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enclosed is a Letter which you will see contains a request to me; and through me to you. the ploughing with the Hiffer is not yet out of date. were the object an office, I should refuse to medle with it, but as it is only a simple renewal of a midshipman from one ship & station to an other, I would hope no great interest necessary; particularly as his Health has sufferd severely in this...
I think I once heard you Say—to make a thing choice it Should be rare. your kind Letter last Evening received—possesst both those qualities. The very Sight of your hand writing—addresd as formerly gave a Spring to my Spirits, and your Father Sprung from the settee to place himself by my Side, while I read it to him—I have foreborne writing to you, during the Session of Congress, being...
I write but seldom to you, least you should feel as tho’ you were obliged to replie, when you must be much occupied with public Business and as I am now engaged to address you in that line, You will feel obliged to listen. My present design is to name to you a Gentleman for office conditionally. It is reported that Major Warren of plymouth is about to resign, or be removed from the office of...
As you accused me last Evening, or rather Night with preventing the Ladies from writing to you; I apologized by saying that I had a Letter written to you at home,which was really the case. I made a Fairy visit to Washington last night, in which time I visited mrs Munroe, mrs Madison &c, and meeting you and mrs Adams in the street, in fine Health and Spirits, you accosted me as above—I was too...
The president has thought it Safe for the Students to assemble at Cambridge upon fryday last, and George has followd yesterday. we Shall miss his Society much. he has been company for his Grandfather Since Louissa has been Sick—I hope he is properly imprest, with the necessity of arduous application—John and Charles appear to like their Preceptor very well and perform their lessons I am told,...
Through the kind of attention of mr Crafts we learnt yesterday morning of the arrival of the Washington, and in the Evening, through our watchfull centinal Harriet, I received the gratefull intelligence under your own hand, that you were Landed and all well for which joyfull News to your parents; God be thanked—we now wait, in pleasing expectation of welcoming You; one and all, to the old...
I will write to you again, and untill I learn from you, that you have taken your passage home.—I have now to acknowledge a succession of Letters from you, arriveing nearly all together No 106. No 107 No 108 No 109 No 10010 and No 111 March the 16th which is the late date— I hope you did not think, when I wrote to you pressing your return to America, that my object was the office to which you...
Your Letters are always Common property with the Family to hear from you, and know that you are all well, is a mutual gratification to us all—Your Father is not so punctual in acknowledging Letters, dates and numbers as you are, so that your last Letter to him of Janry 14th No 56 is left for me to notice, and laugh, at your excuse for its brevity. I have received several from you of the like...
I write you a few lines in addition to what I have already written, and inclose you the Copy of a Letter from mr Otis to your Father, by which you will learn that your Nomination as Secretary of State, was confirmd, with one only dissenting vote, just sufficient to save you from the war. whose it was I neither know or care for no president since Washington, has been chosen by the people, with...
The voice of the Nation call’s you home. the Government call you home—and your parents unite in the general call to this Summons. you must not, you cannot refuse your assent, nor will you, I presume have a disposition to regret so honorable an appointment, as is assignd to you; by so unanimous a vote— It is now more than four months Since the News papers from all parts of the united States,...
I must begin my Letter by wishing you and yours, many returns of the Season, as pleasent, as delightfull as the present for the winter hitherto has been as mild, as the Summer was cold. “Sterne Says, God tempers the wind to the Shorn Lamb” and the winter as yet; has been temperd to the wants, and necessities of the people: altho their Herbage was cut off, and the Herds in their stalls will be...
“Oh that I too, could make a visit to my Father,” was your exclamation in your last Letter. more than a visit You may make, my dear Son, If the Newspapers may be credited, for they announce from South to North, that you are to be recall’d and to fill the department of State. this is repeated over and again, & appears to give universal satisfaction. this I learn from all quarters—I rejoice in...
