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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
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I must begin my Letter by wishing you and yours, many returns of the Season, as pleasent, as delightfull as the present for the winter hitherto has been as mild, as the Summer was cold. “Sterne Says, God tempers the wind to the Shorn Lamb” and the winter as yet; has been temperd to the wants, and necessities of the people: altho their Herbage was cut off, and the Herds in their stalls will be...
“Oh that I too, could make a visit to my Father,” was your exclamation in your last Letter. more than a visit You may make, my dear Son, If the Newspapers may be credited, for they announce from South to North, that you are to be recall’d and to fill the department of State. this is repeated over and again, & appears to give universal satisfaction. this I learn from all quarters—I rejoice in...
I think I will not give to any passenger any Letters, unless a Letter of introduction, for however urgent they are to be charged with them, I find frequently that they lay months before they are deliverd. If my Letters cannot have the Novelty of youth to recommend them, They will lose their most valuable quality, and be very dull in their old Age—like a twice told tale, and very like, better...
while your Father is deeply engaged, in reading, Dupuis “orgine de Tous Les Cultes ou Religion universelle” which he Says is the most Learned work he ever read. all is Silent around me, and I embrace this Season of quiet and tranquility to write to you, and to acknowledge your Letter of August 12th No 92.—your hand writing, always gives me a Spring to my Spirits, and is like a cordial, altho...
Since my Letter to you of the 23 of August I have only written one Letter! it was to Abbe Shaw congratulating her upon her marriage, which took place upon the 18th of this month, to which I was invited, but many Circumstances prevented my attendance. She is gone with her Husband to reside in Salem. She has the prospect of being happily married. She is a good and amiable girl, possessing many...
I yesterday received some Letters from the Children dated 26 June. as I had some weeks before received my June Letter from you, I had not any right to expect an other of the Same Month, and altho’ as Shakespeare says, “my appetite grows on what it feeds on” I must own I am avaricious in this respect. In this still calm, and political pause I must entertain you with domestic occurrences, one of...
I make it a rule to begin my Letters by an acknowledgment of those which I have received from you, when any such there are. I have now the pleasure to notice yours of june the 6th No 89—I do this for two reasons—1st because every correspondent likes to know, that their Letters, are received, and 2ly that they are worthy notice, and there is not any Subject, apparently trivial in itself, but...
I have to acknowledge your favours of 23 April No. 86 of the 15 May No 87, and yesterday by mr Bond your Letter of May 20th No 88, and the Review and news paper The Reviews you will charge, as your Father requests, with the other Books which you Send him I inclose to you a Strip of a newspaper which contains some account of our National Jubilee, an event of more consequence to America, than...
The east wind of this day, will prevent the Sailing of the Galen, and it gives me the opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of May 13th No 87; and the papers containing the Royal Marriage which came to hand last Evening: by the arrival of a vessel at N york; this interesting , and important intelligence, had been partially communicated to the publick a week before—Some...
If I write you ten Letters, to one from you, Still I Should be your debtor, for one of yours is worth ten of mine, and one over— yet in Love, and affection, the account Shall be balanced—I Shall always recollect with a pleasure, which I cannot describe, the Sensation I felt, when mr Woodard returnd from Russia and came to see me. I know well his Father, and Family, but him I had never Seen...