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    [1786]

    From: Adams Papers | Diary of John Quincy Adams | Volume 2 | [1786]

    1[March 1786] (Adams Papers)
    Between 9 and 10 in the morning, I went to the President’s, and was there admitted examined, before, the President, the four Tutors three Professors, and Librarian. The first book was Horace, where Mr. James the Latin Tutor told me to turn to the Carmen saeculare where I construed 3 stanza’s, and parsed the word sylvarum , but called potens a substantive. Mr. Jennison, the greek Tutor then put...
    2[April 1786] (Adams Papers)
    After having had a month of March uncommonly pleasant, and warm, the Present one begins with a Snow Storm. From about 2 o’clock afternoon it has snow’d, steadily till late in the Evening. Our Class recited this morning in Doddridge, but I was not in. My Chamber is so situated that the College bell, does, not sound with sufficient force to wake me, in the morning, and I have not of late been...
    3[May 1786] (Adams Papers)
    We recite this Week again to Mr. Jennison. This is a young man: indeed much too young, (as are all the Tutors,) for the Place he occupies. Before he took his second degree, which was last Commencement, he was chosen a Tutor, of mathematics, in which he betray’d his Ignorance often. In hearing the Sophimores recite in Geography, he had occasion to speak, of the alteration of the Style by Pope...
    4[June 1786] (Adams Papers)
    We had this forenoon a Lecture from Mr. Williams. Upon the reflection and the refraction of light. It is not usual for him to give Lectures on Thursdays, as many of both the Classes, are always absent on that day; as was the Case to day, not above half being present. But he has been so long prevented, by the weather, from giving any, that he is obliged to take the first fair day that happened:...
    5Finis. (Adams Papers)
    This Latin proverb originally appeared at the beginning of JQA ’s first discourse before the A.B. Club (entry for 12 June , above).
    6[Titlepage] (Adams Papers)
    Ephemeris. Titlepage for D/JQA/11, covering the inclusive dates inscribed. The top line on this page is written in an earlier hand, presumably the date on which he purchased the blank Diary book. This same inscription appears on the top of titlepages of D/JQA/10 and 12, which are identical 380-page leather-bound books, all measuring 4¼″ × 6¾″. “Time slips away, and we grow old with silent...
    7[July 1786] (Adams Papers)
    The military company, having obtained a promise of 60 stand of arms, met immediately after Dinner, and chose their officers, and agreed to a Code of Laws. They were upon the business more than two hours. Vose, was chosen Captain, Fiske, and Packard lieutenants, and Chandler 1st. Ensign. This was the college military company, founded in 1770, and named the Marti-Mercurian Band because of its...
    8[August 1786] (Adams Papers)
    There was a meeting of an association of ministers here this day; but there were only three present. Mr. Adams preach’d the Lecture, and was a whole hour in Sermon, endeavouring to prove, the Trinity, and the existence of hell. After all I believe he left all his hearers where he found them, and he was certainly much too long. After dinner I went with Mrs. White, Miss P. M’Kinstry, and Leonard...
    9[September 1786] (Adams Papers)
    Studied Algebra all the forenoon. Took books from the Library, Brydone’s Tour vol: 2d. Ossian’s Poems, and Boswell’s Corsica. The weather begins to grow quite cold. This morning I shivered, almost all prayer Time. It is however to be hoped it will not set in, so soon. Patrick Brydone, A Tour Through Sicily and Malta..., 2 vols., London, 1774; The Works of Ossian, The Son of Fingal, Transl....
    10[October 1786] (Adams Papers)
    Mr. Paine, preached here, in the forenoon from Acts IV. 12. Neither is there salvation in any other, and in the afternoon from I of Corinthians XVI. 14. Let all your things be done with Charity. The morning discourse was doctrinal, and therefore not so pleasing a Subject as the other; which was excellent. His arguments in favour of Charity, were such as naturally arise from the Subject, but...