I think I will not give to any passenger any Letters, unless a Letter of introduction, for however urgent they are to be charged with them, I find frequently that they lay months before they are deliverd. If my Letters cannot have the Novelty of youth to recommend them, They will lose their most valuable quality, and be very dull in their old Age—like a twice told tale, and very like, better...
while your Father is deeply engaged, in reading, Dupuis “orgine de Tous Les Cultes ou Religion universelle” which he Says is the most Learned work he ever read. all is Silent around me, and I embrace this Season of quiet and tranquility to write to you, and to acknowledge your Letter of August 12th No 92.—your hand writing, always gives me a Spring to my Spirits, and is like a cordial, altho...
Since my Letter to you of the 23 of August I have only written one Letter! it was to Abbe Shaw congratulating her upon her marriage, which took place upon the 18th of this month, to which I was invited, but many Circumstances prevented my attendance. She is gone with her Husband to reside in Salem. She has the prospect of being happily married. She is a good and amiable girl, possessing many...
I yesterday received some Letters from the Children dated 26 June. as I had some weeks before received my June Letter from you, I had not any right to expect an other of the Same Month, and altho’ as Shakespeare says, “my appetite grows on what it feeds on” I must own I am avaricious in this respect. In this still calm, and political pause I must entertain you with domestic occurrences, one of...
I make it a rule to begin my Letters by an acknowledgment of those which I have received from you, when any such there are. I have now the pleasure to notice yours of june the 6th No 89—I do this for two reasons—1st because every correspondent likes to know, that their Letters, are received, and 2ly that they are worthy notice, and there is not any Subject, apparently trivial in itself, but...
I have to acknowledge your favours of 23 April No. 86 of the 15 May No 87, and yesterday by mr Bond your Letter of May 20th No 88, and the Review and news paper The Reviews you will charge, as your Father requests, with the other Books which you Send him I inclose to you a Strip of a newspaper which contains some account of our National Jubilee, an event of more consequence to America, than...
The east wind of this day, will prevent the Sailing of the Galen, and it gives me the opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of May 13th No 87; and the papers containing the Royal Marriage which came to hand last Evening: by the arrival of a vessel at N york; this interesting , and important intelligence, had been partially communicated to the publick a week before—Some...
If I write you ten Letters, to one from you, Still I Should be your debtor, for one of yours is worth ten of mine, and one over— yet in Love, and affection, the account Shall be balanced—I Shall always recollect with a pleasure, which I cannot describe, the Sensation I felt, when mr Woodard returnd from Russia and came to see me. I know well his Father, and Family, but him I had never Seen...
Altho I have written to you, more than once since I have received a Letter from you, I know how gratefull it is, to absent Friends to hear from each other, especially when to learn, that they are living; can be added, the agreable circumstance of their being in health. with gratitude to Heaven, I can Say; I was brought low, but I am raised up. I have this week visited my Friends in Boston,...
I have already written to you by the Galen, my Letter was anteriour to the calamity which the inclosed papers will full soon, inform you of.—what can we Say? but Lord thou destroyest the hopes of man. I know not how to describe the Gloom which has overspread the public mind—To departed worth, the tear of Friendship flow’s. Party Spirit is Silent, and drops her veil, and bows acknowledging...
It was not untill this morning that I received your Letter of December 5th No 79, just five months from the date. where it has been ever since, I know not. it came to me from Nyork, and had just arrived there. The subject of it, you will Remember by turning to your coppy. There is not any reasoning which can convince me, contrary to my Senses, that Three, is one, and one three. Is it possible...
Mr Edward Brooks, Eldest son of mr P C Brooks has visited us, and offerd to take Letters for us to you. his parents you know, and this young Gentleman is worthy of such parents he is said by those best acquainted with him to be a solid Sensible and correct Character—Such as will do no dishonour to our Native State, or Country. any civility in your power to show him, will be gratefully received...
Upon this day solemnized to me, by the anniversary of the death of my beloved Sister, and by the recent event of yesterday, which has cut off an other Relative from the Parent Stock, by the death of our Friend mr William Smith. my mind is so much affected, that I shall feel a releif in communicating my feelings.—I am still living, lingering upon the confines, of the Grave, where e’er this day,...
