons. in the first place, I Shall avoid the parade of the 10th which would be very inconvenient, as I wish to put my House in order to receive leave it, in the next place mr...
Inclosed are the Letters by this days post Saturday—Tell William I received his from Worster this morning. all well but James who must needs go a Girl hunting before he recoverd from mumps, So is sick with a fever but if he cannot come on I Shall take peter, and leave him to repent of his folly Yours as ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I sent by the Stage to Haverhill some cloaths for the Children, a suit of their Grandfathers which may serve to cut up for them. I also sent a spotted cloth for to make them overalls for daily wear, and some spotted thickset for Sundays. these I hope will last them. I must depend upon you to get them made. I also sent what shirts were done at that time. I now send by mr Smith the remainder...
The pleasing Emotions excited by the Sight of a Letter, in your Hand writing, were Similar to those we experience at meeting a long absent Friends doubly endeard to us, by the perils and dangers through which they have past. I rejoice my dear Madam that you have recoverd so much Health, as to be able to assume your pen, and Such a portion of Spirits, as to discover the Same flow of soul which...
Here I am at this favorite Spot, I Sat out on Wednesday, but was detaind at West Town on thursday by main. We reachd here last Evening, and put up at Capt. Drapers—We have attended at meeting twice this day—and conclude to remain here untill tomorrow morning. I have heard of you, upon the Road, but once from you which was from Worster. Mr Hall I saw at Westown, and he informd me that you...
I got to Westown on Wednesday by four oclock and was met two miles from Town by mrs Otis, accompanied by mrs Marshall who insisted upon my putting up with them I accordingly went, and was very kindly and hospitably receivd by the Col and his Family. the old Gentleman who is now more than 80 years, still retains much of the fire and sprightlyness of youth. he is very infirm in health, but...
I reachd this place yesterday about 11 oclock and found the Family all well the Col. with his Regiment gone to the Jersies.—Mrs. Smith and Nancy reachd here on fryday from Baltimore, the fever still so bad in N York, that it is not adviseable to go in. We had two very frosty nights upon our Journey, some fogs. I took some cold. Mr. Otis a very bad one. I left him & family at Mrs. Hatens, about...
I reachd this place yesterday morning and found Mrs Smith and Caroline very well. Mrs Adams and her two little Girls have been here three weeks. N York still distressd with the fever, tho many of the inhabitants have returned to the city, yet several of them have fallen since, and from the return of so many persons, new cases have been increased. I found a Letter from the President who writes,...
In return for your polite attention I send you two old News papers, in one of which you will find a Letter of July the 3d which you will notice— I see no papers. If you have any worth sending, it will be charity to forward them / to your Aunt I shall write you more an other time. DLC : Shaw Family Papers.
I received yours last Evening of the 21st, when on the road; I could not write; I was generally so fatigued by Evening as to wish to get to Bed. we rose early and as soon we could get Breakfast sat out upon our days journey, at noon we usualy stopd two Hours; to feed ourselves and horses; and my Lame animal was a constant anxiety to me; I have got him here, and John has physick him, and bled...
I have only time whilst the Stage Stops a few moments to say that I received yours of 24 last Evening. the day was not forgotten by me. mrs Smith invited mr Otis and Family to dine with us upon the occasion, and made the token of New England thanksgiving a fine plumb pudding, and the company toasted the day & many happy returns of it— Your Letter added to the pleasure of the Day by informing...
I wrote you a few lines by Brisler who I hope will reach you today, if Johns Mumps do not prevent him from travelling. Louisas continues very much sweld yet, and it is the Sixth day since they first appeard. Caroline is seizd with a most voilent inflamation in her Eyes, so as to throw her into a fever; and oblige the Dr. to lay blisters upon her to relieve her. She is rather better to day, but...
What can you expect me to write you from this village; where I hear & know no more what is passing in the world, than if I was wholy secluded from it. I have not Seen a Newspaper Since I came and but one Gentleman from Nyork. I can tell you that the leaves wither and fall, beautifully variegated by the frost with all the coulours of the Rainbow, that the tide Ebbs and flows covering the meddow...
I received last Evening yours of the 25—with a Heart filled with gratitude, for the many Blessings I have enjoyed through the 35 years of our union; I would not look upon a single Shade in the picture; for if according to Rousseaus philosophy, abstinence from what we delight in, is the Epicurism of reason; I have had my full proportion of enjoyment; This day is very fine, I almost regret to...
