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Results 1101-1150 of 183,496 sorted by editorial placement
110119. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
The two Privateers, which were in Sight Yesterday, are so still with two others. Our Captain at length laid too, hoisted his Colours and fired a Gun as a Challenge. One of them hoisted English Colours and fired a Gun, which I suppose was accepting the Challenge. Our Captain gave her two Broad Sides, for the Sake of exercising his Men, and some of his Balls went beyond her, some before and some...
110220. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
Two Privateers have been in sight all this day. One advanced, and fired several Guns in order to make Us hoist our Colours. But Captain Chavan would not do them that Honour. They are afraid to come near. But this it is. Every day We have a No. in Sight, so that there is no Chance for a Vessell to pass without Convoy. Our Captain Mr. Chavan has a Cross of St. Louis, and one of his Midshipmen...
1103Monday June 21. (Adams Papers)
This Morning I found Mr. Marbois recovered of his Sea Sickness. I fell into Conversation with him, about his illness, advised a Dish of Tea, which he readily accepted, told him he must learn to drink Tea in America in order to please the Ladies, who all drank Tea. That the american Ladies shone at the Tea Table. He said, he had heard they were very amiable and of agreable Conversation. I said...
1104June 22. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
We have had a fine Wind ever since We came out of L’orient, but it blows fresher today than ever. Yet We go but about 5 Knots, because being obliged to wait for the Three Friends, and the Foudroyant, which sail slow, We cannot carry Sail. With all our Sails We might now go eleven Knots. This is Mercantile Politicks of C haumont and W illiams in getting the Chevaliers Baggage on Board those...
1105June 23. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
This Forenoon, fell strangely, yet very easily into Conversation with M.M. I went up to him—M.M. said I, how many Persons have you in your Train and that of the Chevalier who speak the German Language?— Only my Servant, said he, besides myself and the Chev alier .—It will be a great Advantage to you said I in America, especially in Pensilvania, to be able to speak German. There is a great Body...
1106June 24. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
Mr. Marbois told a Story of an Ecclesiastic, who pronounced a funeral oration on Marshall Saxe.—He compared him to Alcides, who ballanced long whether he should follow the Path of Virtue or of Sloth, and at last chose the former. But Saxe, after ballancing long, did better by determining to follow both, i.e. Pleasure and Virtue. This Evening I went into our State Room, where I found Mr....
1107June 25. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
June 25. Fryday.
1108June 26 Saturday. (Adams Papers)
June 26 Saturday.
110927 Sunday. (Adams Papers)
27 Sunday.
1110June 28 Monday. (Adams Papers)
We have been favoured, in our Voyage hitherto, beyond my utmost Expectations. We have enjoyed a Succession of favourable Winds and Weather, from the Time of our leaving L’orient to this Moment. The Discipline, on Board this Ship, is a constant Subject of Speculation to me. I have seen no Punishments inflicted, no Blows struck, nor heard scarcely an Angry Word spoken, from the Captain to any of...
11111779. June 30. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
Mr. Marbois, this Morning, upon my Enquiry, told me, that the Chevalier de la Luzerne is the Grandson of the famous Chancelier de la Moignon by his Mothers Side. That the Marchall Broglie is a Cousin to the Chevalier. He also told me, that he himself, Mr. Marbois, was born in Metz, where the Comte de Broglie is Commandant. That going lately to Metz to be admitted a Counsellor in Parliament, he...
1112[July 1779] (Adams Papers)
Walking this afternoon, with Mr. Marbois, upon the Quarter Deck, I said frankly to him, that I had expected that Mr. Garnier would have been sent to America. That I had observed some things in the Conduct of B. and C. which made me conjecture and believe that they were planning to have Mr. G arnier succeed Mr. G érard . That there was a great Intimacy between B. and Mr. G arnier . Between our...
1113July 2d. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Walking this afternoon, with Mr. Marbois, upon the Quarter Deck, I said frankly to him, that I had expected that Mr. Garnier would have been sent to America. That I had observed some things in the Conduct of B. and C. which made me conjecture and believe that they were planning to have Mr. G arnier succeed Mr. G érard . That there was a great Intimacy between B. and Mr. G arnier . Between our...
11141779 July 4th. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
This Morning, having stepped out of my Cabbin, for a few Minutes, I found upon my Return, that the Compliments of the following Gentlemen, were left chez Moy, on the Anniversary of American Independence, Le Chevalier de La Luzerne. Mr. De Marbois. Mr. Bide de Chavagnes, Capne. des Vaux. du Roy de France, commdnt. la Sensible Le Chev. de Goisbriand, the Second in Command Mr. De la Forest. Mr....
