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    • Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA …
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)" AND Author="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)"
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I take my pen to perform my promice of writing to you and to wish you a happy new year may heaven pour down those blessings upon you that will make this life agreable this is an unsertain World we know not what a day may bringh forth & when we think we are in the utmost dainger we may be in the least Mrs. Waren has lately had a severe trial of her fortitude A Son as it ware raisd from the arms...
Last weak I had the pleasure to receive too letters from my friend Myrtilla, aney time when you have letters if you send them to Brackets and dirrect them to General Waren or his Laidie, they will come safe to hand; you must cover them if you intend I shall read them first: I should have wrote you a longer letter by this opportunity but am prevented by an accident, which has taken up my...
If aney person had told me the night I left Braintree that I should have ben at Plymouth almost seven weaks and have received only one letter from my Mamma and too from my Myrtilla I should have thought they ware capable of telling a falshood but I find it too true. I had almost taken up a resollution not to have wrote to aney of my Braintree friends untill I had received letters from them,...
It is now past ten however I will write you a few lines as I flatter myself they will be axcepttable, for you know we ar too apt to judge others by our own feelings. I will ask you one question whetheir if you have an opportunity to write me you dont imbrace it if you dont happen to be in dept debt ? If we ware too or three hundred miles distant I could expect to hear as often from you as I do...
As a convenient opportunity offoring by General Warren I cannot let it excape without a line for my Myrtilla. I now take up my pen to inform you that I do not feel in the writing humour and am determind to indulge myself and give way to thease Lazy freeks. I shall take my pen in the eve again and will give you an account how I shall have spent the afternoon for I am now already trigd to...
I have began too or three letters to you but have burnt them, all for reasons that you need not be inquisitive to know. If they had been fit for your perusal you should have seen them: I have just returned from Germantown, my favourite Miss Mayhew is there, in as good spirits as usual. Our friend Amanda talks of leaveing Ger manto wn her mamma has sent for her, I had not time to ask her why....
And are you really determined my Dear Brother not to condescend to write to your Sister again till She has answered some of your letters. I must acknowledge myself rather in arrears, but you must consider that you are daily removing from one scene to another, new and pleasing objects continually engage your attention, and furnish you with new subjects and pleasing ideas which if related by you...
My mamma has so often reminded me of a deficiency in politeness in not replying to your letter which is now too long out of date to answer, that I can no longer withstand her frequent solicit at ions, and an opportunity offering by Mr. Charles Storer I am prevailed upon to take your attention from more important subjects to the perusal of a letter which will afford no pleasure but as it will...
Knowing your benevolent heart is ever gratified by hearing of the wellfare of your friends, and feeling a disposition to scrible, you Eliza first claim my attention. I hope ere this your health and spirits are perfectly restored and every one of the family to their usual chearfulness. Do not my Dear Girl dwell too long on the dark side of affairs, it impairs your health and sinks your spirits....
I am conscious my dear Brother that I have appeared deficient in my duty and affection by neglecting to write you often. I have very little encouragement to continue a correspondance without any return from you. I do not believe you deficient in writing; it is a disagreable circumstance that we receive so small a part of the letters that are written. Mamma has receiv’d letters from Pappa and...