I received your Letter on Saturday the 26th by Brisler who with his family arrived here in safety John was taken with the Mumps the day before. he was not so sick, as to prevent their proceeding to cross the Ferry—I have not heard of him since, but expect to, this day. Louiisa has had the Mumps, so as to be swelld up to her Eyes. they have been a week upon her, and are not yet gone—Caroline...
Tomorow morning I expect to leave this place, and proceed on my way to Philadelphia—where I hope soon to hear from you. Frank and family had arived before Brisler. They had only ten days passage. our Envoys I presume are ready to sail. The P writes me that he hopes they are gone that there may no longer be room for impertinent paragraphs fabricated by busy bodies who are forever meddling with...
I left East Chester on the 5th of the month and reachd Brunswick on the 9th where the President met me; on fryday we all arrived in safety; having had a pleasent and agreable journey; I found the President had taken on his Journey a voilent cold, which was very afflicting to him and, hung much heavier than if he had earlier attended to it. it reduced his flesh; took away his appetite; I think...
I wrote to you twice from East Chester. I left there the day I proposed; and had a fine passage across the North River. It was quite calm & not cold. We proceeded on our journey to Newark the same day, and there finding that we could go to Brunswick as conveniently by travelling through Springfield and Scotch plain to plainfield the place where the Col Smith is encampd with three Regiments, we...
I have been from Quincy more than five weeks, and have received only one Letter from any Friend Since I left them; I find however that you have not been unmindfull of us. the fish arrived Safe and we regaled ourself with it, mr and mr. otis joining in the commemoration of the good things of New England Poultry we have here, both cheeper and in better order than our markets produce it, but the...
Least you Should not See many of the curiosities produced in the Aurora; I Shall now and then inclose you a choice morsal; in this, which I now forward you you will find a Letter Said to have been written by a mr Crammond of this City, to mr Parish the former Consul at Hamburgh and printed in a Paris paper. mr Crammond is a respectable English merchant of this City, but by no means a...
I received yesterday your favour of Novbr 8th and thank you for the information containd in it, The weather has been uncommonly fine through the whole of this month; I wish you had used your own judgment respecting the putting up the frame this winter. I had not any expectation of its being so early ready, or of the winters being So mild, but it is now so far advanced that it may be best to...
Your kind Letter reachd me on the 20th. I began to feel very impatient to hear from you; your Letter afforded me much pleasure; I rejoice that so worthy and amiable a man as mr Kendall allways appeard to me, is like to be so soon, and agreably setled. I would willingly exchange all the discourses I have heard here since I came and all I shall be like to hear, for the one half which e’en chance...
Mrs Smith Louisa mrs otis Rush Peters and a number of young Ladies are just gone to Congress to hear the Speech which is deliverd at 12 oclock to day; I should have liked well enough to have been of the party, but it would not have been proper—you will see it, as soon as you will get the Letter I presume Some people will not be pleased, I Suppose because it will not disclose enough about the...
I received this week your Letters of Novbr 24th and 28th and this morning yours of decbr 3d,—the contents of which gave me much pleasure. it will be a real Subject of rejoicing to me, if we obtain mr Whitney for our pastor; it will greatly add to the pleasure I anticipate upon my return to Quincy to find that we are in possession of a Gentleman of mr Whitneys known and acknowledged talents, so...
Death, thou art no Respecter of persons; Washington is no more! a Great Man has fallen, and his End is peace, I shall dye said he, but death has no terrors for me; this Melancholy Event, was this day brought to this city by the mail and by private Letters; the Croup was the rapid disease which put a period to the days, of him whose, memory will I trust be Embalmed in the Hearts of all true...
I wrote to you the day after we received the account of the death of Gen’ll Washington. this event so important to our Country at this period, will be universally deplored no man ever lived, more deservedly beloved and Respected. the praise and I may say addulation which followed his administration for several years, never made him forget that he was a Man, Subject to the weakness and frailty...
The paper which I inclose to you, will Shew you at one view the measures which have been adopted as tributes of gratefull Remembrance to the Remains of “the Man who united all Hearts,” and whose Death a whole Nation mourn’s—When the heavy tydings reach the inhabitants of our State, I am Sure they will not be wanting in testimonies of Regret and Respect; As Congress have requested the president...
Whilst in unison with the sympathetic Sorrow of a Nation; I unite in deploring the Loss; it has sustained of a Father, Friend and Benefactor. I intreat Madam, that you would permit a Heart deeply penetrated with your loss, and shareing personally in your Greif; to mingle with you, the Tears which flow for the partner of all your joys and Sorrows. Deep as the Wound you have Sustained is, and...