11151779. July 16. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Since I have been in this Ship I have read Robertsons History of America in 4 Volumes, in French, and four Volumes of the Observateur Anglois, in a series of Letters from my Lord All Eye to my Lord All Ear. I am now reading Les Negotiations De Monsieur Le President Jeannin. He was Ambassador from Henry the fourth, at the Hague, at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century, and is reputed one of...
11161779 July 17th. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Three Days past We have sounded for the Grand bane but have not found it. By the Reckonings of all the officers, We ought to be now Ten Leagues upon the Banch. It is surprizing to me, that We have not seen more Fish. A few Whales, a few Porpoises and two Sharks are all We have seen. The two Sharks, We caught, with a Shark Hook and a Bit of Pork for a Bait. We cutt up the first, and threw over...
11171779. July 20. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
I was struck with these Words in a Letter from the President Jeannin to M. Bellegarde of 28 Jany. 1609 Si le Roy “est content de ma Conduite, et de la Diligence et Fidelitè, dont j’use pour executer ponctuellement ce qu’il m’a commandé c’est deja une Espece de recompense qui donne grande Satisfaction à un homme de bien; et quand il ne m’en aviendra rien de mieux, j’en accuserai plutot mon...
11181779, Fryday July 30. (Adams Papers)
We are not yet arrived to the Bane of St. George. Calms, contrary Winds &c. detain Us. Saw a Whale spouting and blowing and leaping to day in our Wake—a Grampus they say.
11191779 July 31 Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Found Bottom this Morning on St. Georges Bane. The Weather, the Wind, the Discovery of our Longitude, give Us all, fine Spirits this Morning. The Wind is as good as We could wish it. We are now about to pass the Day and Night of greatest Danger. By the present Appearances, We are highly favoured. But Appearances are often deceitful. At the Moment I am writing a thick fog comes up, on all...
1120[November 1779] (Adams Papers)
Took Leave of my Family, and rode to Boston with my Son Charles, nine years of Age last May. At four O Clock went on board the french Frigate the Sensible, Mr. Thaxter, my Son John, twelve Years old last July, and my Servant Joseph Stevens having come on Board in the Morning.—I find the Frigate crouded with Passengers, and Sailors, full 350 Men. They have recruited a great Number here. First...
Took Leave of my Family, and rode to Boston with my Son Charles, nine years of Age last May. At four O Clock went on board the french Frigate the Sensible, Mr. Thaxter, my Son John, twelve Years old last July, and my Servant Joseph Stevens having come on Board in the Morning.—I find the Frigate crouded with Passengers, and Sailors, full 350 Men. They have recruited a great Number here. First...
112216. (Adams Papers)
Found a Grammar, entitled, Élémens de la Langue Angloise, ou Méthode pratique, pour apprendre facilement cette Langue. Par M. Siret, A Paris, chez Ruault, Libraire, rue de la Harpe, près de la rue Serpente. 1773. Avec Approbation, et Permission.
112324. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
On the grand Bank of N ew F ound L and .—A few days ago, We spoke an American Privateer, the General Lincoln; Captain Barnes. Wrote Letters by him to my family. Mr. Dana wrote. Mr. Thaxter, Mr. John, and several others. Heard, since I came on board, several Hints concerning W.; Son of ——. That he has made a great Fortune—by Privateering, by Trade, by buying Sailors Shares, and by gambling....
112425. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
Arose at 4. A fair Wind and good Weather. We have passed the Grand Bank, sounded Yesterday afternoon and found bottom in 30 fathom of Water, on the Eastermost Edge of the Bank.
112526. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Leur Gouvernement, (des Bataviennes) fut un Malange de Monarchie, d’aristocratie, et democratic On y voioit un chef, qui n’etoit proprement, que le premier des Citoiens, et qui donnoit, moins des ordres, que des Conseils. Les Grands, qui jugeoient les Procés de leur district, et commandoient les Troupes, etoient choisis, comme les rois dans les assemblees generales. Cent Personnes, prises dans...
1126[December 1779] (Adams Papers)
We are now supposed to be within 100 Leagues of Ferrol or Corunna, to one of which Places We are bound. The Leak in the Frigate, which keeps two Pomps constantly going, has determined the Captn. to put into Spain. This Resolution is an Embarrassment to me. Whether to travail by Land to Paris, or wait for the Frigate. Whether I can get Carriages, Horses, Mules &c. What Accommodations I can get...
