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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Welsh, Harriet

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I expected you home. that is the reason I did not write. beside I have melted away and very, very feeble—I rejoice to learn that you have had a fine rain. we had only a little drisel , but miss H Adams Said the Minister thanked the Lord for that; and prayed that he would send a soaking rain. we may put up a Similar petition, for Rain is much wanted— I received this morning your favour of 28...
But once Since You left us, have I received a line from you. Twice I have written, and twenty hundred times twenty; thought of you, and Sometimes with an exclamation, what can be the reason that H. does not write? now you who have Eyes, fingers at command, and the pen of a ready writer, ought to employ them, when they are So much Sought after. I presume they are so: and that you have Some...
I have Sent the Shoe & Shall have a pr by Saturday—it is a folly to keep the Boots I Send—charles will out grow them—and as mr John wants to make money by them, his uncle consents to give him his price for them— osburn will call to day for the articles I Sent for—a line from you to Callender will get them for me. you will be so good as to pay him for them—I did not receive any Tea— The weather...
My last Note went to you by mr Marston, with two Letters enclosed—I did not write on Saturday as mr A. calld before I had leisure in the morning—it is now five weeks Since Susan was confined, and She is not able to Sit up more than half the day—She has been much weakened by an inflamation and much pain. added to that, what is calld the Miliary Eruption, which I never before Saw, but which I...
I beleive you thought me very imprudent to consent to the Presidents going to Town So cold a day as yesterday—but the cold increased much after the morning and I was quite anxious untill he returnd—much pleased and gratified with his days excursion there is Such a thing as Staying at Home untill it becomes wearisome to us change of place, or dear variety compose part of our happiness I enclose...
I have wanted to be writing these two days, but an incessant succession of company which the fine sleighing has tempted out, has prevented, and this Evening after tea I have taken my pen to thank you, for your kindness to George, and to say mr Adams will Send you a check upon the Bank on Saturday if he does not come to Town before—I have a Letter from Caroline which altho it does not contain...
I received the articles this morning cloth Nankeen Ribbon Letter covers &c altho the Gospel declares man & wife to be one, the Law of congress will not allow me that priviledge and my name upon a package or Letter Subjects me to postage—in future by post, let my good mans priviledge cover mine—I Send you my last Letter—what would have been Said in my day if Such Etiquette had been establishd?...
Mrs Cushing came last fryday to make me a visit, so that I have not been able to write a line She left me to day about noon, when I received a note from You with Carolines and mr Lymans Letter. it took us Some time and trouble to decypher it, but finally we made out to read & reread it. The president thinks it the best and most accurate account of the State of Literature & the Learned...
The President has a letter from Vanderkemp, in which he proposes to have him send a collection of my letters to publish! A pretty figure I should make. No. No. I have not any ambition to appear in print. Heedless and inaccurate as I am, I have too much vanity to risk my reputation before the public. Printed Source--Letters of Mrs. Adams. Edited by Charles Francis Adams (Boston: 1840)..
I received last Evening the Calico & your Bill, in which I find Several mistakes which I Shall point out as I proceed. when you purchased me the Bombazet, I enclosed ten dollars. You bought me 7 yd 2 Skeins of Silk Some linen, one pound Tea 6 pd currents & 3 pd of coffe, the last of which I took tho I did not Send for it. all these articles of Groceries you have omitted in Your Bill—I then...
The moon shone so bright this morning that I rose, as it seems while it was yet Night, and allotted a portion to my Maidens, & set my whole house hold in motion, for you must know that we have Six Men at this day, three ladies, who love us so dearly that they must stay. a cold winter comeing & no Home, and wish the old Gentleman was but 25—I had a specimin of a compliment this morning from one...
I known you are fast asleep while I have kindled my own fire in my chamber calld my men and maidens and am sit down in the parlour to write much to brag of at 73. but then I cannot see to thread my needle, nor sew quick nor go here & there as I could in days past, but then I have better health, and in general good Spirits. always endeavouring to look upon the bright side without Gloomy...
I return Carolines Letter with thanks and rejoice to learn that she & the Family arrived safe after their Quixot expedition, in which I think Caroline risked her own Life & that of her child—tho while she was here I did not like to tell her so. She certainly made too free with her Health & constitution as her appearence showed— I have a commission from mrs dexter rather I should say petition....
Welcome home again—I received by mrs Adams your Note, and Carolines, the Same Mail brought me a Letter from Susan of the 7th from utica, saying that the Carriage was at the door waiting to convey them to Albany, from thence they should proceed to Fishkill—and I suppose would arrive there just about the time Caroline intended Setting out. which may retard them a day or two—I hope however if...
while I congratulate dear Caroline upon the Birth of a daughter, I am calld to mourn with her Brother, upon the loss of a son. mr Adams writes me, that he found them in great affliction He is with mr & mrs Fry—expecting to get to Housekeeping by the first of this month. He is entering upon the Duties of his office, with fear and trembling. His Eyes and his right Hand threaten to fail him, and...