Your Letter No 80 December 27th 1815 I have received—Since my last Letter to you, which I think was in Jan’ry, I then wrote to you, under an impression, that it would prove my Last. But it has pleased Heaven to keep me yet longer from the Skies—I cannot Say, but at times, I have felt a regreet, at being like to return again to the world—of which I have, more of a prospect, than for months...
your Letter of Nov’br 7th allarmd me when I opend it, and Saw that it was in the hand writing of mrs Adams, and I read with trembling—while I rejoice that you have So able a Substitute, I cannot but regret the occasion for it—your hand may be restored to its use again, but your Eyes have reason to complain that you have used them too hardly. in this instance only—have you been a hard master to...
Having been attacked this morning with a dangerous Complaint, I have requested Louisa to write you a few lines enclosing a Note, The disposition of which, I wrote you my request, in my last Letter dated December 1815—which Letter, and note, I deliver to Louisa Smith—to keep untill your return— MHi : Adams Papers.
By mr. Tarbel, who left here the last of Nov’br I wrote to you, and to mrs Adams, introducing him to you, as the Grandson of our Ancient, and beloved Friend, dr. Tufts, who then enjoyed his faculties and was active in buisness—but upon the 8th of this month, closed a Life of virtuous usefullness. having finishd the works assignd him, he fell asleepe asleep—for his death was not preeceeded by...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...
I this day received your Letter No 75 24th August by way of Newyork—Your Father had received one of a later date 31 August, in which you mention this to me.—I have written to you, and to Mrs Adams and the Children by Mr Smith, who saild from Nyork the begining of the Month, in the Minerva for Liverpool I thank you for the minute, and particular account you have given me of your Labours, and...
The vessels which I have already written by have been detaind: by contrary winds, and give me an opportunity of adding a few more lines. Your Father has also written to you, and as according to Deans Swifts practise, he usually Submits his Letters to the inspection of the Old Lady, for her approbation, or dissent, altho he will not always alter. In a Letter written this morning, more from...
Captain Tracy is to Sail on Sunday in the Galen. our young Gentlemen are all flying abroad. Some upon buisness. Some from curiosity. those of the most respectable standing apply for Letters of introduction to you—Your Father has given Letters to mr Prescott, who goes first to the Brazills. he has also written to you, and the children by mr John Gray, who is a passenger in the Galen. An other...
Last week I Sent Letters to Newyork for you Mrs Adams, and the children. I write now to Say that we are all well, and because I would not let a vessel go without a Letter for you I inclose one for George. we have not any Letters of a later date from you than july— Harper is displaying his Anti American Principles, if Principles he has. in Maryland a Part of that State are as turbulent as our...
Peace with Algiers, Peace with Algiers did peace ever make a Great Man? Tis war that makes the Hero! This is the Speach of the Moor in Schillers Robbers only substituting Germany for Algiers, but has not the Sentiment a foundation in the Nature of man? but good dr Tillison says, that man is not naturally the Enemy of Man,—from whence then came wars and fightings? the divines will tell us, that...
Captain Tracy is to Sail on Sunday in the galen. our young men are flying abroad. some upon buisness, some from curiosity; those of the most respectable Standing apply for letters of introduction to you. your Father has given letters to mr Prescott who goes first to the Brazills and now to mr John Gray who is a passenger in the Galen an other Gentleman has now applied by the Name of...
I closed a Letter to you last week, and sent it to Liverpool by the Juno Captain Emery—full of wailings for Letters at that time we had not received a line since those brought to us by mr Smith, untill thursday the 23d of this month, when the Galen arrived. by her you Father received one of 19th June, and from each of my Grandsons I had the pleasure of hearing from under their own hand’s I do...
This Anniversary is So well known to you, that you will not wonder; that it always returns with a Solemn knell to me. how many of these days in a year have we to call to remembrance, when Some Root, or Branch has been Severd from us? and now one of the third generation is added to the number. Catharine has lost her Daughter with the Measles. both Parents are much afflicted. I wished to have...