11271779 December [5]. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
We are now supposed to be within 100 Leagues of Ferrol or Corunna, to one of which Places We are bound. The Leak in the Frigate, which keeps two Pomps constantly going, has determined the Captn. to put into Spain. This Resolution is an Embarrassment to me. Whether to travail by Land to Paris, or wait for the Frigate. Whether I can get Carriages, Horses, Mules &c. What Accommodations I can get...
11281779 December 7. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
About 11. O Clock discovered Land—two large Mountains, one sharp and steep, another large and broad.—We passed 3 Capes, Finisterre, Tortanes Torinaña and Veillane Villano . Yesterday the Chevr. de la Molion gave me some Nuts which he call’d Noix d’Acajou. They are the same which I have often seen, and which were called Cooshoo Nuts. The true name is Acajou Nuts. They are shaped like our large...
11298 Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
Got into Ferrol, where We found the french Ships of the Line, went on Board the General Sade, went ashore, visited the Spanish General Don Joseph St. Vincent, took a Walk about Town, saw a great No. of Spanish and french Officers. Returned on Board the Frigate. See entry of 13 Dec. , below. JQA ’s Diary provides a great deal more detail on the entrance to the harbor and the events of this day...
11309. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
Came on Shore with all my family. Took Lodgings. Dined with the Spanish Lieutenant General of the Marine with 24 french and Spanish officers. Don Joseph is an old Officer, but has a great deal of Vivacity and Bonhommie. The Difference between the Faces and Airs of the French and Spanish Officers, is more obvious and striking than that of their Uniforms. Gravity and Silence distinguish the...
11311779 December 10. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Supped and slept at my Lodgings. Breakfasted on Spanish Chocolate which answers the Fame it has acquired in the World. Every Body congratulates Us, on our Safe Arrival at this Place. The Leak in the Sensible, increases since she has been at Anchor, and every Body thinks We have been in great danger.
113213 Monday. (Adams Papers)
Yesterday, I walked about the Town but there is nothing to be seen, excepting two Churches and the Arsenals, dry docks, Fortifications and Ships of War. The Inconvenience of this Harbour is, the Entrance is so narrow, that there is no Possibility of going out but when the Wind is one Way, i.e. South East, or thereabouts. The Three french Ships of the Line here are the Triomphant, the Souverain...
11331779 Decr. 14. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Walked to the Barracks and dry docks, to shew them to Cha rles . The Stone of which these Works are made is about as good as Braintree Southcommon Stone. Went into the Church of St. Julien, which is magnificent—Numbers of Devots upon their Knees. This afternoon We cross the Water to go to Corunna. Street near the Head the House We have lodged en la Calle de la Madalena, junto coca, en casa of...
11341779 December 15. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
This Morning We arose at 5 or 6 O Clock, went over in a Boat, and mounted our Mules. Thirteen of them in Number and two Mulateers —one of whom went before for a Guide and the other followed after, to pick up Stragglers. We rode over very bad roads, and very high Mountains, where We had a very extensive Country, appearing to be a rich Soil and well cultivated but very few Plantations of Trees.—...
113516. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
This Morning the Governor of the Province of Gallice, and the Governor of the Town of Corunna came to my Lodgings at the Hotel du grand Amiral, to return the Visit I made them last Evening. His Excellency invited me to dine with him tomorrow with all my family. He insisted upon seeing my Sons. Said I run a great Risque in taking with me, my Children. Said he had passed not far from my Country,...
11361779 December 17. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
The Consul conducted me to the Souvereign Court of Justice. There are three Halls—one of civil Jurisdiction, another of Criminal, and a third of both. The three youngest Judges are the criminal Judges. The Consul introduced me to the President, and the other Judges and to the Attorney General in their Robes. The Robes, Wigs and bands both of the Judges and Lawyers are nearly like ours at...
11371779 Decr. 18 Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Walked all round the Town, round the Wharves, Slips &c. on the Water and round the Walls vs. the Country. Afternoon walked, to see the Artillery. 12 Stands of Arms, Cannon, Bombs, Balls, Mortars &c. have been all packed up for Sometime. By the last Post Orders arrived to put up 5000 more in the same Manner, ready to embark, nobody knows where. Saw the Magazines, Arsenals, Shops &c.,...
11381779 December 19. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
Dined, with Monsieur De Tournelle the French Consul, in Company, with all my Family, the Regent, or President of the Sovereign Court of the Province of Galicia, the Attorney General, the Administrator of the Kings Revenue of Tobacco, and the Commandant of Artillery, Mr. Lagonaore, &c. We had every Luxury, but the Wines were Bourdeaux, Champagne, Burgundy, Sherry, Alicante, Navarre, and Vin de...
