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You will, I know, share with your father and me, in lamenting the death of our ancient friend, our physician, the constant correspondent and endearing companion; the benevolent, learned, and ever to be regretted Rush. It is indeed a heavy stroke; an unexpected one to your father: one for which we were unprepared, having a weekly correspondence with him for a long time. On Saturday last we...
It is so long Since I received a Letter from you or any of the Family that I am not a little anxious to hear. I have attributed it to the great fall of Snow which has obstructed prevented the Southern post getting in Regular Succession—and we have learnt that the Northern Roads are still more obstructed—yet I have Sent every Post to the office in hopes to hear. I have written You Several...
I wrote to you last week. Our election is over, and Mr. Gerry and Gray undoubtedly elected by a majority of more than two thousand votes. Vermont and New-Hampshire have elected republican Governors. A prodigious revolution in the sentiments and opinions of the people of these States has been effected by the conduct of England and France towards us; but more particularly the shuffling, tricking...
I rejoice to learn by Caroline’s letter to Susan, (which in her absence I took the liberty of opening,) that you had made an excursion to visit a friend. We stand in need of some variety to keep both body and mind in tune. The bountiful Parent of the universe has amply supplied our wants in this respect, by the succession of day and night, of seed time and harvest, of summer and winter, to...
The weather has been so intensely cold for near a Month past that I have not taken a pen or attempted to write a Letter, nor have I acknowledged yours of Janry 15th received a fortnight ago, nor Johns bearing date 1st of Jan’ry. without any snow upon the ground we have had a Month of the coldest weather I recollect to have experienced Since the year your Father and Brother saild for France....
Yesterday your father received a letter from William. We rejoice to learn that you are well; and I have the pleasure to inform that we are all getting better, and that I intend to dine below to-day. I congratulate you that the embargo is like to be raised. I hope the non-intercourse bill will be lost; and the merchantmen send out frigates to convoy the trade, molest no one, and defend...
To cheer the gloom which, in despite of my efforts to dispel, will hang about my heart upon the return of this day, which used to be endeared to me by the presence of your brother, I must have recourse to my pen and write about him, whilst my imagination follows him upon the ocean, sometimes wafted by gentle gales, and sometimes buffeting the winds and the waves. You, too, have your anxieties...
I yesterday received your letter of June 1st. I think letters are longer upon their passage than they used to be, when you were at Quincy. Since I wrote to you in May, I have been visited by St. Anthony, and most severely scourged by him: he first attacked one of my ears, but as I was wholly ignorant of the holy visiter, I paid little attention to him, except endeavouring to quiet him by bread...
Yesterday your father brought me the much–desired packet. You mention General Eaton’s town–meeting speech, which I had seen. I presume he was in spirits when he made it; his virulence against Mr. —— is really personal—thereby hangs a tale. Mr. Lear, you know, made a treaty with Tripoli, which, through the misrepresentation of Eaton and his intrigues, had like to have been rejected by the...
I have not had a line from you for several weeks. Your father visits the post-office every post day; and, although he frequently returns with his pockets full of letters, I do not find among them the superscription which is dearer to me than all the rest. You must know, since he has publicly avowed himself the father of the whole nation , he has a most prodigious number of letters from his...
I have not had a line from you for many weeks. Your Father visits the post office every post day and altho he frequently returns with his pocket full of Letters I find not amongst them the Superscription which is dearer to me than all the rest. You must know Since he has publickly avowed himself the Father of the Whole Nation, he has a most prodigious number of Letters from his adopted ospring...
Your two last letters of March 10th and 23d, came safe to hand. They gave me great pleasure, not only from learning by them that you enjoyed good health, but your spirits were more animated from your little excursions from home, and from your prospects with respect to your family. I most sincerely rejoice in any event which looks like prosperity. Your trials have been many and various. You...
What is the reason I do not get a Letter from my Mother I think I hear you say? Why I will tell you Child. I have Sat down more than once, got through one page, been interrupted, laid it by—untill it seemd of no value. I love to be by myself when I write and that is a difficult thing in the winter season. the parlour your Father occupies all the forenoon in reading or writing. it is proper he...
I am indebted to you for two Letters one of the last bearing date Novbr 20th. & 24th. I am always rejoiced to see your handwriting, altho the contents of your Letters some times give me pain, and none more so than those which contain an Idea that your Relatives, and Friends have not exerted themselves for you as they might have done. With respect to william. Your Father himself went to Town:...
Your Letter of Sepbr 25 together with Carolines came safe to hand, but I have been in a kind of Turmoil ever since, and never felt retired, or quiet enough to sit down to my pen. It is a great misfortune to me that I cannot see to write in an Evening, without injury to my Eyes. your Aunt Cranch’s sickness has lain heavey at my heart. She is I hope recovering, but she has been much broken down....