Before I go into Bed, I must write you a few lines, after the agitation of the day—about Ten this morning Louisa announced a carriage & four comeing down the Hill. I ran to the door, it arrived in a few moments, the first who sprang out was John, who with his former ardour was round my neck in a moment. George followd half crazy calling out o Grandmother—o Grandmother. Charles half frightned,...
I wrote to you on Monday by mr Cruft in much anxiety about John requesting you to let hear from you pr post, if not by osburn—I have not heard a word Since. I mentiond I beleive Sending to Mr Fosters, but I had as good send to wisscasset—I got the carpet on Saturday by Mr Beal, but did not know it, when I wrote to you. I like it much. thank you. but I made the Crape answer tho not very...
Thank you thank you dear Harriet for the Letter from mr Adams you sent me last Evening. tho only a few lines, it informd me that after a passage of 50 days from Cowes they had arrived all well—and should remain no longer in N york than to get out their baggage & necessary arrangements, that in a week or ten days they would be here—I presume by the close of the week or sooner—It will indeed be...
How shall we get on without you? I dont half like it. why cannot you come out with mr Shaw? if you had Said Yes mr Clarke would gladly have come in for you. taking all things into consideration—I made a proposition to them to day that they should be married on Sunday Evening—as they rejected having a dinner, for I could not see how I could avoid a dinner if they were married in the...
The Books have come, and never were in the Custom house as I beleive. it was not a Box, but a package. Farmers Works are a part of them. mr Tappant, Sent them out. mr Aspinwall our consul had the charge of them, and they came in the Margaret Frances, and not as Supposed in the Galen I received your Note by mr Greenleaf. I inclose the pattern I like best. Seven yds if you please of it. Louissa...
I inclose to you a paper with the distrest State of an old Batchelor, not Supposing that you will answer the advertizement, but because amongst my acquaintance I know no one who So nearly answers his description—He has left his own qualifications out of the question—a dolt does he think to get Such a wife without Sterling worth on his own part? dr Franklin says “ a Batchelor is not a compleat...
mr Clark will deliver you this Susan has a Letter from her Mother urgeing her to come to See her, and consenting to her.… which I cannot under present circumstances—so they say no more to me—I think with you that it will be best for them to go Silently and if a female travelling companion can be found at the Same time it will be more agreable—fine weather for your Father & Sister Mr C will...
Two more Letters accompany this for mr Lyman and if time will allow I have no doubt but I shall get an answer from mr Jefferson, as Luck would have it. George in his Letter to his Grandfather, Speaks of mr Sharp as having dinned with his father and having spoken of his Grandfather in handsome terms. this was a good opening to renew old acquaintance—I inclose to you two of the letters which...
I wrote the inclosed a few days Since, but not having an opportunity to Send it which I liked I have kept it for the memorandum which it contains—Louisa gets a little strength, tho She Swells and puffs in her feet and arms, no perspiration upon her. her appetite is better and She bears the Bark which is a good Symptom. these March winds are intolerable, worse than the coldest we have had...
I have not had any opportunity of writing to you before—indeed I have been So occupied: that I have not had time, for beside Sickness, the good folk who love Sleighing have many of them embraced this opportunity of visiting us; and Louissa wants constant watching to Supply her by little & little with the small nourishment She takes and to See that She does not exceed her Strength by Sitting up...
The weather has been so Boisterous to day that not one of us have ventured out to meeting. I have written a long Letter to Caroline, and I Send you her two last Letters and return those of mr Everets, with thanks. I think them full as entertaining as Eustices Letters classical Tour. I laughd heartily at the attack of the young Lady who insisted upon Waltz waltzing with the Gentlemen. The other...
I return the sermon with my Thanks I had read it before, mr Newton brought it in manuscript to us. I was pleased with it, then and quite as much upon a second perusal—the letters I shall inclose to Caroline on Monday—Mr Coleman was much pleasd with the kind notice he received from the great people and from Mr Rush and family in particular. when he says he felt at home their children were all...
I know dear H. that you will be glad to learn that S. received a Letter last Evening from mr C. dated 6 Jan’ry. he was recovering Slowly, but his Blister proved a troublesome companion so bad the dr had forbiden him to write for more than a week he was not disposed to remove from his Lodgings untill he heard from here, then as soon as he was able he intended sitting out for Washington. his...
Many happy returns of the Season dear Harriet is wished you by your Friend, who you know would rejoice to see you at Quincy, but the Gay parties in Boston, must have more charms for the young and Beautifull, than the Sombre & dreary view of a dead & brown carpet which covers the Earth at present, & the leafless Trees, so naked and bare. I want to see it put on the white mantle, so emblamatical...
I have not had any opportunity of returning the Letter and paper you Sent me on Saturday. mr C. did not call here on Sunday, but went on to Hingham. he did not return on Sunday Evening with Susan as I expected, nor Stop here on Monday, all of which I dissaprove—the poor Mans mind is much perplexd. we had a conversation, which gave rise to a Letter of a Friendly Nature, and a most tender and...