11391779 Decr. 20. Monday. (Adams Papers)
Went to the Audiencia, where We saw the four Judges setting in their Robes, the Advocates in theirs a little below and the Attorneys lower down still. We heard a Cause argued. The Advocates argued sitting, used a great deal of Action with their Hands and Arms, and spoke with Eagerness. But the Tone of oratory seemed to be wanting.
Drank Tea, at Senior Lagoaneres. Saw the Ladies drink Chocolat in the Spanish Fashion. A Servant brought in a Salver, with a Number of Tumblers, of clean, clear Glass, full of cold Water, and a Plate of Cakes, which were light Pieces of Sugar. Each Lady took a Tumbler of Water and a Piece of Sugar, dipped her Sugar in her Tumbler of Water, eat the one and drank the other. The Servant then...
11411779 December 24. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Dined on Board the Bellepoule, with the Officers of the Galatea and the Bellepoule.
Went to the Palace, at 11. o Clock, to take my Leave of his Excellency. Mr. O Heir the Governor of the Town went with me. The general repeated a Thousand obliging Things, which he had said to me, when I first saw him and dined with him.
114326. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
At half after two, We mounted our Carriages and Mules, and rode four Leagues to Betanzos, the ancient Capital of the Kingdom of Gallicia, and the Place where the Archives are still kept. We saw the Building, a long Square stone Building without any Roof, opposite the Church. There are in this Place two Churches and two Convents. The last League of the Road was very bad, mountainous and rocky...
114427. (Adams Papers)
Travelled from Betanzos to Castillano. The Roads still mountainous and rocky. We broke one of our Axletrees, early in the day, which prevented Us from going more than 4 Leagues in the whole. The House where We lodge is of Stone, two Stories high. We entered into the Kitchen. No floor but the ground, and no Carpet but Straw, trodden into mire, by Men, Hogs, Horses, Mules, &c. In the Middle of...
11451779. Decr. 28. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Went from Castillan to Baamonde. The first Part of the Road, very bad, the latter Part tolerable. The whole Country We have passed, is very mountainous and rocky. There is here and there a Vally, and here and there a Farm that looks beautifully cultivated. But in general the Mountains are covered with Furze, and are not well cultivated. I am astonished to see so few Trees. Scarce an Elm, Oak,...
11461779. Decr. 30. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
At Lugo, where We arrived Yesterday. We passed Yesterday the River Minho which originates in the Mountains of Asturies, and flows thro Portugal. We went to see the Cathedral Church at Lugo, which is very rich. A Youth came to me in the street and said he was a Bostonian, a Son of Mr. Thomas Hickling. Went a Privateering in an English Vessell and was taken by the Spaniards.—Unfortunately taken...
1147Decr. 31. Fryday. (Adams Papers)
Rode from Galliego to Sebrero, Seven Leagues. The Journey Yesterday and to day has been very agreable. The Weather, remarkably fair, and dry, and the Roads not so bad as We expected. There is the grandest Profusion of wild irregular Mountains, that I ever saw—Yet laboured and cultivated every one, to its Summit. The Fields of Grain, are all green. We passed a Rang of Mountains that were white...
1148[January 1780] (Adams Papers)
Arrived at Villa Franca, Seven Leagues. The Road at first was very bad. Steep, sharp Pitches, ragged Rocks, &c. We then came into the Road of Leon, which is made seemingly out of a Rock. It was an excellent Road for a League and an half. We then came to a River, and travelled along the Banks of it for some Leagues. This Way was as bad as the other was good. Miry, rocky, up and down untill We...
11491780. January 1st. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Arrived at Villa Franca, Seven Leagues. The Road at first was very bad. Steep, sharp Pitches, ragged Rocks, &c. We then came into the Road of Leon, which is made seemingly out of a Rock. It was an excellent Road for a League and an half. We then came to a River, and travelled along the Banks of it for some Leagues. This Way was as bad as the other was good. Miry, rocky, up and down untill We...
11501780. January 2. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
Rode from Villa franca de el Bierzo Rio P uen te. We dined at Ponferrada. We passed through several Villages and over Bridges and Rivers. We passed Campo de Narraya, Cacabelos Rio P uente and Ponferrada where We dined. The Country grows smoother. The cavalcade stopped this night at Bembibre, a village seven leagues beyond Villafranca del Bierzo; both JQA and Dana had difficulty spelling its...