I began a Letter to you on Sunday last in which I informed you that your Sister S. Adams and Abbe arrived here the week before in good health & spirits, that they left your Mother Sisters & Son well. John has written me a Letter by them which is the first I have received from them him, tho he frequently writes to his Grandfather. I shall not fail replying to him. Susan has been a month at...
Do you know how long a time has elapsed since you wrote a single line to your Mother? You did not use to be thus neglectfull of your pen: I am myself frequently tardy, but I believe unless the post has failed: that I have written twice, Since I recieved a Letter from you. Caroline has written once to me: and once to Susan so that my mind has been releived from the apprehension that you were...
Do you know my Dear Daughter that the date of your last Letter was the 3 of June, since which I have not received a line from you. Perhaps you may have been occupied as I have been by a large family—Providence has been so bountifull to us this Season in the rich and ample supply of Grass, that we can neither procure sufficient hands to cut it; or Barns ample large enough to contain it. we have...
Here we are Sitting by a good fire in the parlour, and wearing, our winter coats to meeting, whilst our windows are coverd with a profusion of roses, our Wall’s decorated with flowers expanding their Beauties to the cold Northern blast, which rudely lacerates their delicate texture, unmindfull of their Beauty; and headless of their fragrance. I rose the other morning delighted with the visit I...
When confined to my Chamber as I am at present by indisposition, I get more leisure for writing than when occupied employd with my family occupations. tho for two day my Head has sufferd such severe pain that I could neither write or read. to day I feel much releived, and if neither chills or fever attack me to day, I shall hope to be below stairs in a day or two. I have enjoyd for a year past...
I took my pen to write to you this morning in a placid temper of mind; the news papers of yesterday lay by me, which I had not lookd into comeing late last evening from Boston: papers bearing the title of Federal. I found in them such a bitter Spirit of Party, such uncandid constructions, such false conclusion and, such mean crinching to one power, and such bigg Blustering against an other,...
It is So long since I received a Letter from you; that I am anxious to hear from you. I have written twice Since, once before william left us; and once Since. I hope he has arrived in health and Safety; we received his Letter from Albany and heard by way of miss Hinkly, that his visit to Govenour Strong was very pleasing to the Govenour. I feel anxious for him the times are very discourageing...
William left us on thursday, and on fryday set his face towards you. we parted with him, with much reluctance his whole conduct has been so Satisfactory to all of us, that our Blessings and good wishes will follow him, where ever he goes, or what ever his destination in Life may be. to the reading Law he appeard averse; and he offerd weighty reasons against it. the bent of his mind appears to...
William has been so punctual in writing to you every week, that I have been more remiss. I cannot write in an Evening; the only time in which I feel a disposition to use my pen is the forenoon. You know how buisily that is generally occupied, and more so now Louisa is in Boston, and the Farm buisness is just commencing. mrs dexter is going to housekeeping. I know not where to supply her place,...
I received yours of the 9th. and thank you for the excellent matter which it contained. Mr Shaw has not sent you any papers from hence because the papers have not been worth transmitting, a tupor appears to have seized every person and the query what can be done? what will be done? what ought to be done? seems to be the questions, amongst the three parties, into which not only the Legislature...
I received your letter by Mr. Pintard. Two articles we are much distressed for; the one is bells, but the more important one is wood. Yet you cannot see wood for trees. No arrangement has been made, but by promises never performed, to supply the newcomers with fuel. Of the promises Briesler had received his full share. He had procured nine cords of wood; between six and seven of that was...
I arrived here on Sunday last, and without meeting with any accident worth noticing, except losing ourselves when we left Baltimore, and going eight or nine miles on the Frederick road, by which means we were obliged to go the other eight through woods, where we wandered two hours without finding a guide, or the path. Fortunately, a straggling black came up with us, and we engaged him as a...
Mr Smith called upon me a few moments this forenoon & brought me your letter of May 9th. I received the favour in due order. General Marshall is nominated Secretary of State, Mr Dexter Secretary of War in lieu of General Marshall promoted, further I say not, sensations of various Kinds will undoubtedly be felt and many reflections no doubt be cast, yet so it is. You Know the resolution has not...
This will be delivered to you, by our friend, Mrs. Smith, who will pass you, on her way to New-York; she is determined to call, and ask you how you are. Since I wrote you last, some changes have taken place. The Secretary of War has resigned, and General Marshal, is nominated in his place. I fear, however, that he will not be prevailed upon to accept the appointment; such times are approaching...
I have not written you for several days, you will easily suppose my time much occupied by having Mrs Johnson, & now our Boston friends here and making preparation to go away. Mrs Johnson will go tomorrow or Tuesday. Mrs Smith on Friday. Thursday will be my last public dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens can tell you what a crowd we had on friday evening. The rooms and entry were full, and so hot as...