I again take my pen, not to find any fault with you, that I do not hear from you, because I know that many Letters must be upon the wings of the wind, written by you, for me. I have only to regret, that they are so slow, to satisfy my earnest desire to hear from you; I have been made joyfull by learning that your sons had a fine passage, and arrived safe; and I see by the papers mention made...
This Letter my dear son, is to introduce to you, and mrs Adams, the Lady of Major Manners, whose mother has written to me to request it. as the daughter of our much Loved, and highly respected Friend, the late Dr Rush, You will receive her with kindness. Ever since the death, of that friend of your Fathers, and of the family, I have had an occasional correspondence with mrs Rush—and your...
The Milo Captain Glover is to sail on Sunday the Second of July. I will not let him go without a few lines, altho I have not received any return, or acknowledgment of those Letters, I Sent by him in March, nor heard from you, Since your date of the 20th of that Month All calculation are Set at nought, with respect to the Hostile aspect of Europe—and we look—and wait, listen & anticipate,...
Dr Eustice, for so he will be call’d altho now our minister to Holland, came yesterday to make us a visit, and to take leave, previous to his leaving America—he goes out in the Frigate Congress. he requested me to write by him. I replied, that I had written so frequently of late, that I had not any thing to add. he thought a Lady could never be at a loss. I should not neither, if I had...
I must abide by the rule I have establishd, which is not to let any opportunity of writing to you, pass unimproved.—altho I have no later letters from you, to acknowledge than, that, from Paris of the 19th March. Since the receit of which, I believe I have written you half a dozen. I have little more to say now, than that we are all well, anxiously longing for Letters from you, and for...
My last Letter, was written last week, and addrest to mrs Adams, by the Amsterdam packet, which sail’d for Liverpool. it is now your turn, and I embrace the opportunity of introducing to you, a young Gentleman who was named for you, and whom you must recollect, as the Son of our Good Friends, dr and mrs Welch—he wishes to see you, and the Children, during the Short stay he will make in...
This day compleats five weeks since my dear Boys embarked for Liverpool, and now I anticipate their arrival and your, and their Mothers joy at the prospect of meeting them. if it is equal to the pain I felt at parting with them, I can wish you no greater enjoyment. My Reason and judgment, both approved of their going to you, for they were approaching an Age, when more vigilance was necesary,...
Yesterday, was one, of the most joyful days of my life Harriet Welsh, like a winged mercury, came flying with your Letters received by Mail in the morning, from N york. under cover from Napolean Caroline de Wint, who knowing my anxiety, respecting you, and Mrs Adams. she seizd them in the moment they were deliverd, and forwarded them by Mail, with the pleasing intelligence that her mother, and...
"String after String, is severed from the Heart" The parting with my dear Boys the final parting, as I consider it, has excited the tenderest emotions of my Heart. I have Struggled to bring my mind to the test of reason, to that which was fittest and best. providence at this interesting period has Seen fit, to try me, by a Still Severer Stroke—by the Sudden and unexpected death of my dear and...
The Galen, Capt Tracy, is ready to sail, and by her I write you a few lines altho much in haste. to say that we are all well, and preparing your sons; to send to you, in the crew packet. Captain Branson for Liverpool; he is from Hingham, and well known by the Children, which renders it much more agreable to them, than going with a Stranger. I hoped to have heard from you again, before we sent...
Mr Depand has sent his Clerk here this Evening, to say that he would sail tomorrow in the Milo, captain Glover of this Town. the notice is short, and I should regret it the more if I had not already written to you by this same vessel. I have acknowledgd the receit of your Letters No 66, 23 Nov’br not first received, than of 26 of December No 67, and this day by way of England, your Letter of...
yesterdays Mail brought us the Nomination s to foreign Courts, yours of course, was to England. altho no event could have been so agreable to me, as your return to America. I feel a relief that that you have left the cold region of the North; and come so much nearer to me, where I can hope, with the return of peace, a freer intercourse with you, the only solace left me, to compensate for your...